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Latest Plant physiology Stories

2011-01-11 15:24:01

Purdue University researchers have found a genetic mutation that allows a plant to better endure drought without losing biomass, a discovery that could reduce the amount of water required for growing plants and help plants survive and thrive in adverse conditions. Plants can naturally control the opening and closing of stomata, pores that take in carbon dioxide and release water. During drought conditions, a plant might close its stomata to conserve water. By doing so, however, the plant also...

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2011-01-11 10:27:56

In the vast ocean where an essential nutrient"”iron"”is scarce, a marine bacterium that launches the ocean food web survives by using a remarkable biochemical trick: It recycles iron. By day, it uses iron in enzymes for photosynthesis to make carbohydrates; then by night, it appears to reuse the same iron in different enzymes to produce organic nitrogen for proteins. The bacterium, Crocosphaera watsonii, is one of the few marine microbes that can convert nitrogen gas into organic...

2010-12-17 17:12:57

The molecular basis of shade avoidance reaction PNAS report on a collaborative study involving RUB scientists Plants that "lose the battle" during competitiveness for light because they are shaded by larger neighbours, counteract. They adapt by rapid shoot elongation and stretch their leaves towards the sun. The molecular basis of this so-called shade avoidance syndrome had been unclarified to date. Research scientists from the Utrecht University in the Netherlands and the Ruhr University in...

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2010-12-15 08:17:39

By Diana Lutz, WUSTL The cyanobacteria are famous for releasing the oxygen that made Earth the hospitable planet we know today, but some strains also have a hidden talent for producing hydrogen gas Inside a small cabinet the size of a dorm refrigerator in one of Himadri B. Pakrasi's labs, a blue-green soup percolates in thick glass bottles under the cool light of red, blue and green LEDS. This isn't just any soup, however. It is a soup of champions. The soup is colored by a strain of...

2010-12-14 00:58:21

Plants are very sensitive to light conditions because light is their source of energy and also a signal that activates the special photoreceptors that regulate growth, metabolism, and physiological development. Scientists believe that these light signals control plant growth and development by activating or inhibiting plant hormones. New research from Carnegie plant biologists has altered the prevailing theory on how light signals and hormones interact. Their findings could have implications...

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2010-12-13 11:41:16

The researchers decided to embark on this study in order to find out which mechanisms are used by plants when they extract water from very dry or somewhat inhospitable land. "In the case of mangrove swamps, for example, the plants are able to extract freshwater from a saltwater environment, despite the fact that the osmotic pressure should make quite the opposite happen", explains Professor Jos© Luis P©rez Díaz, who studies this type of relatively unknown...

2010-12-06 21:14:18

Nonindigenous insects and pathogens, including many that cause serious damage, have established in forests in the United States with regularity over 15 decades Nonindigenous insects and pathogens continue to become established in US forests with regularity despite regulations intended to prevent this, according to a study published in the December 2010 issue of BioScience. The study, by a team led by Juliann E. Aukema of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis in Santa...

2010-12-03 07:12:25

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ Children with autism are much more likely to have deficits in their ability to produce cellular energy than typically developing children. The researchers found that cumulative damage and oxidative stress in mitochondria, the energy producer of the cell, could influence the onset and severity of autism, suggesting a strong link between autism and mitochondrial defects. The authors believe that lack of ability to fuel the brain neurons might lead to some of the...

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2010-11-17 11:52:12

By Shelley Littin, NASA Space Grant intern, University of Arizona New University of Arizona research indicates that leaf vein patterns correlate with functions such as carbon intake and water use "“ knowledge that could help scientists better understand the complex carbon cycle that is at the heart of global climate warming. "Leaves have very different networks of veins. They have different shapes, different sizes, different thicknesses," said Benjamin Blonder, a doctoral student in the...

2010-11-16 21:40:08

According to a popular hypothesis, grasses such as maize, sugar cane, millet and sorghum got their evolutionary start as a result of a steep drop in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels during the Oligocene epoch, more than 23 million years ago. A new study overturns that hypothesis, presenting the first geological evidence that the ancestors of these and other C4 grasses emerged millions of years earlier than previously established. The findings are published in the journal Geology. C4 plants...


Latest Plant physiology Reference Libraries

International Journal of Biometeorology
2012-04-29 20:58:31

The International Journal of Biometeorology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Springer Science+Business Media on behalf of the International Society of Biometeorology. The journal publishes original research papers, review articles, and short communications on studies examining the interactions between living organisms and factors of the natural and artificial physical environment. It publishes articles in the following fields: Earth and environmental science, life...

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2009-04-23 11:07:34

Bittercress (Barbarea vulgaris), also commonly known as Herb Barbara, Rocketcress, Yellow Rocketcress, Winter Rocket, and Wound Rocket, is a European biennial herb. This plant displays a rosette of shiny, dark green leaves at the base and additional pinnately divided leaves on the stem. In the spring, yellow flowers originate in tightly packed terminal groups just above the foliage. Bittercress grows wildly as a weed in many parts of North America. The flowers can be in bloom May...

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2007-12-27 09:16:35

The Par Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis), is a tree belonging to the family Euphorbiaceae. It is the most economically important member of the genus Hevea. It is of major economic importance because its sap-like extract (latex) can be collected and is the primary source of natural rubber. The Pará rubber tree initially grew only in the Amazon Rainforest. Now most rubber tree plantations are in southeast Asia and tropical Africa. Attempts to cultivate the tree in other areas in South...

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Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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