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Latest Plant physiology Stories

2012-04-16 21:37:40

Have you ever wondered why stems grow upwards and roots downwards? Why plants always seem to turn towards the light and climbing plants run up the trellis rather than down? The answer is simple: auxin! But maybe not that simple, since plant hormones — and auxin is a plant hormone — are regulated by complex combinations of various processes. Elke Barbez, Jürgen Kleine-Vehn and Jirí  Friml, connected to VIB and UGent recently identified an...

2012-04-16 12:54:52

Findings could lead to high-yield crops that gather light more efficiently and make better use of farmland Mild mannered though they seem, plants are extremely competitive, especially when it comes to getting their fair share of sunlight. Whether a forest or a farm, where plants grow a battle wages for the sun's rays. A plant's primary weapon in this fight is the ability to grow towards the light, getting just the amount it needs and shadowing its competition. Now, scientists at the...

2012-04-12 10:21:07

RUB biologists decipher the function of the metal-binding molecule nicotianamine In order to survive, plants should take up neither too many nor too few minerals from the soil. New insights into how they operate this critical balance have now been published by biologists at the Ruhr-Universität in a series of three papers in the journal The Plant Cell. The researchers discovered novel functions of the metal-binding molecule nicotianamine. "The results are important for...

2012-04-06 11:11:11

New research by UCLA life scientists could lead to predictions of which plant species will escape extinction from climate change. Droughts are worsening around the world, posing a great challenge to plants in all ecosystems, said Lawren Sack, a UCLA professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and senior author of the research. Scientists have debated for more than a century how to predict which species are most vulnerable. Sack and two members of his laboratory have made a fundamental...

2012-04-03 09:14:45

Plants breathe through stomata Plant leaves are protected from drying out by an airtight wax layer. They breathe and release water through microscopic pores called stomata. Every year 40% of atmospheric CO2 and twice the volume of water found in our atmosphere pass through these pores. This means that stomata are not only important for plant development but also for our climate! It's no surprise then that these pores appear to be strictly regulated by plants. Stomata react extremely...

It's Official: Warm Weather Causes Flowers To Bloom
2012-03-22 12:16:28

Scientists have completed research in attempts to explain what  we see in our parks and gardens every year: with the onset of warmer weather comes blooming flowers and trees. Funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), scientists from the John Innes Center have investigated the effects of warm weather and global climate changes on flowering plants and trees. Their findings on this research will be published soon in the journal Nature. The research...

2012-02-21 15:10:48

Genome analysis of “living fossil” sheds light on the evolution of plants Atmospheric oxygen really took off on our planet about 2.4 billion years ago during the Great Oxygenation Event. At this key juncture of our planet´s evolution, species had either to learn to cope with this poison that was produced by photosynthesizing cyanobacteria or they went extinct. It now seems strange to think that the gas that sustains much of modern life had such a distasteful beginning....

2012-02-16 18:14:40

The evolution of plants and animals generally has been thought to occur through the passing of genes from parent to offspring and genetic modifications that happen along the way. But evolutionary biologists from Brown University and the University of Sheffield have documented another avenue, through the passing of genes from plant to plant between species with only a distant ancestral kinship. How this happened is unclear. But the researchers show that not only did a grouping of grasses...

2012-02-06 11:12:10

Plants leaves are sealed with a gas-tight wax layer to prevent water loss. Plants breathe through microscopic pores called stomata (Greek for mouths) on the surfaces of leaves. Over 40% of the carbon dioxide, CO2, in the atmosphere passes through stomata each year, as well a water volume twice that of the whole atmosphere. As the key conduits for CO2 uptake and water evaporation, stomata are critical for both our climate and plant productivity. Thus, not surprisingly, the total number and...


Latest Plant physiology Reference Libraries

International Journal of Biometeorology
2012-04-29 20:58:31

The International Journal of Biometeorology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Springer Science+Business Media on behalf of the International Society of Biometeorology. The journal publishes original research papers, review articles, and short communications on studies examining the interactions between living organisms and factors of the natural and artificial physical environment. It publishes articles in the following fields: Earth and environmental science, life...

45_20138aaa34c0aef5a2af87b137102229
2009-04-23 11:07:34

Bittercress (Barbarea vulgaris), also commonly known as Herb Barbara, Rocketcress, Yellow Rocketcress, Winter Rocket, and Wound Rocket, is a European biennial herb. This plant displays a rosette of shiny, dark green leaves at the base and additional pinnately divided leaves on the stem. In the spring, yellow flowers originate in tightly packed terminal groups just above the foliage. Bittercress grows wildly as a weed in many parts of North America. The flowers can be in bloom May...

31_bce3ffdce7cc57383287500d7afbf24c
2007-12-27 09:16:35

The Par Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis), is a tree belonging to the family Euphorbiaceae. It is the most economically important member of the genus Hevea. It is of major economic importance because its sap-like extract (latex) can be collected and is the primary source of natural rubber. The Pará rubber tree initially grew only in the Amazon Rainforest. Now most rubber tree plantations are in southeast Asia and tropical Africa. Attempts to cultivate the tree in other areas in South...

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Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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