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Latest Planetary geology Stories

Small Asteroid Regolith Formed By Thermal Fatigue
2014-04-04 06:21:44

John P. Millis, Ph.D. for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Small asteroids contain a layer of loose, unconsolidated rock and dust known as a regolith composed of centimeter-sized fragments and smaller particles. New research from researchers at the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute at Johns Hopkins University, Institut Supérieur de l'Aéronautique et de l'Espace and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), have now determined that this layer is formed by...

John Lennon Shines On: IAU Names Mercury Crater After Rock Legend
2013-12-20 13:34:02

Gerard LeBlond for redorbit.com - Your Universe Online John Lennon was born on October 9, 1940 in Liverpool, England. He started his first band, The Quarrymen, while still in high school. After Paul McCartney and George Harrison joined the band the name was changed to The Beatles. He and his band mates became rock legends, but John met a tragic end on December 8, 1980. Now Lennon, along with nine other notable celebrities of the past, have been honored by having impact craters on...

New Evidence Gives New Life To ‘Percolation’ Theory For Earth’s Core
2013-10-08 17:23:32

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online Scientists writing in the journal Nature Geoscience say that a similar process to that which allows water to yank oils from ground coffee  in order to make a cup of joe in the morning, could be how the Earth's core formed. Stanford University scientists recreated the intense pressures and temperatures inside Earth and found that an iron melt network may have helped grow the Earth's core. The finding revisits a theory first proposed...

Aram Chaos
2013-09-14 03:59:57

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The catastrophic melting and outflow of a buried ice lake formed the lumpy, bumpy floor of an ancient impact crater on Mars known as Aram Chaos. Satellite observations of the 173 mile wide and 2.5 mile deep crater were combined with models of the ice melting process and resulting catastrophic outflow for a new study presented at the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) at UCL in London by Michael Roda of the Utrecht University....

Images Beneath Mars Surface
2013-08-12 12:09:33

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A newly released image from the European Space Agency (ESA) offered a groundbreaking peek under the surface of Mars courtesy of the international agency’s Mars Express orbiter. Using ground penetrating radar, the spacecraft was able to image the composition of Mars several miles below the surface, revealing various layers of ice, dust and rock. The image essentially revealed a 3,500-mile slice through the planet’s southern...

Mars Double Layered Craters Are The Result Of Impactors And Ice
2013-08-06 04:16:26

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The over 600 double-layer ejecta (DLE) craters on Mars resulted because the planet's surface was covered by a thick sheet of ice during the time of impact, geologists from Brown University have discovered. According to David Kutai Weiss, a graduate student at the Providence, Rhode Island school, and geological science professor James W. Head, DLEs - like most craters - are surrounded by debris that is excavated when an asteroid or...

New Mars Express Images Show Craters Once Filled With Water
2013-08-01 17:46:25

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online Newly released images from the European Space Agency (ESA) show how water and other natural forces shaped craters and other surface features on Mars. According to a statement from the space agency, the craters shown were once filled with sediments and water. Only traces of their history can now be found in the Martian desert. The images, snapped on January 15 by ESA’s Mars Express orbiter, show a swath of the red planet just a...

2013-07-29 16:20:26

WASHINGTON, July 29, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- NASA Administrator Charles Bolden has named planetary geologist Ellen Stofan the agency's chief scientist, effective Aug. 25. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) Stofan will be Bolden's principal advisor on the agency's science programs and science-related strategic planning and investments. Prior to her appointment, Stofan was vice president of Proxemy Research in Laytonsville, Md., and honorary...

Earth's Origins May Be Explained Through Mantle's 'Hidden Flux'
2013-07-17 14:46:32

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the more popular theories surrounding the formation of the planets involves the countless collisions of smaller objects in orbit around the sun 4.5 billion years ago. However, proponents of that theory are missing one thing: the Earth's chemical composition is distinctly different from the meteors that are currently striking the planet. Scientists have found that the lead-uranium ratio of meteors is much different than that of...

MESSENGER Team Names Ten Major Fault Scarps On Mercury
2013-06-08 08:29:31

April Flowers for redOrbit.com -- Your Universe Online Recently, the MESSENGER Science Team proposed names for 10 rupes on Mercury. The International Astronomical Union (IAU), which has been the arbiter of planetary and satellite nomenclature since 1919, approved the names. In keeping with the theme of naming rupes on Mercury, they all bear the names of ships of discovery. Rupes is the Latin word for cliff, which perfectly suits the formations on Mercury. They are long cliff-like...


Latest Planetary geology Reference Libraries

0_fc65ffe6a46cbd9f747aaf6b31e8e244
2010-10-29 20:31:07

Harrison Schmitt was a NASA astronaut, and is also an American geologist. He was born Harrison Hagan "Jack" Schmitt on July 3, 1935 in Santa Rita, New Mexico. After high school, he went to the California Institute of Technology and received a B.S. degree in science in 1957. He then went to Norway to study geology at the University of Oslo. In 1964, Schmitt earned a Ph.D. in geology from Harvard University. After receiving his doctorate, he worked at the U.S. Geological Survey's...

4_eccd202c9b173d8cc2bddcaa6629203b2
2004-10-19 04:45:40

The Planet Venus is the second planet from the sun. It is often called the evening star or morning star and is brighter than any object in the sky except the sun and the moon. Because its orbit lies between the sun and the orbit of the earth, Venus passes through phases like those of the moon, varying from a large bright crescent when the planet is near inferior conjunction (nearest the earth) to a smaller silvery disk when it is at superior conjunction (farthest from the earth). Since...

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