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Latest Plant pathology Stories

2011-10-17 17:21:36

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have characterized the molecular mechanism behind some plants' ability to resist rice blast, a fungal disease that affects cereal grain crops such as rice, wheat, rye and barley and can cause yield losses of up to 30 percent. The fungus has been found in 85 countries worldwide, including the United States. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) plant pathologist Yulin Jia at the agency's Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Center in Stuttgart,...

2011-09-01 17:06:14

Genetic detective work by an international group of researchers may have solved a decades-long mystery of the source of a devastating tree-killing fungus that has hit six of the world´s seven continents. In a study published today (Thursday, Sept. 1) in the peer-reviewed journal Phytopathology, California emerged as the top suspect for the pathogen, Seiridium cardinale, that is the cause of cypress canker disease. It was in California´s San Joaquin Valley in 1928 that S....

2011-08-23 19:56:16

A U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientist has created a new weapon in the war being waged against the potato cyst nematode-a diagnostic test that identifies the type of nematode infesting a grower's field. Xiaohong Wang, a molecular biologist with the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture and Health in Ithaca, N.Y., has filed a patent application on the monitoring tool, developed in part by cloning and sequencing key genes. ARS is USDA's...

2011-07-28 23:20:44

Every year, plant diseases wipe out millions of tons of crops, lead to the waste of valuable water resources and cause farmers to spend tens of billions of dollars battling them. Now a new discovery from a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill-led research team may help tip the war between plants and pathogens in favor of flora. The finding "“ published in the July 29, 2011, issue of the journal Science "“ suggests that while pathogens employ a diverse arsenal of weapons,...

2011-07-12 12:57:22

Plants, too, have an immune system that protects them against diseases. The early detection of pathogens and the subsequent immune response, in particular at the cell wall, work as a protective shield. However, the pathogens that cause plant diseases have their weapons, too. Some are able to suppress the natural cell wall reaction in plants. "One particularly ingenious attacker, powdery mildew, can even reprogram cells in such a way that they adapt their architecture and metabolism to...

2011-05-03 22:41:54

Fungi play significant ecological and economic roles. They can break down organic matter, cause devastating agricultural blights, enter into symbiotic relationships to protect and nourish plants, or offer a tasty repast. For industrial applications, fungi provide a source of enzymes to catalyze such processes as generating biofuels from plant biomass. One large fungal group with such enzymes are the rust plant pathogens which cannot survive on their own so they use crops as hosts, leading to...

2011-03-28 22:48:04

Breakthrough research by UC Riverside plant pathologist offers a clue How exactly bacterial pathogens cause diseases in plants remains a mystery and continues to frustrate scientists working to solve this problem. Now Wenbo Ma, a young plant pathologist at the University of California, Riverside, has performed research on the soybean plant in the lab that makes major inroads into our understanding of plant-pathogen interactions, a rapidly developing area among the plant sciences. Her...

2011-01-19 23:22:00

Scientists are reporting a key advance toward development of a way to combat the terrible plant diseases that caused the Irish potato famine and still inflict billions of dollars of damage to crops each year around the world. Their study appears in ACS' bi-weekly journal Organic Letters. Teck-Peng Loh and colleagues point out that the Phytophthora fungi cause extensive damage to food crops such as potatoes and soybeans as well as to ornamental plants like azaleas and rhododendrons. One...

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2010-12-10 06:10:00

New research finds that crop-killing mildews are able to sneak into plants undetected as "stealth bombers" by shedding genes to conceal themselves thus thwarting the plants' defenses. In a pair of studies, researchers mapped the genomes of two of the plant-killing mildews, and then described how the diseases shed giveaway genes to trigger an immune attack in the host plants. Although powdery mildew plagues seem to come out of nowhere,  they can devastate barley, corn, grapes, potatoes...

2010-12-09 20:01:20

Scientists have sequenced the genome of a major fungal disease that affects barley and other cereal crops, a breakthrough that could lead to significant advances in our understanding of how plant diseases evolve Scientists have sequenced the genome of a major fungal disease that affects barley and other cereal crops, a breakthrough that could lead to significant advances in our understanding of how plant diseases evolve. The research, published today in the journal Science, suggests that...


Latest Plant pathology Reference Libraries

Soybean Cyst Nematode, Heterodera glycines
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) is a parasitic worm that infects soybean plants, and other legumes, across the world. It is thought to be native to Asia, but was found in the United States in 1954 and in Colombia in the 1980’s. It can be found in Italy and Iran and its most recent sightings have occurred in Brazil and Argentina, two major areas where soybeans are grown. These worms are highly damaging to American soybean crops, costing the industry as much as 500 thousand...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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