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Latest Plant physiology Stories

2010-09-27 17:25:27

Nectar production in lima beans depends on light quality Flowering plants produce nectar to attract insect pollinators. Some plant species, such as Lima bean, also secrete nectar from so-called extrafloral nectaries to attract ants which in turn fend off herbivores. Scientists of the Max Planck Institute in Jena, Germany, have discovered that the production of extrafloral nectar is light dependent. They have shown that the plants are able not only to distinguish between day and night, but...

2010-09-03 12:05:00

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C., Sept. 3 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As fat summer tomatoes dangle in profusion from vines in gardens and farms across the country, researchers at Wake Forest University are looking for a way to make future harvests hold up better against drought or lack of nutrients. But the tomatoes these researchers study, with names like Never Ripe and Green Ripe, are mutants that will never achieve that wonderful red that makes a perfect summer meal for many foodies. That's because...

2010-08-24 13:55:32

A biosensor utilizing black platinum and carbon nanotubes developed at Purdue University will help give scientists a better understanding of how the plant hormone auxin regulates root growth and seedling establishment. Marshall Porterfield, an associate professor of agricultural and biological engineering and biomedical engineering, created a new sensor to detect the movement of auxin along a plant's root surface in real time without damaging the plants. The nanomaterials at the sensor's tip...

2010-08-04 13:46:57

Charles Darwin described the Venus Flytrap as 'one of the most wonderful plants in the world.' It's also one of the fastest as many an unfortunate insect taking a stroll across a leaf has discovered. But what powers this speed? Dr Andrej Pavlovič of Comenius University, Slovakia, has been studying the plants with the help of some specialised equipment and a few unlucky insects. In the wild the Venus Flytrap grows in the bogs and savannahs of North and South...

2010-08-03 07:30:00

VANCOUVER, Aug. 3 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ - Western Pacific Resources Corp. (WRP - TSXV): Warwick Smith, President of Western Pacific Minerals is pleased to report additional gold assays from ongoing sampling at the Company's Mineral Gulch project in Idaho. Highlights of the most recent results include: - MG-ES-052 which returned 3.7 g/t Au over 6.1m from the B Pit. - MG-ES-053 which returned 4.3 g/t Au over 5.5m from the B Pit. - MG-ES-077 which returned 2.5...

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2010-07-20 10:25:18

Grains, vegetables and fruit taste delicious and are important sources of energy. However, humans cannot digest the main component of plants - the cellulose in the cell wall. Even in ruminants, animals that can metabolize cellulose, the digestibility of the cell wall plays a crucial role in feed utilization. Scientists are therefore looking for ways of increasing the digestibility of animal feed, and of utilizing plant cell walls to generate energy. To do this they must first understand how...

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2010-07-20 09:58:40

By imaging the cell walls of a zinnia leaf down to the nanometer scale, energy researchers have a better idea about how to turn plants into biofuels. In a paper appearing online in the journal Plant Physiology, a team from Lawrence Livermore led by Michael Thelen, in collaboration with researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has used four different imaging techniques to systematically drill down deep into the cells of Zinnia elegans....

2010-07-13 02:31:29

A tiny, little-understood plant pore has enormous implications for weather forecasting, climate change, agriculture, hydrology, and more. A study by scientists at the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology, with colleagues from the Research Center Jlich in Germany, has now overturned the conventional belief about how these important structures called stomata regulate water vapor loss from the leaf"“a process called transpiration. They found that radiation is the driving...

2010-07-01 16:13:06

New research by UC Davis wheat geneticist Jorge Dubcovsky and his colleagues could lead to new strategies for improving freezing tolerance in wheat, which provides more than one-fifth of the calories consumed by people around the world. The new findings, published June 22 in the Online First issue of the journal Plant Physiology, shed light on the connection between flowering and freezing tolerance in wheat. In winter wheat and barley varieties, long exposures to non-freezing cold...

2010-07-01 12:00:16

A team of researchers from Duke University and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has found a central part in the machinery that turns plants green when they sense light. In the Rube Goldberg world of cellular mechanics, this key player turns out to be a garbage truck. Light is so essential for plants that they have two different systems to take advantage of it, explains Meng Chen, an assistant professor of biology at Duke. There's the familiar system of organelles called chloroplasts...


Latest Plant physiology Reference Libraries

International Journal of Biometeorology
2012-04-29 20:58:31

The International Journal of Biometeorology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Springer Science+Business Media on behalf of the International Society of Biometeorology. The journal publishes original research papers, review articles, and short communications on studies examining the interactions between living organisms and factors of the natural and artificial physical environment. It publishes articles in the following fields: Earth and environmental science, life...

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2009-04-23 11:07:34

Bittercress (Barbarea vulgaris), also commonly known as Herb Barbara, Rocketcress, Yellow Rocketcress, Winter Rocket, and Wound Rocket, is a European biennial herb. This plant displays a rosette of shiny, dark green leaves at the base and additional pinnately divided leaves on the stem. In the spring, yellow flowers originate in tightly packed terminal groups just above the foliage. Bittercress grows wildly as a weed in many parts of North America. The flowers can be in bloom May...

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2007-12-27 09:16:35

The Par Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis), is a tree belonging to the family Euphorbiaceae. It is the most economically important member of the genus Hevea. It is of major economic importance because its sap-like extract (latex) can be collected and is the primary source of natural rubber. The Pará rubber tree initially grew only in the Amazon Rainforest. Now most rubber tree plantations are in southeast Asia and tropical Africa. Attempts to cultivate the tree in other areas in South...

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