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Latest Plant taxonomy Stories

2011-09-14 22:23:07

Important changes that will affect the publication of new names in algae, fungi, and plants accepted by the XVIII International Botanical Congress are detailed in a paper that is being published simultaneously or will be published soon in a total of sixteen leading academic journals. The paper, co-authored by Sandra Knapp (London), John McNeill (Edinburgh) and Nicholas Turland (St. Louis), presents the draft text of new articles to the Code and some ideas for best practice for authors and...

2011-09-14 13:15:07

Botanical taxonomy, which extends to include the formal scientific naming of all plants, algae and fungi has gone through a landmark change in the procedure scientists need to follow when they describe new species. Details of the forthcoming changes to the newly-named 'International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants' are laid out by Dr Sandra Knapp and colleagues in an article published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology. It has been suggested that...

2011-07-28 01:06:53

The Nomenclature Section of the 18th International Botanical Congress in Melbourne, in July 2011, proposed and approved sweeping changes to the way scientists name new plants, algae, and fungi. To demonstrate the efficiency of electronic publishing, the first open access plant taxonomy journal PhytoKeys published a correspondence note by a team of botanists from various USA institutions (Smithsonian Institution, The Missouri Botanical Garden, The Chicago Botanical Garden, and The Field Museum...

2011-07-22 04:00:00

SANTA BARBARA, Calif., July 22, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Choosing the right plant for your garden can be a daunting task, but with this new online comparison tool you can sift through 48,000 plants from the USDA plants database and narrow down your choices, complete with charts and images. You can filter by growth period, soil texture, lifespan, shade tolerance, toxicity, and more. This tool is simple enough for the average gardener to use but has enough advanced options to be useful to even...

2011-07-06 15:25:00

TORONTO, July 6, 2011 /PRNewswire/ - Pacific Rubiales Energy Corp. (TSX: PRE; BVC: PREC) is pleased to announce that today Standard & Poor's Ratings Services raised its corporate credit rating on Pacific Rubiales to BB from BB-. At the same time, it raised the rating on Pacific Rubiales' $450 million senior unsecured notes due 2016 to BB. Standard and Poor's reported that the stable outlook reflects their view that Pacific Rubiales will continue to generate strong financial...

2011-04-18 13:56:57

It was previously thought that land plants evolved from stonewort-like algae. However, new research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology shows that the closest relatives to land plants are actually conjugating green algae such as Spirogyra. Ancestors of green plants began to colonise the land about 500 million years ago and it is generally accepted that they evolved from streptophyte algae (a group of green, fresh water algae). But this group of algae is...

2011-03-29 13:34:35

An international research team led by Brown University has amassed the largest evolutionary tree (phylogeny) for plants. It has learned that major groups of plants tinker with their design and performance before rapidly spinning off new species. The finding upends long-held thinking that plants' speciation rates are tied to the first development of a new physical trait or mechanism. Results are published in the American Journal of Botany. Just as a company creates new, better versions of a...

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2010-12-07 09:35:00

There are more than 70,000 new flowering plant species yet to be discovered, and more than half of them may have already been collected but not yet identified, according to a new study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). "Despite the importance of species discovery, the processes including collecting, recognizing, and describing new species are poorly understood," lead author Dr. Robert Scotland of Oxford University's Department of Plant Sciences...

2010-10-22 01:49:37

Most flowering plants, equipped with both male and female sex organs, can fertilize themselves and procreate without the aid of a mate. But this may only present a short-term adaptive benefit, according to a team of researchers led by two University of Illinois at Chicago biologists, who report that long-term evolutionary survival of a species favors flowers that welcome pollen from another plant. "We've shown that a strong, short-term advantage experienced by individuals that have sex with...


Latest Plant taxonomy Reference Libraries

Adenanthos sericeus
2014-10-15 11:12:56

Adenanthos sericeus is a shrub species, the plant may also be referred to as the Woolly bush. A. sericeus is a member of the Proteaceae family. This species can be found naturally on the south coast of Western Australia. Adenanthos sericeus is an erect, low growing shrub; however, the plant has been known to act as a small tree growing up to 16 feet tall. Its leaves typically grow to 1.6 inches long and are lobed in 3 sections of narrow laciniae. Mature branches shed a layer of short...

Adenanthos obovatus
2014-10-14 12:02:16

Adenanthos obovatus is a shrub species. The species may also be referred to as the Basket flower, the Jugflower, Glandflower, and the Stick-in-the-jug. The plant belongs to the Proteaceae family. A. obovatus can be found only in Southwest Australia. Adenanthos obovatus have many stems. The plant will grow to approximately 3 feet in height and 4.9 feet in diameter. The plant’s long, oval leaves are typically a bright green color. The A. obovatus shrub blooms between April and December....

Adenanthos macropodianus
2014-10-14 11:59:16

Adenanthos macropodianus is a shrub species. The plant may also be referred to as the Gland Flower or the Kangaroo Island gland flower. A. macropodianus belongs to the Proteaceae family. This species can be found only on Kangaroo Island in South Australia. Adenanthos macropodianus was listed as a variety of A. sericeus for over 100 years until finally in 1970 the plant was given its own species classification. Adenanthos macropodianus grows upright reaching approximately 3 feet in height....

Adenanthos detmoldii
2014-10-14 11:54:32

Adenanthos detmoldii is a shrub species. The species may also be referred to as the Scott River jugflower or the Yellow jugflower. This plant belongs to the Proteaceae family. The shrub can be found in Western Australia. Adenanthos detmoldii is an upright growing shrub. It reaches heights of 13 feet tall. The shrub produces leaves that measure 80 millimeters in length and 5 millimeters wide. The leaves are long, narrow and its branches are covered in a fine hair like substance. Between...

Adenanthos cuneatus
2014-10-14 11:50:36

Adenanthos cuneatus is a shrub species. The species is also known as the Coastal jugflower, Flame bush, Bridle bush and Sweat bush. The plant belongs to the Proteaceae family and can be found on the south coast of Western Australia. The species grows most abundant between King George Sound and Israelite Bay. Its heathland environment offers siliceous sandplain soil with good drainage and this provides a suitable habitat for the shrub to flourish. A. cuneatus is an upright standing shrub....

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Word of the Day
conjunto
  • A style of popular dance music originating along the border between Texas and Mexico, characterized by the use of accordion, drums, and 12-string bass guitar and traditionally based on polka, waltz, and bolero rhythms.
The word 'conjunto' comes through Spanish, from Latin coniūnctus, past participle of coniungere, to join together; see conjoin