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Latest Plankton Stories

Dead Jellyfish Help Absorb Carbon Dioxide
2013-05-29 09:55:33

Rebekah Eliason for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Humans constantly produce carbon dioxide (CO2), both naturally and as a byproduct of industrial processes. The ocean absorbs about 25 percent of the carbon dioxide emitted by human activity. Tiny organisms called plankton live in the ocean and break down this natural greenhouse gas by converting itinto sugars and carbohydrates through photosynthesis. In order to understand the efficiency of the ocean´s carbon...

Organisms In 33.6 Million Year Old Ice Pack Evolved To Survive
2013-05-28 09:17:24

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers publishing a paper in the latest issue of the journal Science have found through Antarctic planktonic ice core examinations that the continental ice cap formed more than 33 million years ago. Scientists from the Andalusian Institute of Earth Sciences (IACT), a joint collaboration between the University of Granada and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), said the seasonal primary productivity of planktonic...

Researchers Uncover Genetic Payload Of Ancient Plankton In Black Sea Sediments
2013-05-07 10:23:32

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Sorting through the vast amounts of genetic data from the Black Sea sediment record, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) marine paleoecologist Marco Coolen was astounded by the variety of past plankton species that left behind their genetic makeup. This vast amount of data is called the plankton paleome. The Black Sea is semi-isolated from other bodies of water, and highly sensitive to climate driven environmental changes....

cape cod sea surface temps
2013-04-27 06:55:54

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to the most recent Ecosystem Advisory issued by NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC), sea surface temperatures (SSTs) for 2012 in the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem were the highest recorded in 150 years. These record SSTs are the latest in a trend of above average temperatures observed during the spring and summer seasons and part of a pattern of elevated temperatures in the Northwest Atlantic. This trend...

Antarctic Ecosystem Caused Rapid Evolution 041913
2013-04-19 09:39:52

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The development of the sea-ice ecosystem in the circum-Antarctic Southern Ocean may have triggered further adaptation and evolution of larger organisms such as baleen whales and penguins, according to a new study published Thursday in the journal Science. The area´s ecosystem can be traced back to the emergence of the Antarctic ice sheets some 33.6 million years ago and plays an important role in global marine food webs and...

Ocean Plankton Gobbling Up Twice The Carbon As Previously Believed
2013-03-18 11:06:17

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Carbon dioxide is the leading driver of disruptive climate change on a global scale. And without the help of some organisms in the natural world the global climate could be a lot worse than it is now. Now, new research shows that trillions of plankton near the surface of warm waters are more carbon-rich than previously believed. These researchers, led by scientists at the University of California-Irvine, suggest that the tiny...

Unique Experiment Uses Huge Plastic Containers To Study Ocean Acidification
2013-03-13 16:08:19

AlphaGalileo Foundation To study the effects of ocean acidification, ten huge plastic containers called mesocosms are placed in the Gullmar Fjord in Sweden. The project is unique: mesocosms of this size have never been used for such a long period of time. The experiment is part of a worldwide research project, and includes researchers from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. This is the largest and longest experiment on the impact of climate change on marine ecosystems that have been...

Smartphone App Allows Seamen To Track Phytoplankton For Science
2013-02-24 08:08:54

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers at the Plymouth University Marine Institute have developed a new smartphone app that they claim will allow regular folks to help scientists track the impact of climate change on phytoplankton. In a statement released Friday, the university reports that scientists are concerned that the tiny organisms, which are at the bottom end of the marine life food chain, could be decreasing in numbers due to increasing sea...

Movement Of Seawater Affects How Marine Bacteria Absorb Organic Material
2012-11-01 14:39:18

National Science Foundation New research shows that ocean turbulence directly affects the ability of microscopic marine organisms to recycle organic material back into the food web. Results of the study are published in this week's issue of the journal Science. Scientists John Taylor of Cambridge University and Roman Stocker at MIT found that there's a relationship between the natural movement of water in the ocean and the ability of marine bacteria to act as recyclers. "The...

Warming Oceans Will Play Major Role In Less Phytoplankton Diversity
2012-10-26 07:33:14

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Phytoplankton (plant wanderers), organisms that exist in the sunlit layer of the world´s oceans, are important for the sustainability of the aquatic food web. However, future warming oceans could significantly alter the populations of these important organisms, further impacting climate change. Since phytoplankton play a major role in the food chain and the world´s carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous cycles, a significant...


Latest Plankton Reference Libraries

Mediterranean feather star, Antedon mediterranea
2013-05-18 06:26:42

The Mediterranean feather star is a filter feeder that obtains food by straining suspended matter and food particles from water. The star has a stalk that has up to forty tendrils, (threadlike organs) which help the star cling to hard surfaces. The “body” of the star is called a calyx and is shaped like a small cup. This calyx is surrounded by feathery pinnules bearing arms. These arms are quite unique in the fact that they can regenerate if one should get broken off; these arms extend to...

Chilean Sea Urchin, Loxechinus albus
2013-01-28 14:52:23

Image Caption: Chilean Sea Urchin, Loxechinus albus. Credit: Dentren/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0) The Chilean sea urchin (Loxechinus albus) is a species that can be found along the coastlines of Chile and Peru. It is typically found in shallow waters at or below the tide level, buried in sand or lying just on top of it. This species is often associated with Macrocystis pyrifera, a type of kelp. It is most often found in more open spaces. The Chilean sea urchin can reach an average width of...

0_36648507753f8c7e3c33d3c137060fc4
2009-06-19 13:00:04

The White-spotted jellyfish is also known as the Australian spotted jellyfish (Phyllorhiza punctata). The jellyfish feeds primarily on assorted snail species and thrives in the southwestern Pacific. The bell of the White-spotted jellyfish averages 17-19 inches in diameter but there had been a maximum reported size of 24 inches. However, on Sunset Beach in North Carolina in October, 2007, a White-spotted jellyfish was found on the shore measuring in at 28 inches, perhaps the largest to...

39_68ab5781f79103bd6c23c27f59baafb3
2007-03-26 13:57:44

The Tarakihi or Jackass morwong, Nemadactylus macropterus, is a morwong of the genus Nemadactylus found off the coast of southern Australia, the Atlantic coast of South America, and all around New Zealand to depths of about 1312.34 ft (400 m). Its length is between 11.81 and 23.62 in (30 and 60 cm). The Tarakihi is similar to the Porae but with a silver body color and a distinctive black saddle immediately behind the head. Their diet is similar to that of the Porae but also with a wide...

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Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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