Quantcast

Latest Plant physiology Stories

2012-01-25 12:42:36

The upsurge in droughts is one of the main consequences of climate change, and affects crops in particular. However, Anabel Robredo, a biologist at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), has confirmed that in the case of barley at least, climate change itself is providing it with self-defence mechanisms to tackle a lack of water. Climate change is in fact also responsible for a considerable increase in the concentration of CO2, a gas that, paradoxically, is providing this plant with...

Why Do Dew Drops Do What They Do On Leaves?
2012-01-13 04:18:35

Nobel laureate poet Rabindranath Tagore once wrote, "Let your life lightly dance on the edges of time like dew on the tip of a leaf." Now, a new study is finally offering an explanation for why small dew drops do as Tagore advised and form on the tips, rather than the flat surfaces, of leaves. It appears in ACS' journal Langmuir. In the study, Martin E. R. Shanahan observes that drops of water have a preference for exactly where they collect on leaves as their surfaces cool in the morning...

2011-12-20 22:43:43

Plant roots are fascinating plant organs — they not only anchor the plant, but are also the world's most efficient mining companies. Roots live in darkness and direct the activities of the other organs, as well as interact with the surrounding environment. Charles Darwin posited in The Power of Movement of Plants that the root system acts as a plant's brain. Due to the difficulty of accessing root tissue in intact live plants, research of these hidden parts has always lagged behind...

2011-12-19 16:16:05

A 125-year debate on how nitrogen-fixing bacteria are able to breach the cell walls of legumes has been settled A 125-year debate on how nitrogen-fixing bacteria are able to breach the cell walls of legumes has been settled. A paper to be published on Monday by John Innes Centre scientists reports that plants themselves allow bacteria in. Once inside the right cells, these bacteria take nitrogen from the air and supply it to legumes in a form they can use, ammonia. Whether the bacteria...

2011-12-13 22:27:03

Researchers discover the protein that transports sucrose to the plant´s vascular pathways Plants must supply their various tissues with the carbohydrates they produce through photosynthesis in the leaves. However, they do not have a muscular pump like the human heart to help transport this vital fuel. Instead, they use pump proteins in their cell membranes for this purpose. Together with colleagues from the Carnegie Institution for Science in California, Alisdair Fernie from the Max...

2011-12-12 21:57:59

Treated seedlings are healthier, more vigorous after transplanting The quality of agricultural seedlings is important to crop growth and yield after transplantation. Good quality seedlings exhibit characteristics such as thick stems, thick leaves, dark green leaves, and large white roots. Scientists have long known that plant development and physiology are strongly influenced by the light spectrum, which affects seedling structure. Raising seedlings irradiated with blue light has been...

2011-12-09 11:52:42

Food prices are soaring at the same time as the Earth's population is nearing 9 billion. As a result the need for increased crop yields is extremely important. New research led by Carnegie's Wolf Frommer into the system by which sugars are moved throughout a plant -- from the leaves to the harvested portions and elsewhere -- could be crucial for addressing this problem. Their work is published Dec. 8 by Science Express. Just as it's necessary for the human body to move nutrients to all of...

2011-12-09 11:43:55

Discovery could lead to improved disease resistance in food crops Researchers at the University of Missouri have found a key process in a plant's immune system response that may help future crops fight off dangerous diseases. "We study how Arabidopsis, a common weed related to the mustard plant, fends off infectious agents," said Walter Gassmann, professor of plant sciences and researcher for the Christopher S. Bond Life Sciences Center and Interdisciplinary Plant Group. "We have...

Image 1 - How Drought-tolerant Grasses Came To Be
2011-11-25 04:28:54

New grass family tree reveals C4 photosynthesis is an evolutionary 1-way street If you eat bread stuffing or grain-fed turkey this Thanksgiving, give thanks to the grasses – a family of plants that includes wheat, oats, corn and rice. Some grasses, such as corn and sugar cane, have evolved a unique way of harvesting energy from the sun that's more efficient in hot, arid conditions. A new grass family tree reveals how this mode of photosynthesis came to be. The results may one day...


Latest Plant physiology Reference Libraries

International Journal of Biometeorology
2012-04-29 20:58:31

The International Journal of Biometeorology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Springer Science+Business Media on behalf of the International Society of Biometeorology. The journal publishes original research papers, review articles, and short communications on studies examining the interactions between living organisms and factors of the natural and artificial physical environment. It publishes articles in the following fields: Earth and environmental science, life...

45_20138aaa34c0aef5a2af87b137102229
2009-04-23 11:07:34

Bittercress (Barbarea vulgaris), also commonly known as Herb Barbara, Rocketcress, Yellow Rocketcress, Winter Rocket, and Wound Rocket, is a European biennial herb. This plant displays a rosette of shiny, dark green leaves at the base and additional pinnately divided leaves on the stem. In the spring, yellow flowers originate in tightly packed terminal groups just above the foliage. Bittercress grows wildly as a weed in many parts of North America. The flowers can be in bloom May...

31_bce3ffdce7cc57383287500d7afbf24c
2007-12-27 09:16:35

The Par Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis), is a tree belonging to the family Euphorbiaceae. It is the most economically important member of the genus Hevea. It is of major economic importance because its sap-like extract (latex) can be collected and is the primary source of natural rubber. The Pará rubber tree initially grew only in the Amazon Rainforest. Now most rubber tree plantations are in southeast Asia and tropical Africa. Attempts to cultivate the tree in other areas in South...

More Articles (3 articles) »
Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
Related