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Latest Planktology Stories

2008-12-18 15:48:24

Concern about increasing ocean acidification has often focused on its potential effects on coral reefs, but broader disruptions of biological processes in the oceans may be more significant, according to Donald Potts, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and an expert in coral reef ecology and marine biodiversity. Potts gave an invited talk on "Geobiological Responses to Ocean Acidification" at the Fall Meeting of the American...

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2008-12-15 16:21:57

MIT researchers have created a microbial ecosystem smaller than a stick of gum that sheds new light on the plankton-eat-plankton world at the bottom of the aquatic food chain. The work, reported in the January print issue of American Naturalist, may lead to better predictions of marine microbes' global-scale influence on climate. Through photosynthesis and uptake of carbon compounds, diverse planktonic marine microorganisms "” too small to be seen with the naked eye "” help...

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2008-11-11 15:45:00

Researchers say they are now using satellite monitoring of marine environments for predicting cholera outbreaks. Cholera outbreaks follow seasonal increases in sea temperature, scientists said, and this could provide an early warning system for India and Bangladesh where cholera epidemics occur regularly. Tiny animals, which increase in number with sea temperature rise, bring the cholera pathogen into the drinking water supply. The satellites were able to pick up sea temperature changes in...

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2008-10-16 14:29:54

Diatoms, mighty microscopic algae, have profound influence on climate, producing 20 percent of the oxygen we breathe by capturing atmospheric carbon and in so doing, countering the greenhouse effect. Since their evolutionary origins these photosynthetic wonders have come to acquire advantageous genes from bacterial, animal and plant ancestors enabling them to thrive in today's oceans. These findings, based on the analysis of the latest sequenced diatom genome, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, are...

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2008-09-04 10:50:00

A team of scientists is studying the complex ocean upwelling process by mimicking nature "“ pumping cold, nutrient-rich water from deep within the Pacific Ocean and releasing it into surface waters near Hawaii that lack the nitrogen and phosphorous necessary to support high biological production. The researchers are harnessing the power of the ocean to conduct their experiments, using the up-and-down motion of waves to pump deep water to the surface. Their next step is to create a pump...

2008-08-13 18:00:36

By Anonymous The brilliant beamlines of the Australian Synchrotron are finding a host of environmental applications, from studying the chemistry of the upper atmosphere to developing better catalysts for hydrogen production. Detecting and precisely locating specific atoms and molecules is one of the things synchrotrons do best. That makes them very useful for many environmental applications. The Australian Synchrotron's microspectroscopy beamline, for instance, can be used as a probe to...

2008-07-21 21:00:22

A seasonal bloom of ocean plankton is pulling more carbon dioxide than previously thought from the atmosphere into the Atlantic Ocean, U.S. researchers said. The bloom -- nurtured by the Amazon River -- may be enough to turn the tropical Atlantic from a net source of atmospheric carbon into a net carbon sink that removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, New Scientist reported. Ajit Subramaniam, an oceanographer at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in Palisades, N.Y., and his colleagues...

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2008-07-14 18:35:00

It's summertime and people are flocking to the coasts around the country. But when summer storms arrive, it's not only beach-goers who are affected; the rains can also have an impact on living creatures far below the ocean surface. Summer storms sweep fertilizers into the rivers and streams and carry them to the shoreline. Once the plumes of storm and river runoff reach the coast, the nutrients in fertilizers can feed tiny ocean plants, called phytoplankton, which can bloom and create "dead...

2008-06-14 06:00:13

By Anonymous OCEANOGRAPHY An ocean odor that affects global climate also gathers reef fish to feed as they "eavesdrop" on events that might lead them to food, according to a study by the University of California, Davis. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is given off by algae and phytoplankton, microscopic one-celled plants that float in the ocean. Release of DMSP usually indicates that tiny animals in the plankton are feeding on the algae, or a massive growth of algae- an algal bloom-has...

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2008-05-20 08:57:22

First identified in 1899, y-larvae have been one of the greatest zoological mysteries for over a century. No one has ever found an adult of these puzzling crustaceans, despite the plethora of these larvae in plankton, leading generations of marine zoologists to wonder just what y-larvae grow up to be. A study published in BioMed Central's open access journal, BMC Biology, reports the transformation of the larvae into a previously unseen, wholly un-crustacean-like, parasitic form.Y larvae, or...


Latest Planktology Reference Libraries

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2014-01-12 00:00:00

A salp is a barrel-shaped, free-floating tunicate (any living organism which has a saclike body enclosed in a thick membrane or tunic with two openings or siphons for the ingress and egress of water). It moves by contracting which pumps water through its body. The salp strains the water with internal feeding filters as it goes through the body. It consumes phytoplankton that are strained from the water. Salps are common throughout equatorial, temperate, and colder seas. They are most...

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2007-04-03 00:34:20

The South American pilchard, Sardinops sagax, is a sardine of the Family Clupeidae, the only member of the genus Sardinops, found in the indo-Pacific oceans. Their length is up to 15.75 in (40 cm). It has a number of other common names: Australian pilchard, Blue pilchard, Blue-bait, Californian pilchard, Chilean sardine, Japanese pilchard, Pacific sardine, and Southern African pilchard. The South American pilchard is a coastal species that forms large schools. Coloration is blue green on...

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