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Latest Planetary engineering Stories

3886b1739122b522f56ee1746d696984
2011-04-06 12:17:04

According to new research, whitening clouds by spraying them with seawater could do more harm than good for climate change. Whiter clouds reflect more solar energy back into space, which inevitably cools the Earth. However a study presented at the European Geosciences Union meeting found that using water droplets of the wrong size would lead to warming, not cooling. One scientist said it should be possible to make sure droplets were the correct size. John Latham of the University...

2011-01-31 14:13:47

Geoengineering schemes involving ocean fertilization to affect climate have a low chance of success, according to the first summary for policymakers on the issue. Failure to tackle rising greenhouse gas emissions effectively has led to intensifying debate on geoengineering - deliberate large-scale schemes to slow the rate at which Earth is heating up. The public debate often mixes opinion with fact so scientists have now released the first summary for policymakers on ocean fertilization, one...

5c48d8d88f71baa9c888c7755ceb94381
2011-01-24 10:15:00

Could Dimming the Sun Change Teleconnections in Weather Patterns as we Know Them? Solar radiation management projects, also known as sun dimming, seek to reduce the amount of sunlight hitting the Earth to counteract the effects of climate change. Global dimming can occur as a side-effect of fossil fuels or as a result of volcanic eruptions, but the consequences of deliberate sun dimming as a geoengineering tool are unknown. A new study by Dr Peter Braesicke, from the Centre for Atmospheric...

2010-10-07 13:40:48

Advocates for seeding regions of the ocean with iron to combat global warming should be interested in a new study published today in Geophysical Research Letters. A Canada-US team led by University of Victoria oceanographer Dr. Roberta Hamme describes how the 2008 eruption of the Kasatochi volcano in the Aleutian Islands spewed iron-laden ash over a large swath of the North Pacific. The result, says Hamme, was an "ocean productivity event of unprecedented magnitude""”the largest...

2010-10-04 14:21:00

DALLAS, Oct. 4 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Like it or not, a climate change emergency is possible, and various approaches collectively called geoengineering could be the only affordable and fast-acting ways to avoid a catastrophe, according to an article in the fall Issues in Science and Technology. According to authors Ken Caldeira of the Carnegie Institution and David Keith of the University of Calgary, world leaders may at some point be compelled to act to prevent further global...

2010-09-20 22:27:03

Reflecting sunlight from the Earth by geoengineering would undoubtedly cool the climate, but would different countries agree on how much to reflect? Research by climate scientists at the University of Bristol shows that the impact of geoengineering would be felt in very different ways across the world. Previous studies of geoengineering approaches, aimed at averting dangerous climate change, have shown that although the average global temperature could be restored to 'normal' levels, some...

2010-09-16 17:45:22

Scientists at the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology have taken a new approach on examining a proposal to fix the warming planet. So-called geoengineering ideas"”large-scale projects to change the Earth's climate"”have included erecting giant mirrors in space to reflect solar radiation, injecting aerosols of sulfate into the stratosphere making a global sunshade, and much more. Past modeling of the sulfate idea looked at how the stratospheric aerosols might affect...

2010-06-29 10:47:00

DALLAS, June 29 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Alarming media reports have raised concern about U.S. dependence on foreign sources of rare minerals that are critically important in military applications and emerging industries. But there is no need to panic, according to an article in the Summer 2010 Issues in Science and Technology. Although there is cause for concern about the supply of critical minerals, there are a number of steps that policymakers and industrial consumers can take to head...

694492edea989e6de4df9dfe06fc8f8d1
2010-06-28 14:10:20

One proposed emergency fix to halt global warming is to seed clouds over the ocean to make them more reflective, reducing the solar radiation absorbed by the Earth. But the scheme could also change global rainfall patterns, raising concerns of water shortages on land. A new study by the Carnegie Institution, in collaboration with the Indian Institute of Science, suggests that altered atmospheric circulation under the scheme in fact could increase monsoonal rains and cause the continents to...

2010-06-02 20:39:26

Airplanes, ground instruments, and weather balloons to study effect of airborne particles on climate More than 60 scientists from a dozen institutions have converged on this urban area to study how tiny particles called aerosols affect the climate. Sending airplanes and weather balloons outfitted with instruments up in the air, the team will be sampling aerosols in the Sacramento Valley from June 2-28. Researchers from the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in...


Latest Planetary engineering Reference Libraries

8_0a0df4f1bee06ec8e535aec78634f0a12
2004-10-19 04:45:44

Terraforming -- Terraforming (literally, "Earth-shaping") is the process of modifying a planet, moon or other body to a more habitable atmosphere, temperature or ecology. The term was first used in a science fiction novel, 'Seetee Shock' (1940?) by Jack Williamson, but the actual concept is older than that. An example in fiction is 'First and Last Men' by Olaf Stapledon in which Venus is modified, after a long and destructive war with the original inhabitants, who naturally object to the...

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Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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