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Latest Planetary engineering Stories

aerosols climate
2014-08-07 03:00:05

Alan Buis, Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Kimm Fesenmaier, Caltech Of all the factors that influence Earth's changing climate, the effect that tiny particles in Earth's atmosphere called aerosols have on clouds is the least well understood. Aerosols scatter and absorb incoming sunlight and affect the formation and properties of clouds. Among all cloud types, low-level clouds over the ocean, which cover about one-third of the ocean's surface, have the biggest impact on the albedo, or...

2014-06-04 15:34:13

Simon Fraser University Tinkering with climate change through climate engineering isn't going to help us get around what we have to do says a new report authored by researchers at six universities, including Simon Fraser University. After evaluating a range of possible climate-altering approaches to dissipating greenhouse gases and reducing warming, the interdisciplinary team concluded there's no way around it. We have to reduce the amount of carbon being released into the atmosphere....

emission and transport of dust and other important aerosols to the Southern Ocean on Dec. 30, 2006
2014-03-22 06:56:44

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In a region of the Southern Ocean, iron fertilization caused plankton to thrive during the last ice age, according to a new study from Princeton University and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich. The findings, published in Science, confirm a longstanding theory that wind-borne dust carried iron to this region of the Antarctic. This iron dust drove plankton growth and eventually led to the removal of carbon dioxide...

Global Warming Cooled Down By Volcanic Eruptions
2014-02-25 04:32:25

[ Watch the Video: Global Warming Cooled By Volcanoes ] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report they have found that volcanic eruptions in the early part of the 21st century have cooled the planet. The total heat content of the ocean, along with global-mean temperatures at the surface of the planet and in the troposphere have shown relatively little warming since 1998. This “slow-down” has been the topic of...

Ending Geoengineering Prematurely May Worsen Global Warming
2014-02-19 11:37:28

Ranjini Raghunath for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Starting and then stopping geoengineering techniques could aggravate global warming, scientists warn. A proposed mitigation technique which involves spewing sulfur particles into the atmosphere could help combat climate change – but if stopped after being implemented, it could worsen the problem, according to a new study from University of Washington researchers. Spewing sulfur particles into the air could cool the planet by...

2014-02-18 14:04:47

As a range of climate change mitigation scenarios are discussed, University of Washington researchers have found that the injection of sulfate particles into the atmosphere to reflect sunlight and curb the effects of global warming could pose a severe threat if not maintained indefinitely and supported by strict reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The new study, published today, 18 February, in IOP Publishing's journal Environmental Research Letters, has highlighted the risks of...

Geoengineering Earth's Climate
2013-12-18 10:37:49

Ranjini Raghunath for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Artificial clouds that reflect sunlight back into space. A StratoShield that spews sulfur dioxide particles into space like a volcano, cooling the planet’s surface. Microbial blooms that grow on iron injected into the ocean and trap carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. These are some of the latest ideas being tested to combat climate change in an emerging and hotly-debated field called geoengineering. Geoengineering involves use...

Reversing Climate Change Cannot Be Accomplished Via Geoengineering
2013-12-05 13:59:47

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Geoengineering the climate has been suggested as a way  to help lessen the impact of climate change, but new research published in Earth System Dynamics says this approach would not likely succeed. German researchers say that reducing the amount of sunlight reaching the planet’s surface by geoengineering may not undo climate change. The team used a simple energy balance analysis to explain how the Earth’s water cycle responds...

Vital Precipitation Could Be Lost Through Climate Geoengineering
2013-11-01 07:38:38

[ Watch the Video: Monsoonal Rains Could Shrink Due To Geoengineering ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study, led by scientists from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), shows that although a significant build-up in greenhouse gases in the atmosphere would alter worldwide precipitation patterns, a widely discussed technological approach to reduce future global warming would also interfere with rainfall and snowfall. The findings, published...

2013-10-31 23:21:07

Although a significant build-up in greenhouse gases in the atmosphere would alter worldwide precipitation patterns, geoengineering would also interfere with rainfall and snowfall. An international study, led by NCAR scientists, finds that “geoengineering” could result in monsoonal rains in North America, East Asia, and other regions dropping by 5-7 percent compared to preindustrial conditions because of less evaporation and reduced plant emissions of water. Boulder, CO (PRWEB) October...


Latest Planetary engineering Reference Libraries

8_0a0df4f1bee06ec8e535aec78634f0a12
2004-10-19 04:45:44

Terraforming -- Terraforming (literally, "Earth-shaping") is the process of modifying a planet, moon or other body to a more habitable atmosphere, temperature or ecology. The term was first used in a science fiction novel, 'Seetee Shock' (1940?) by Jack Williamson, but the actual concept is older than that. An example in fiction is 'First and Last Men' by Olaf Stapledon in which Venus is modified, after a long and destructive war with the original inhabitants, who naturally object to the...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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