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Latest Planktology Stories

Ancient Climate Change Evidence From Fossilized Plankton
2013-10-26 05:41:11

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Climate change dating as far back as hundreds of million years ago was recorded in the shells of ancient oceanic plankton, according to new research published in the journal Earth and Planetary Sciences Letters. Typically, scientists analyze polar ice in search of information about the planet’s temperature and atmosphere, but the oldest Antarctic ice core records only date back to approximately 800,000 years ago. In the new...

Jellyfish Numbers Shifting Climate Patterns
2013-10-24 15:47:31

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Every month, 8 to 12 days after each full moon, Waikiki Beach is invaded by large numbers of box jellyfish. After witnessing the phenomenon countless times, Honolulu lifeguard Landy Blair, in conjunction with researchers at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa, started tracking the numbers of jellyfish that invade the beach with each cycle. Over 170 full moons after they began, the team’s published findings in the latest issue of PLOS...

Coral Chemical Affects Climate
2013-10-24 15:24:33

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Anyone who has ever been to the ocean knows that signature smell of sea water. One of the molecules responsible for that smell is actually derived from a chemical made by tiny coral animals called dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP). According to a new study in the journal Nature, Australian marine scientists have discovered the first evidence that DMSP plays a major role in local climate. The molecule offers the coral animals cellular...

Tiny Sea Creatures Headed For Extinction, Could Take Local Fisheries With Them
2013-10-18 09:46:54

Deakin University A species of one of the world’s tiniest creatures, ocean plankton, is heading for extinction as it struggles to adapt to changes in sea temperature. And it may take local fisheries with it. Research led by Deakin University (Warrnambool, Australia) and Swansea University (UK) has found that a species of cold water plankton in the North Atlantic, that is a vital food source for fish such as cod and hake, is in decline as the oceans warm. This will put pressure on the...

Phytoplankton In The Southern Ocean
2013-09-19 04:45:00

[ Watch the Video: Phytoplankton Observed By NASA Satellites ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Until now, NASA satellites might have missed as much as 50 percent of the phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean. This would make it far more difficult to estimate the potential carbon capture of this vast area of the sea. A new study from the University of Tasmania's Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), published in the Journal of Geophysical Research, has...

Tiny Plankton May Have Big Impact On Climate
2013-09-13 14:28:37

European Geosciences Union As the climate changes and oceans' acidity increases, tiny plankton seem set to succeed. An international team of marine scientists has found that the smallest plankton groups thrive under elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. This could cause an imbalance in the food web as well as decrease ocean CO2 uptake, an important regulator of global climate. The results of the study, conducted off the coast of Svalbard, Norway, in 2010, are now compiled in a special...

Rising Temperatures Could Upset Natural Ocean Cycles
2013-09-09 04:15:09

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Rising water temperatures will have an adverse impact on plankton, serving as the catalyst for a series of events that will upset the balance of essential oceanic chemical cycles, according to new research published in Sunday’s edition of the journal Nature Climate Change. Scientists from the University of East Anglia (UEA) in the UK examined the impact that ocean temperatures can have on the plankton ecosystems found in the...

Scientists Create Global Atlas On Oceanic Plankton
2013-07-19 10:05:40

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An international group of scientists has created a global atlas of oceanic plankton -- from bacteria to krill -- by recording times, places and concentrations of the organism's occurrences. Over 70 percent of the world's surface is covered by the oceans. Compared with terrestrial ecosystems, the animals and plant species of the oceans have been researched relatively little. Because of this, the knowledge base concerning the...

Ancient Algal Bloom Mystery Solved
2013-07-15 15:05:24

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An ancient bloom of life that occurred just after the last ice age isn't what it seemed at first, according to new research in the journal Nature Geoscience. Scientists had long believed that the bloom, which occurred around 14,000 years ago, was spurred by rising sea levels washing iron into the ocean. However, the new study suggested that a "perfect storm" of conditions allowed for the bloom to happen, and not simply the abundance of...

Phytoplankton Ocean Turbulence Social Mixers
2013-07-15 12:58:35

[Watch the video: Phytoplankton Social Mixers] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The motility of phytoplankton allows the tiny ocean plants to determine their fate in ocean turbulence, according to scientists at MIT and Oxford University. Researchers wrote in the journal Nature Communications that the individual vortices that make up ocean turbulence are like social mixers for phytoplankton. This social mixer brings similar cells into close proximity, helping to...


Latest Planktology Reference Libraries

45_9dcdfc9da62991a8f200f2f82f8638d9
2014-01-12 00:00:00

A salp is a barrel-shaped, free-floating tunicate (any living organism which has a saclike body enclosed in a thick membrane or tunic with two openings or siphons for the ingress and egress of water). It moves by contracting which pumps water through its body. The salp strains the water with internal feeding filters as it goes through the body. It consumes phytoplankton that are strained from the water. Salps are common throughout equatorial, temperate, and colder seas. They are most often...

39_6e87e3fa1b5a996861bc65cc76c916fa
2007-04-03 00:34:20

The South American pilchard, Sardinops sagax, is a sardine of the Family Clupeidae, the only member of the genus Sardinops, found in the indo-Pacific oceans. Their length is up to 15.75 in (40 cm). It has a number of other common names: Australian pilchard, Blue pilchard, Blue-bait, Californian pilchard, Chilean sardine, Japanese pilchard, Pacific sardine, and Southern African pilchard. The South American pilchard is a coastal species that forms large schools. Coloration is blue green on...

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Word of the Day
bellycheer
  • Good cheer; viands.
  • To revel; to feast.
The word 'bellycheer' may come from 'belle cheer', "good cheer".
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