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Latest Planktology Stories

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2009-07-23 09:00:00

For a long time scientists have observed the biological consequences of global climate change. One of the most famous symptoms is the shift of habitats from the equator further north or further south. More recent studies show that not only the habitats but also the size of organisms is affected. Dr. Martin Daufresne of the HYAX Lake Ecosystem Laboratory in Aix-en-Provence, France, as well as Prof. Ulrich Sommer and Dr. Kathrin Lengfellner of the Leibniz-Institute of Marine Sciences...

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2009-07-21 12:55:00

A study published Monday reported that fish have lost half their average body mass and smaller species are making up a larger proportion of European fish stocks as a result of global warming. Martin Daufresne of the Cemagref Public Agricultural and Environmental Research Institute in Lyon, France said, "Size is a fundamental characteristic that is linked to a number of biological functions, such as fecundity - the capacity to reproduce." Smaller fish tend to produce fewer eggs, and they also...

2009-07-09 09:21:18

New evidence for ice-free summers with intermittent winter sea ice in the Arctic Ocean during the Late Cretaceous "“ a period of greenhouse conditions - gives a glimpse of how the Arctic is likely to respond to future global warming.Records of past environmental change in the Arctic should help predict its future behaviour. The Late Cretaceous, the period between 100 and 65 million years ago leading up to the extinction of the dinosaurs, is crucial in this regard because levels of...

2009-07-07 15:20:00

Southampton scientists have demonstrated an unexpected role of iron in regulating biological production in the high-latitude North Atlantic. Their findings have important implications for our understanding of ocean-climate interactions.Tiny plant-like organisms called phytoplankton dominate biological production in the sunlit surface waters of the world's oceans and, through the process of photosynthesis, sequester large amounts of atmospheric carbon dioxide. A proportion of the carbon is...

d65d294ca999d753fef6494ce14516b51
2009-06-30 10:45:00

The blooming of toxic algae that occurs during the summer conceal a fight for life and death. Scientists at the University of Gothenburg propose in an article published in the journal PNAS that algal blooms are created when aggressive algae kill and injure their competitors in order to absorb the nutrients they contain."The behaviour of the algae can be compared to that of blood-sucking insects", says Per Jonsson of the Department of Marine Ecology.The blooming of toxic algae in the oceans...

e83a6928e8402c21e74bf9013db81c0e1
2009-06-20 09:10:56

IFM-GEOMAR-biogeochemists feed Saharan dust to enigmatic fertilizer plankton The tropical Atlantic waters around Cape Verde are very low in plant nutrients.  Nitrogen is in especially short supply and limits the growth of the phytoplankton, the tiny plants that are at the basis of the food chain in the ocean. In this area, the nutrients fall out from the sky: Trade winds carry Saharan dust rich in iron and phosphorus which can fertilize the surface of the ocean.  This was one of the...

2009-05-28 12:43:36

Researchers are using the U.S. space agency's Aqua satellite to conduct the first global analysis of the health and productivity of ocean plants. Ocean scientists can now remotely measure the amount of fluorescent red light emitted by phytoplankton and assess how efficiently these microscopic plants turn sunlight and nutrients into food through photosynthesis, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said. Single-celled phytoplankton fuel nearly all ocean ecosystems and the health of...

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2009-05-28 12:40:00

A unique signal detected by NASA's Aqua satellite is helping researchers check the health and productivity of ocean plants around the world. Fluorescent red light emitted by ocean phytoplankton and detected by Aqua reveals how efficiently the microscopic plants are turning sunlight and nutrients into food through photosynthesis. "This is the first direct measurement of the health of the phytoplankton in the ocean," says Michael Behrenfeld, a biologist at Oregon State University who...

7012c9bce937e5f36f16495cdd2ee2201
2009-05-07 09:05:40

Plankton blooms do not send atmospheric carbon to the deep ocean Oceanographers Jim Bishop and Todd Wood of the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have measured the fate of carbon particles originating in plankton blooms in the Southern Ocean, using data that deep-diving Carbon Explorer floats collected around the clock for well over a year. Their study reveals that most of the carbon from lush plankton blooms never reaches the deep ocean. The surprising...

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2009-04-10 08:05:36

Study shows how algae may cope with environmental change Scientists from two-dozen research organizations led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) have decoded genomes of two algal strains, highlighting the genes enabling them to capture carbon and maintain its delicate balance in the oceans. These findings, from a team led by Alexandra Z. Worden of MBARI and published in the April 10 edition of the...


Latest Planktology Reference Libraries

45_9dcdfc9da62991a8f200f2f82f8638d9
2014-01-12 00:00:00

A salp is a barrel-shaped, free-floating tunicate (any living organism which has a saclike body enclosed in a thick membrane or tunic with two openings or siphons for the ingress and egress of water). It moves by contracting which pumps water through its body. The salp strains the water with internal feeding filters as it goes through the body. It consumes phytoplankton that are strained from the water. Salps are common throughout equatorial, temperate, and colder seas. They are most often...

39_6e87e3fa1b5a996861bc65cc76c916fa
2007-04-03 00:34:20

The South American pilchard, Sardinops sagax, is a sardine of the Family Clupeidae, the only member of the genus Sardinops, found in the indo-Pacific oceans. Their length is up to 15.75 in (40 cm). It has a number of other common names: Australian pilchard, Blue pilchard, Blue-bait, Californian pilchard, Chilean sardine, Japanese pilchard, Pacific sardine, and Southern African pilchard. The South American pilchard is a coastal species that forms large schools. Coloration is blue green on...

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Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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