Quantcast
Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 14:04 EDT

Latest Plant pathology Stories

2012-07-24 02:23:36

DAVIS, Calif., July 24, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Marrone Bio Innovations, Inc. (MBI), a leading global provider of natural pest management products for the agricultural and water treatment markets, has filed a patent on the latest discovery from its biopesticide screening platform: a new species of bacteria from a known genus that kills plant parasitic nematodes (also known as roundworms) such as root knot and sting nematodes. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20120628/SF31203LOGO) "Our...

2012-06-13 14:59:07

Researchers have identified the set of tools an infectious microbe uses to persuade a plant to open the windows and let the bug and all of its friends inside. The microbe is Pseudomonas syringae, a successful bacterial pathogen that produces characteristic brown spots in more than 50 different species of plant. The signal it uses is a molecule called coronatine, which to the plant looks just like its own jasmonic acid, a signal that is part of the plant's immune system. The pathogen...

2012-04-11 22:32:18

More than 600 million people could be fed each year by halting the spread of fungal diseases in the world's five most important crops, according to research published today in the journal Nature. Furthermore, data reviewed by scientists suggests that in 70% of cases where infectious disease causes the extinction of a type of animal or plant, an emerging species of fungus is behind the problem. Evidence suggests this figure is increasing. The scientists behind the study, from the...

2012-01-18 06:30:00

DAVIS, Calif., Jan. 18, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Marrone Bio Innovations today announced that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has approved a significant label expansion for Regalia(®), a biofungicide that boosts plants' natural defenses to fight fungal and bacterial diseases. The label expansion includes new soil applications, instructions for yield improvement in corn and soybeans, along with additional crops and target pathogens. "This label expansion is an important...

2011-12-21 13:05:19

From improving food security to their use as biotechnology power horses, Trichoderma fungi are increasingly being exploited by industry. Current advances in the field are brought together and highlighted in a special issue of Microbiology published online on 27 December. Trichoderma are free-living fungi widely used in agricultural biotechnology. Some species of Trichoderma are specifically used as biocontrol agents to control plant pathogens including Fusarium species. Their success is...

2011-12-09 11:51:09

A protein called enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) plays a central role in plants' ability to defend themselves from pathogens. But in the almost two decades since it was discovered, how EDS1 works at the molecular level has been a mystery. Solving the mystery will help scientists enhance disease resistance in crops. Two papers published in the Dec. 9 issue of Science (http://www.sciencemag.org/magazine) demonstrate how EDS1 activates different components of the plant immune system,...

2011-12-09 11:43:55

Discovery could lead to improved disease resistance in food crops Researchers at the University of Missouri have found a key process in a plant's immune system response that may help future crops fight off dangerous diseases. "We study how Arabidopsis, a common weed related to the mustard plant, fends off infectious agents," said Walter Gassmann, professor of plant sciences and researcher for the Christopher S. Bond Life Sciences Center and Interdisciplinary Plant Group. "We have...

2011-11-30 14:56:23

Planting tall fescue grass as a ground cover in peach orchards helps protect peach trees from nematodes that attack tree roots, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists. In a study published in the Journal of Nematology in 2010, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) plant pathologists Andy Nyczepir at the Southeastern Fruit and Tree Nut Research Laboratory in Byron, Ga., and Susan Meyer at the Nematology Laboratory in Beltsville, Md., tested several tall fescue varieties...

2011-11-08 10:31:32

A 79-year-old collection of fungal cultures and the U.S. Forest Service's Northern Research Stationare part of a team that will sequence 1,000 fungal genomes in the next 5 years. Dan Lindner, a research plant pathologist with the Northern Research Station's Center for Forest Mycology Research (CFMR), is one of 13 scientists participating in the '1000 Fungal Genomes' project, which in collaboration with the Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute will sequence two species from...

2011-11-04 22:51:05

For decades, scientists and farmers have attempted to understand how a bacterial pathogen continues to damage tomatoes despite numerous agricultural attempts to control its spread. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato is the causative agent of bacterial speck disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), a disease that occurs worldwide and causes severe reduction in fruit yield and quality, particularly during cold and wet springs. In the spring of 2010, for example, an outbreak in Florida and...


Latest Plant pathology Reference Libraries

Soybean Cyst Nematode, Heterodera glycines
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) is a parasitic worm that infects soybean plants, and other legumes, across the world. It is thought to be native to Asia, but was found in the United States in 1954 and in Colombia in the 1980’s. It can be found in Italy and Iran and its most recent sightings have occurred in Brazil and Argentina, two major areas where soybeans are grown. These worms are highly damaging to American soybean crops, costing the industry as much as 500 thousand...

More Articles (1 articles) »