Quantcast

Latest Plant sexuality Stories

2010-09-16 17:29:43

Patterns of flower biodiversity point to the importance of having 'room to grow' What, in nature, drives the incredible diversity of flowers? This question has sparked debate since Darwin described flower diversification as an 'abominable mystery.' The answer has become a lot clearer, according to scientists at the University of Calgary whose research on the subject is published today in the on-line edition of the journal Ecology Letters. Drs. Jana Vamosi and Steven Vamosi of the Department...

2010-06-22 16:00:00

QIQIHAR, China, June 22 /PRNewswire-Asia-FirstCall/ -- Forex365, Inc. ("Forex365" or "the Company") (OTC Bulletin Board: FRXTD) today announced that it has completed a share exchange transaction with China Golden Holdings, Ltd. ("China Golden"), a leading regional provider of field seeds and fertilizers in Northeastern China, and closed a $2.5 million private placement financing on June 17th, 2010. The newly public company is quoted on the Over the Counter Bulletin Board under the symbol...

521514de9758aabdb77b139104c862411
2010-06-16 14:26:24

The world is a cooler, wetter place because of flowering plants, according to new climate simulation results published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The effect is especially pronounced in the Amazon basin, where replacing flowering plants with non"“flowering varieties would result in an 80 percent decrease in the area covered by ever"“wet rainforest. The simulations demonstrate the importance of flowering"“plant physiology to climate regulation in...

2010-04-14 14:14:00

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz., April 14 /PRNewswire/ -- Humble Seed cultivates the gardener within all of us with irresistible "seed that feeds" kits. Each kit features premium seed packets for an array of edible plants. First-time entrepreneurs Jim and Kristen Mitchell, who launched the online business today, aim to inspire would-be growers by making seed selection easier while enhancing variety, flavor, and nutritional value. (Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20100414/CL86660) Instead of...

83a065e7122a579ee18b6de2b7d9a2d91
2010-03-23 09:30:05

New research confirms that early angiosperms were weedy, fast-growing Fossils and their surrounding matrix can provide insights into what our world looked like millions of years ago. Fossils of angiosperms, or flowering plants (which are the most common plants today), first appear in the fossil record about 140 million years ago. Based on the material in which these fossils are deposited, it is thought that early angiosperms must have been weedy, fast-growing shrubs and herbs found in highly...

2723037dcfed5a994d36bdbea7701f4c1
2010-03-15 15:40:20

Findings fuel ongoing debates over different approaches to dating the tree of life Flowering plants may be considerably older than previously thought, says a new analysis of the plant family tree. Previous studies suggest that flowering plants, or angiosperms, first arose 140 to 190 million years ago. Now, a paper to be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences pushes back the age of angiosperms to 215 million years ago, some 25 to 75 million years earlier than either...

e8d198299e0bd36ee038024f28098dd0
2010-03-01 07:31:24

Power struggle between genetic master switches decides stem cell fate, growth orientation in plants The first order of business for any fledgling plant embryo is to determine which end grows the shoot and which end puts down roots. Now, researchers at the Salk Institute expose the turf wars between two groups of antagonistic genetic master switches that set up a plant's polar axis with a root on one end and a shoot on the other. "In what is arguably the most important decision for a plant,...

2010-02-18 14:07:21

College of Biological Sciences researcher Helene Muller-Landau has developed a new theory explaining why some plant species produce a small number of large seeds while others produce a large number of small seeds. Using mathematical modeling, Muller-Landau demonstrated that plants having different size seeds can coexist when regeneration sites vary in stressfulness.  Species that produce large seeds (e.g., coconuts) have the advantage under stressful conditions -- such as drought or...

0a5eb0134b10b6ad75560fea088252791
2010-02-16 11:51:20

Plants and people alike face critical choices as they reproduce: to make a few big, well-provisioned seeds"”or babies--or many small, poorly-provisioned ones. Different species make strikingly different choices, resulting in a great diversity of life forms: Darwin's "endless forms most beautiful. Helene Muller-Landau, staff scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute argues that these diverse strategies coexist because different levels of stress favor different choices. "I...

2010-02-01 17:48:04

Scientists from Kew's Millennium Seed Bank in the United Kingdom and the University of Graz, Austria, have developed a rapid, new method to diagnose seed quality non-invasively and in real time. The results are published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and have great significance for conservation ecology and agriculture. www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.0914197107 By using infrared temperature measurement, seed viability results are achieved in less than two...


Latest Plant sexuality Reference Libraries

30_1f12cae0cfa114ac8945564df871c6d8
2005-06-08 20:47:33

Iris is a genus of flowering plants with showy flowers ranging in color from gold, copper-red or yellow to white, blue, blue-violet, lavender, tan, maroon and purple. Pink and apricot colored irises have also been bred in some species. The name "Iris" can be applied to the genus or to any of the species within it. It is also applied to various subdivisions within the genus. Description There are many species of iris widely distributed throughout the northern temperate zone. Their...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.