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Sloths Life In The Evolutionary Fast Lane

Sloths: Life In The Evolutionary Fast Lane

Bex Caygill, University College London Today’s sloths might be known as slow, small animals, but their ancestors developed large body sizes at an amazing rate, according to an evolutionary reconstruction published September 10 in BMC...

Latest Pleistocene extinctions Stories

Homo floresiensis
2014-08-05 06:24:34

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Skeletal remains recovered from the Indonesian island of Flores over a decade ago are not a new species of “hobbit” sized human, but an ancient Homo sapien showing signs of abnormal development consistent with Down syndrome, an international team of researchers claim in a new Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences study. According to NBC News, the 15,000-year-old fossil identified as LB1 had previously been determined...

mammoth
2014-07-24 04:48:42

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Around the end of the last ice age roughly 10,000 years ago, mammoths and mastodons lived in North America. According to the Field Museum of Natural History, the 14-foot tall mammoths migrated to North America from Europe across the Bering Land Bridge. The smaller, heavier mastodons, however, were indigenous to the continent. Both of these fuzzy relatives to modern-day elephants once lived in the Greater Cincinnati area during this...

Early Humans May Have Preyed On Elephant Ancestor Gomphothere
2014-07-15 12:58:30

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Gomphotheres, genetic relatives of the elephant, were thought to have roamed North America and became extinct long before humans reached the continent. But, according to a new study, researchers have uncovered evidence that North America’s earliest humans may have preyed on the ancient mammals. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, study researchers from the United States and Mexico found remains of...

Long-Term Climate Factors Led Early Humans To Patchwork Evolution
2014-07-04 11:14:48

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In the past, scientists concluded many of man’s defining qualities, such as legs made for walking upright and a large brain, evolved all at once. But according to a new study in the journal Science, shifts in climate caused these qualities to evolve separately. Based on analyses of fossil evidence, the study researchers said the shrinking of forests and expansion of savannas in East Africa led to walking upright, which freed our...

“Mosaic Pattern” Of Cranial Evolution Supported By Study Of Neanderthal Skulls In Spain
2014-06-20 08:27:46

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online Analysis of several skulls found in a Spanish cave reveal that the trademark facial features of the Neanderthals appeared prior to their braincases, lending new support to the “mosaic pattern” theory that the long extinct human predecessors did not evolve their defining characteristics all at the same time. The study, which appears in the journal Science, uses new data obtained from 17 fossilized human skulls obtained from...

High Tibet May Have Been Starting Point For Cold-Adapted Mammals
2014-06-11 10:14:47

Gerard LeBlond for redorbit.com - Your Universe Online Over the past 2.5 million years, the Earth has gone through changes in climate. Warm and cold cycles, some lasting for millennia, have become known as the Ice Age. During the cold cycles, ice sheets covered large areas of the northern hemisphere and as the ice melted during the warm cycles, the glaciers receded leaving huge valleys behind. These cycles also affected the evolution and distribution of animals, including the ones living...

Humans, Not Climate Change, Led To Extinction Of Mammal Giants
2014-06-05 11:08:22

Alan McStravick for redorbit.com - Your Universe online We could be living in a world populated with giant deer, wombats, sabre-toothed cats, marsupial lions and kangaroos but for one important factor: humans killed them all. A new study out of Aarhus University, Denmark's second oldest university, looked back over the past 100,000 years and determined that human expansion and competition, not climate change, marched these and many other large mammals right out of the Animal Kingdom. This...

fossil dog with mammoth bone in mouth
2014-05-30 09:14:16

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have long-suspected that our ancestors were at least partially to blame for the extinction of the mammoth and a new research review from a Penn State anthropologist has revealed that ancient humans may have had an accomplice – domesticated dogs. The new study, published in the journal Quaternary International, is based on past examinations of European archeological sites with large numbers of mammoth remains. Study author...

Young Boy Accidentally Finds Fossilized Tooth Of Ancient Mastodon
2014-04-22 11:23:43

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Mothers often tell their kids not to pick up any strange objects, but one young boy from Michigan is probably glad he doesn’t follow that advice. Phillip Stoll, a 9-year-old boy from Windsor Township, Michigan, was playing in a creek behind his house last summer when he literally stumbled upon a fossilized mastodon tooth. "I was walking down at the creek last summer. I felt something that I stepped on so I picked it up and...

La Brea fossils
2014-04-11 04:43:36

[ Watch the Video: Research Shows Climate Change Drove Evolution Of Ice Age Predators ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online For the first time, the authors of two new scientific papers have documented the impact that global climate change had on the evolution of Ice Age-era predators whose remains were discovered in California’s La Brea Tar Pits. The authors of the two studies explain that climate warming helped drive the evolution of creatures such as dire...


Latest Pleistocene extinctions Reference Libraries

Australopithecus garhi
2013-11-29 11:38:51

Australopithecus garhi is a gracile australopithecine species whose fossils were discovered in 1996 by a research team led by Ethiopian paleontologist Berhane Asfaw ad Tim White, an American paleontologist. The remains are believed to be a human ancestor species and most likely the direct ancestor to the human genus Homo. Tim White was the scientist to find the first of the key A. garhi fossils in 1996 within the Bouri Formation found in the Middle Awash of Ethiopia’s Afar Depression....

Homo floresiensis
2013-09-16 13:06:40

Homo floresiensis Homo floresiensis, or Flores Man, nicknamed “hobbit” and “Flow”, is an extinct species in the genus Homo. The remains of an individual that would have stood about 3 feet in height were uncovered in 2003 on the island of Flores in Indonesia. Incomplete skeletons of nine individuals have been recovered, including one complete cranium. These remains have been the focus of intense research to establish whether they represent a species distinctive from modern humans....

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Stag-Moose, Cervalces scotti
2012-05-11 12:12:45

The stag-moose (Cervalces scotti) is also known as the stag moose and was actually a deer that resembled a moose. It resided in North America during the Pleistocene era. Its range included New Jersey and Iowa, reach north from Arkansas to Southern Canada. It inhabited wetlands in these areas. This animal had long legs, a head resembling an elk, and huge, complex antlers. The stag-moose became extinct during the mass extinction of large mammals that occurred in the last Ice Age on North...

Shrub-ox, Euceratherium collinum
2012-05-10 05:18:10

The shrub-ox (Euceratherium collinum) is a close relative of the modern musk-ox, and is an extinct member of the family Bovidae. It inhabited North America during the late Pleistocene, appearing before the first bovids entered North America from Eurasia. These muskoxen became extinct approximately 11,500 years ago. The shrub-ox was very large, approximately in between the sizes of a musk-ox and an American Bison. Research done on pellets left by these oxen shows that they browsed for food...

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Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'