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Latest Plant morphology Stories

2011-12-20 22:43:43

Plant roots are fascinating plant organs — they not only anchor the plant, but are also the world's most efficient mining companies. Roots live in darkness and direct the activities of the other organs, as well as interact with the surrounding environment. Charles Darwin posited in The Power of Movement of Plants that the root system acts as a plant's brain. Due to the difficulty of accessing root tissue in intact live plants, research of these hidden parts has always lagged behind...

2011-12-15 14:00:00

Almstead Tree & Shrub Care Co. offers tips to prepare your landscape for winter while saving time and money. New Rochelle, N.Y. (PRWEB) December 15, 2011 Almstead Tree & Shrub Care Co. offers tips to prepare your landscape for winter while saving time and money. Winter is a season full of holiday cheer, festive gatherings and, in our part of the country, beautiful snow-covered landscapes. When it comes to outdoor maintenance, the image of a snow shovel most likely comes to mind...

Botanists Answer Mystery Of Glowing Buttercups
2011-12-15 09:41:34

As a child, did you ever shine a buttercup flower under your chin and witness a yellow glow to test whether you or your friends like butter? Well scientists have taken a closer look to better understand how this works and discovered the distinctive glossiness of the buttercup flower is related to its unique anatomical structure, according to a study published in the Royal Society journal Interface. The bright and glossy appearance of the buttercup petals is the result of the interplay...

2011-12-14 11:43:44

New research sheds light on children´s game and provides insight into pollination Scientists have found that the distinctive glossiness of the buttercup flower (Ranunculus repens), which children like to shine under the chin to test whether their friends like butter, is related to its unique anatomical structure. Their findings were published today, 14 December, in the Royal Society journal Interface. The researchers discovered that the buttercup petal's unique bright and glossy...

2011-12-12 21:57:59

Treated seedlings are healthier, more vigorous after transplanting The quality of agricultural seedlings is important to crop growth and yield after transplantation. Good quality seedlings exhibit characteristics such as thick stems, thick leaves, dark green leaves, and large white roots. Scientists have long known that plant development and physiology are strongly influenced by the light spectrum, which affects seedling structure. Raising seedlings irradiated with blue light has been...

2011-12-12 17:47:24

Dormant seeds in the soil detect and respond to seasonal changes in soil temperature by changing their sensitivity to plant hormones, new research by the University of Warwick has found. This sensitivity alters the depth of dormancy, indicating to the seed when it is the right time of year to germinate and grow. The seeds of common weeds can survive in the soil in a dormant state for years, in some cases decades, spelling issues for food security when they emerge to compete with crops....

For Stronger Corn, Make It All Female
2011-12-01 05:00:02

A Purdue University researcher has taken corn off steroids and found that the results might lead to improvements in that and other crops. Burkhard Schulz, an assistant professor of horticulture and landscape architecture, wanted to understand the relationship between natural brassinosteroids - a natural plant steroid hormone - and plant architecture, specifically plant height. Schulz said corn could benefit by becoming shorter and sturdier, but the mechanisms that control those traits are...

2011-11-18 03:43:02

A new study of flower petals shows evolution in action, and contradicts more that 60 years of scientific thought. The findings are reported by a scientist from UC Santa Barbara and a research team from Harvard University in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B this week. Columbine flowers, known as Aquilegia, evolved several lengths of petal spurs that match the tongue lengths of their pollinators, including bees, hummingbirds, and hawkmoths. The petal spurs are shaped like a tubular...

2011-11-18 02:35:24

New model offers practical information for growers, advancements for horticultural research In peach trees, as in other plants, the energy used to create carbohydrates that support growth and development comes from solar radiation through the process of photosynthesis. Peach tree productivity is therefore dependent on the tree's photosynthetic efficiency and effectiveness in distributing and using carbohydrates. A basic knowledge of carbon assimilation and partitioning concepts at the...


Latest Plant morphology Reference Libraries

California spicebush, Calycanthus occidentalis
2014-02-07 08:42:40

Calycanthus is a genus of flowering plant found in North America. The plant belongs to the Calycanthaceae family. It is commonly known as the Sweetshrub. The genus includes 2 species that are accepted by the Flora of North America and 2 that may or may not be, depending on taxonomic interpretation. Calycanthus is a shrub that grows around 6 to 12 feet tall. The plant contains entire and opposite leaves measuring 2 to 6 inches long and .8 t0 2.5 inches wide. Its flowers bloom in early...

Persian cyclamen, Cyclamen persicum
2014-01-08 20:39:58

Cyclamen persicum is a flowering, herbaceous plant from the Myrsinaceae family. It is commonly referred to as the Persian cyclamen. C. persicum is a tuberous plant. A tuber is a modified plant structure that is enlarged to store nutrients. The flowers and leaves come from buds at the top of the tuber. Roots emerge from the sides and bottom. Wild specimens have heart-shaped leaves that grow as long as 6 inches. They are usually green in color, with a light green marbling effect on the...

Kelp Forest
2013-04-19 19:29:03

Kelp forests are areas that are underwater with a high density of kelp. They’re recognized as one of the most dynamic and productive ecosystems on Earth. Smaller regions of anchored kelp are known as kelp beds. Kelp forests can be found worldwide throughout polar and temperate coastal oceans. In the year 2007, kelp forests were discovered in tropical waters near Ecuador as well. While they are physically formed by brown macroalgae of the order Laminariales, kelp forests offer a unique...

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2009-06-17 12:38:51

The Lily of the Nile or Calla Lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica) is a species of plant native to southern Africa in Lesotho, South Africa, and Swaziland. It has been introduced to Western Australia where it occurs in high periodical water tables and sandy soil. Several hybrids have been established and introduced to other areas around the world. Some hybrids are more suited to cooler climates. One hybrid, Crowborough, grows better in the British Isles and the northwestern United States than it...

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2009-06-17 12:28:21

The Coco (Fagara coco or Zanthoxylum coco) is a species of evergreen tree native to Argentina and Bolivia. It grows in wild, mostly hilly, spinniferous (thorny or spiny) forests. Its habitat is found along the hilly forest of the Sierra Pampeana. This plant is found either in small isolated groups or standing alone. Other common names for this plant are cochucho or "smelly sauco". The Coco is a medium sized tree ranging from 20 to 26.25 feet tall. Its foliage is abundant and has paired...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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