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Latest Plant Stories

2014-05-21 10:14:43

UC Davis Can plants and animals evolve to keep pace with climate change? A study published May 19 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that for at least one widely-studied plant, the European climate is changing fast enough that strains from Southern Europe already grow better in the north than established local varieties. Small and fast-growing, Arabidopsis thaliana is widely used as the “lab mouse” of plant biology. The plant grows in Europe from...

2014-05-21 08:23:52

Adding a living wall to indoor spaces is now a breeze with the framed wall planter from Suite Plants. The company has revolutionized the plant wall concept with a product that is simple to install and only requires water once per month. CORNWALL-ON-HUDSON, N.Y., May 21, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Family-owned and operated business Suite Plants has designed a number of innovative living wall products that add a touch of green to business and commercial spaces. These wall planter products...

2014-05-15 16:30:19

The World's FIRST portable & modular plant shade device for backyard gardeners MONTCLAIR, N.J., May 15, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- I'm Mark Khan, the inventor of the PlantBrolly, a recently launched Kickstarter project https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/724357767/protecting-your-plants-from-too-much-sun Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140515/87973 The PlantBrolly came about because I needed to shade my ornamental plants from a sun that seems to be getting hotter every year....

Leaf Chewing Links Insect Diversity In Tropical Forests
2014-05-05 03:53:42

By A'ndrea Elyse Messer, Penn State Observations of insects and their feeding marks on leaves in modern forests confirm indications from fossil leaf deposits that the diversity of chewing damage relates directly to diversity of the insect population that created it, according to an international team of researchers. "The direct link between richness of leaf-chewing insects and their feeding damage across host plants in two tropical forests validates the underlying assumptions of many...

Aquatic Algae Can See A Wide Spectrum Of Light
2014-05-02 03:00:50

[ Watch The Video: Algae “See” A Wide Spectrum Of Light ] Andy Fell, UC Davis Aquatic algae can sense an unexpectedly wide range of color, allowing them to sense and adapt to changing light conditions in lakes and oceans. The study by researchers at UC Davis was published earlier this year in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Phytochromes are the eyes of a plant, allowing it to detect changes in the color, intensity, and quality of light so that the...

fern
2014-04-15 03:00:24

Erin Weeks, Duke University Bumping sex cells with the hornworts may have done it During the age of the dinosaurs, the arrival of flowering plants as competitors could have spelled doom for the ancient fern lineage. Instead, ferns diversified and flourished under the new canopy -- using a mysterious gene that helped them adapt to low-light environments. A team led by Duke University scientists has pinpointed the curious origins of this gene and determined that it was transferred to...

2014-04-04 11:00:50

For Simon Gilroy, sometimes seeing is believing. In this case, it was seeing the wave of calcium sweep root-to-shoot in the plants the University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of botany is studying that made him a believer. Gilroy and colleagues, in a March 24, 2014 paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, showed what long had been suspected but long had eluded scientists: that calcium is involved in rapid plant cell communication. It's a finding that has...

Photosynthesis Measurements From Space
2014-03-25 10:22:18

Carnegie Institution Plants convert energy from sunlight into chemical energy during a process called photosynthesis. This energy is passed on to humans and animals that eat the plants, and thus photosynthesis is the primary source of energy for all life on Earth. But the photosynthetic activity of various regions is changing due to human interaction with the environment, including climate change, which makes large-scale studies of photosynthetic activity of interest. New research from a...

fern fossil
2014-03-24 07:26:02

Lund University Researchers from Lund University and the Swedish Museum of Natural History have made a unique discovery in a well-preserved fern that lived 180 million years ago. Both undestroyed cell nuclei and individual chromosomes have been found in the plant fossil, thanks to its sudden burial in a volcanic eruption. The well-preserved fossil of a fern from the southern Swedish county of Skåne is now attracting attention in the research community. The plant lived around 180...

Grazing Animals May Protect Biodiversity In Over-Fertilized Grasslands
2014-03-11 09:34:12

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Nutrient Network has released a new, comparative study of grasslands on six continents, to be published in an upcoming issue of Nature, that suggests it might be possible to counteract the human-made overdose of fertilizer that threatens to permanently alter the biodiversity of the world's native prairies. The key finding of this study, carried out at 40 sites globally, is simple: let grazing animals crop the excess growth of...


Latest Plant Reference Libraries

Dawsonia
2013-11-04 10:01:23

Dawsonia is a classification of mosses. This genus is a member of the Polytrichaceae family. Dawsonia plants are commonly known to grow taller and have thicker leaves than other common mosses. Mosses are known to grow when hydrated, however most common mosses lack cuticles and internal transport tissues. This makes it difficult for them to maintain substantial amounts of water and they typically do not grow tall. Dawsonia are an exception to this common rule. Dawsonia mosses are...

Petrified Forest National Park
2013-04-24 16:53:26

Petrified Forest National Park is located in the state of Arizona in the United States. The park holds 221,552 acres of land, of which 50,260 acres are comprised of a designated wilderness. The area was once inhabited by Native American tribes including the basket maker and pueblo peoples. The first American explorers to enter the area arrived while searching for good routes leading from east to west. This group, led by Army Lieutenant Amiel Whipple, surveyed the northern area of the...

45_0d6f53866162cdab6d2a37a3a3101ea9
2008-06-15 19:31:02

The Whisk Fern (Psilotum nudum), is a genus of fern-like vascular plants, one of two genera in the family Psilotaceae, order Psilotales, and class Psilotopsida (the other being Tmesipteris). The distribution of Psilotum is tropical and subtropical, in the New World, Asia, and the Pacific. The highest latitudes known are in South Carolina and southern Japan for P. nudum. In the U.S., one species is found from Florida to Texas, the other in Hawaii. They had traditionally been thought not to...

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Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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