Quantcast

Latest Planetary science Stories

John Lennon Shines On: IAU Names Mercury Crater After Rock Legend
2013-12-20 13:34:02

Gerard LeBlond for redorbit.com - Your Universe Online John Lennon was born on October 9, 1940 in Liverpool, England. He started his first band, The Quarrymen, while still in high school. After Paul McCartney and George Harrison joined the band the name was changed to The Beatles. He and his band mates became rock legends, but John met a tragic end on December 8, 1980. Now Lennon, along with nine other notable celebrities of the past, have been honored by having impact craters on...

New Technique Measuring Exoplanet Mass
2013-12-19 15:52:43

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new technique developed by a team at MIT could help scientists determine the mass of exoplanets, using just their transmission spectra. Scientists have discovered more than 900 exoplanets outside our solar system so far, and more are being found every week. Hunting for exoplanets takes a combination of patience, the right equipment and technique. Space telescopes help keep watch for dimming starlight, indicating that an exoplanet...

Decades-old Mystery In Earth's Upper Atmosphere Solved
2013-12-18 14:51:49

University of California - Los Angeles New research published in the journal Nature resolves decades of scientific controversy over the origin of the extremely energetic particles known as ultra-relativistic electrons in the Earth's near-space environment and is likely to influence our understanding of planetary magnetospheres throughout the universe. Discovering the processes that control the formation and ultimate loss of these electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts — the rings...

Ursids To Light Up Night Skies One Week After Geminid Meteor Shower
2013-12-17 09:06:26

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Last weekend the night skies were lit up by the annual Geminid meteor shower. While not as brilliant and spectacular, another meteor shower is peaking this upcoming weekend, promising to give backyard astronomers a show of around 10 meteors per hour. The annual Ursid meteor shower is expected to peak on December 21, but will be occurring from December 17 to the 25th. The shower will be appearing to radiate out of the constellation of...

Vesta's Hidden Attractions Provided By Dawn
2013-12-17 08:01:02

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Some beauty is revealed only at a second glance. When viewed with the human eye, the giant asteroid Vesta, which was the object of scrutiny by the Dawn spacecraft from 2011 to 2012, is quite unspectacular color-wise. Vesta looks grayish, pitted by a variety of large and small craters. But scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany, have re-analyzed the images of this giant asteroid obtained by Dawn's...

Sun's Increasing Brightness Will Dry Out The Earth In A Billion Years
2013-12-17 04:36:50

[ Watch the Video: The Sun Will Evaporate Our Oceans Eventually ] Ranjini Raghunath for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One billion years from now, all the water on Earth could disappear, making it barren like Venus, and the culprit isn’t climate change. It’s the Sun, according to a new study published in the journal Nature. Scientists have previously predicted that, even without climate change, the Earth’s surface would still heat up, because of the Sun’s increasing...

Brown Dwarf Binary System May Include A Hidden Planet
2013-12-17 04:15:33

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Analysis of the two brown dwarfs located closest to the sun suggests that there could actually be a third, previously undetected planetary-mass object, according to research published as a letter to the editor in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. Brown dwarfs, which are failed stars that have a mass of less than 8 percent the mass of the sun, are not massive enough to burn hydrogen in their centers. The system at the...

Arctic Ice Improving
2013-12-16 15:27:28

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The European Space Agency’s (ESA) CryoSat satellite has delivered some good news about the Arctic sea ice this fall. New measurements taken by CryoSat show the volume of Arctic sea ice has significantly increased this fall, rising by about 50 percent compared to last year. Satellites have been showing a downward trend in the area of Arctic Ocean covered by ice over the past few decades, so the latest measurements are much welcomed news....

Where Brown Dwarfs End And Stars Begin
2013-12-15 04:37:49

John P. Millis, Ph.D. for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Stars form as interstellar gas accumulates, increasing in density and temperature. Eventually, the environment at the core of the object reaches a state where hydrogen begins fusing at a high enough rate that the outward radiation pressure and the inward gravitational force reach a balance, and a star is born. However, if the forming proto-star is not quite massive enough, the fusion process is not able to produce enough...


Latest Planetary science Reference Libraries

Planetary Astronomy
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Image Caption: Artistic concept of a planetary system. Credit: Wikipedia/NASA/JPL-Caltech The term Astronomy encompasses a broad range of topics, including the study of stars, galaxies, and planets. In order to focus on the different areas of study, many subfields of astronomy emerge. One such area is the study of planets known, appropriately, as Planetary Astronomy. Observational Planetary Astronomy Even within the field of Planetary Astronomy, there are several divisions to...

How Solar Cycles Impact Our Weather Here On Earth
2013-01-13 09:10:34

Solar cycles: what are they and why should we care about them? Solar cycles are made up of what are known as solar minimums (min) and solar maximums (max). We refer to a solar min at the time when the sun is not active with many sunspots, while a solar max is just the opposite when we see a large increase in sunspot activity. So how long do solar cycles last? Typically they run on what is known as an 11 year cycle from the max to the min and then start over again anew. As of 2012 we...

Planetary and Space Science
2012-05-28 10:21:45

Planetary and Space Science is a peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 1959 and published by Elsevier 15 times per year. As of May 2012, the editor-in-chief is Rita Schulz (The Netherlands). The journal publishes original research articles and short communications. The main focus is on solar system processes which encompass multiple areas of the natural sciences. Research that involves planetary and space sciences involves many disciplines. Celestial mechanics is part of these...

Physics Of The Earth And Planetary Interiors
2012-05-01 10:08:14

Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors is a biweekly published peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Elsevier. As of April 2012, co-editors are G. Aelfric (University of Bristol), K. Hirose (Tokyo Institute of Technology), M. Jellinek (University of British Columbia), and K. Zhang (University of Exeter). This journal focuses on the physical and chemical processes of planetary interiors. Topics covered include planetary physics, geodesy and geophysics. Publishing formats...

Geophysical Journal International
2012-04-29 19:47:50

Geophysical Journal International is a peer-reviewed scientific journal publish monthly by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society and the German Geophysical Society. The editor-in-chief is Jeannot Trampert of TA Utrecht, the Netherlands. The primary focus of this journal is fundamental research in Geophysics. Publishing formats are original research, research notes, letters, and book reviews. Coverage includes computational, theoretical, observational and applied...

More Articles (52 articles) »
Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
Related