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Latest Plant taxonomy Stories

2009-09-03 09:51:20

Flowering plants are all around us and are phenomenally successful—but how did they get to be so successful and where did they come from? This question bothered Darwin and others and a paper published in the September issue of the Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society indicates that their ability to adapt anatomically may be the answer.

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2009-08-21 09:55:00

The ability to envisage the future may be closer than you would think. A recent paper by Sean Hammond and Karl Niklas in the August 2009 issue of the American Journal of Botany (available here) presents an algorithm that may be used to predict the future dynamics of plant communities

2009-07-14 11:30:00

New findings from Queen's University biologists show that in the plant world, bigger isn't necessarily better.

2009-07-13 11:06:15

The appearance of many species of flowering plants on Earth, and especially their relatively rapid dissemination during the Cretaceous (approximately 100 million years ago) can be attributed to their capacity to transform the world to their own needs.

2009-07-02 12:18:18

As flowering plants like giant trees quickly rose to dominate plant communities during the Cretaceous period, the ferns that had preceded them hardly saw it as a disappointment.

2009-03-10 08:15:39

As the first plant life to emerge from the water and develop on dry earth, bryophytes offer a unique opportunity for researchers to understand the development of protections against ultraviolet radiation.

2009-02-11 10:20:35

A U.S. study suggests a burst of flowering plants 90 million years ago led to the formation of forests and similar evolutionary bursts in animals. The University of Florida-led study was based on a DNA analysis of living flowering plants.

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2009-02-10 11:30:29

A new University of Florida study based on DNA analysis from living flowering plants shows that the ancestors of most modern trees diversified extremely rapidly 90 million years ago, ultimately leading to the formation of forests that supported similar evolutionary bursts in animals and other plants.

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2009-01-27 11:57:05

Land plants' ability to sprout upward through the air, unsupported except by their own woody tissues, has long been considered one of the characteristics separating them from aquatic plants, which rely on water to support them.

2008-10-21 15:00:11

The 149-year-old Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis, one of the world's largest botanical collections, has received its 6 millionth herbarium specimen. A herbarium is essentially a "library" of plant specimens.


Latest Plant taxonomy Reference Libraries

Corydalis nobilis
2014-10-29 10:55:24

Corydalis nobilis, also known as Siberian corydalis, is a perennial plant from the family Papaveraceae. It was introduced to Europe by Linnaeus, who had sent for Lamprocapnos spectabilis but received the seeds of C. nobilis instead. C. nobilis bears its flower on a stem that may grow as tall as 50 centimeters. The stem of the plant is grows upright with pinnate leaves along the entire stem. C. nobilis has flowers of orange or yellow. The inner petals of the flower have a dark violet hue at...

Papaver glaucum
2014-10-27 10:40:36

Papaver glaucum, otherwise known as the Turkish tulip or Turkish red poppy, is a poppy plant that grows in the region of Anatolia. It is from the family Papaveraceae. P. glaucum can grow to a height of 35 inches. This poppy can withstand the most difficult climates, including the droughts of the dry Middle East. The flowers of the poppy are a vibrant rich red, with notable black spots in the center. The petals are thin, and may appear and feel crispy or brittle. When blooming, the flowers...

Lamprocapnos spectabilis
2014-10-27 10:12:32

Lamprocaponos spectabilis is a flowering plant. The species belongs to the Papaveraceae family. The plant is native to Asia; Siberia, northern China, Korea and Japan. L. spectabilis stands alone in its monotypic genus, meaning it has no subspecies or smaller subordinates. The plant may now be listed as Dicentra spectabilis and is commonly referred to as Bleeding heart, Dutchman’s breeches or “lady-in-a-bath”. L. spectabilis is used widely in gardens and landscapes. The plant is a...

Hunnemannia
2014-10-27 10:09:27

Hunnemannia is a genus of flowering plant. The genus is monotypic, meaning it is a group containing only one immediately subordinate species. This flowering plant belongs to the Papaveraceae family. The only single species is H. fumarifolia, commonly known as tulip poppy or Mexican tulip poppy. Hunnemannia is found in the Chihuahuan Desert and central Mexico. The genus is found in the highlands at elevations of 4,921-6,562 feet. The species prefers rocky habitats. Hunnemannia is a...

Eomecon
2014-10-27 10:06:01

Eomecon is a genus of flowering plant. This genus belongs to the Papaveraceae family. Eomecon is a monotypic taxon meaning the genus only contains one subordinate taxon. The sole species making up the genus is Eomecon chionantha, commonly known as the Snow-poppy or the Dawn poppy. The species is endemic to China. Eomecon is a perennial plant meaning it can survive longer than 2 years. The plant will typically have leaves reaching up to 30 centimeters long. Its leaves are heart or kidney...

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Word of the Day
swell-mobsman
  • A member of the swell-mob; a genteelly clad pickpocket. Sometimes mobsman.
Use of the word 'swell-mobsman' dates at least to the early 1800s.