Quantcast
Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Latest Pleistocene extinctions Stories

2008-07-10 21:00:20

LOS ANGELES, July 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The screening of National Lampoon's "Homo Erectus" was so raucous last night, it looked like a scene cut straight from the film. The July 9th event was hosted by Ain't It Cool News, and shortly after filling the Hollywood Egyptian Theatre to capacity, threats of shutting down the screener rang from the upper echelons of management. Hollywood celebrities and attendees alike duked it out for the remaining seats. Luckily, amidst the caveman-like rioting,...

74cd6e526575564ea39df292781b499f
2008-07-09 18:05:04

The Milwaukee Public Museum unveiled a woolly mammoth skeleton presumed to be some 14,500 years old, giving locals a chance to view one of the most intact specimens ever discovered in North America. The Hebior mammoth is missing only a rib and a few bones, but is otherwise nearly whole, making it one of the few specimens to be uncovered so intact. The woolly mammoth is more than twice the height of a person and it is among only three discovered with scientific significance for southern...

2008-07-01 12:00:18

By Jean Guerrero SELAH -- Short of a time machine, your best chance to see a Columbian mammoth is on a hillside overlooking the Wenas Valley where anthropology students are excavating one that died an estimated 16,000 years ago. Since the bones were discovered about three years ago, Central Washington University students and professors have uncovered ribs, a shoulder blade, vertebrae and several arm and leg bones of the creature that probably stood about 12 feet tall at the shoulder....

2008-06-29 06:02:19

By Price, Gilbert Analysis of thousands of Diprotodon fossils has resolved the debate about how many species of this ancient giant wombat existed - and uncovered some clues to their behaviour. Imagine you could travel back in time to a period not more than 100,000 years ago. What sort of world would you have seen? What was the landscape like ? What sort of animals would you likely encounter? This was a harsh period in the Earth's history, subjected to massive shifts in climate and...

2008-06-28 12:01:21

By Jean Guerrero, Yakima Herald-Republic, Wash. Jun. 28--SELAH -- Short of a time machine, your best chance to see a Columbian mammoth is on a hillside overlooking the Wenas Valley where anthropology students are excavating one that died an estimated 16,000 years ago. Since the bones were discovered about three years ago, Central Washington University students and professors have uncovered ribs, a shoulder blade, vertebrae and several arm and leg bones of the creature that probably stood...

2008-06-10 17:09:35

Two genetically distinct groups of woolly mammoths once roamed northern Siberia, a new study suggests, with one group dying out long before humans showed up. The finding suggests humans were not the only reason for the beasts' demise, as some have suggested. Scientists had long thought that woolly mammoths were one large homogeneous group, but an international group of scientists studied the mitochondrial DNA - the DNA in the genes of the mitochondria structures within cells - to paint a...

2008-04-30 16:39:41

An early human with a big mouth made for chomping strangely preferred to eat soft, squishy fruits, new dental analyses suggest. The finding - the big guy's teeth showed only light wear - might force scientists to downgrade everything they thought they knew about hominids' diets. For starters, the findings could cause this hominid, Paranthropus boisei, to relinquish rights to its long-held moniker, the Nutcracker Man, in the eyes of anthropologists. The Nutcracker Man lived from...

7d8299e1b3c92454f6e6751faf37c6541
2008-04-30 11:00:00

Human ancestor's teeth yields new cluesTiny marks on the teeth of an ancient human ancestor known as the "Nutcracker Man" may upset current evolutionary understanding of early hominid diet.Using high-powered microscopes, researchers looked at rough geometric shapes on the teeth of several Nutcracker Man specimens and determined that their structure alone was not enough to predict diet.Peter Ungar, professor of anthropology at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, contends the finding...

2008-04-16 03:00:00

By Groves, Colin The ancestors of the miniature hominins found on the Indonesian island of Flores may have spread out of Africa even before the ancestors of modern humans. The fossil record of human evolution is extremely well-known, comparable to only a few other large mammals, such as elephants. Fifty years ago, specialists were speaking of a single main line of human evolution, progressing from Australopithecus africanus (small brain, short legs, prominent jaws) through Homo erectus to...

21ca4fc39c43d4d51536e5dc5291a8941
2008-04-10 01:30:00

The remains of an ancient mammoth discovered in the Russian Arctic are providing scientists with an unprecedented view of the inner structure of the prehistoric animal.Named "Lyuba" after the wife of the hunter who discovered her in May 2007, the female mammoth presumably died almost 40,000 years ago at no more than six months in age. Upon its discovery, the calf was well preserved with its eyes and trunk in tact and some fur still remained on its body. The calf's remains were sent to Jikei...


Latest Pleistocene extinctions Reference Libraries

Australopithecus garhi
2013-11-29 11:38:51

Australopithecus garhi is a gracile australopithecine species whose fossils were discovered in 1996 by a research team led by Ethiopian paleontologist Berhane Asfaw ad Tim White, an American paleontologist. The remains are believed to be a human ancestor species and most likely the direct ancestor to the human genus Homo. Tim White was the scientist to find the first of the key A. garhi fossils in 1996 within the Bouri Formation found in the Middle Awash of Ethiopia’s Afar Depression....

Homo floresiensis
2013-09-16 13:06:40

Homo floresiensis Homo floresiensis, or Flores Man, nicknamed “hobbit” and “Flow”, is an extinct species in the genus Homo. The remains of an individual that would have stood about 3 feet in height were uncovered in 2003 on the island of Flores in Indonesia. Incomplete skeletons of nine individuals have been recovered, including one complete cranium. These remains have been the focus of intense research to establish whether they represent a species distinctive from modern humans....

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Stag-Moose, Cervalces scotti
2012-05-11 12:12:45

The stag-moose (Cervalces scotti) is also known as the stag moose and was actually a deer that resembled a moose. It resided in North America during the Pleistocene era. Its range included New Jersey and Iowa, reach north from Arkansas to Southern Canada. It inhabited wetlands in these areas. This animal had long legs, a head resembling an elk, and huge, complex antlers. The stag-moose became extinct during the mass extinction of large mammals that occurred in the last Ice Age on North...

Shrub-ox, Euceratherium collinum
2012-05-10 05:18:10

The shrub-ox (Euceratherium collinum) is a close relative of the modern musk-ox, and is an extinct member of the family Bovidae. It inhabited North America during the late Pleistocene, appearing before the first bovids entered North America from Eurasia. These muskoxen became extinct approximately 11,500 years ago. The shrub-ox was very large, approximately in between the sizes of a musk-ox and an American Bison. Research done on pellets left by these oxen shows that they browsed for food...

More Articles (23 articles) »