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Latest Pleistocene extinctions Stories

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2008-04-10 01:30:00

The remains of an ancient mammoth discovered in the Russian Arctic are providing scientists with an unprecedented view of the inner structure of the prehistoric animal.Named "Lyuba" after the wife of the hunter who discovered her in May 2007, the female mammoth presumably died almost 40,000 years ago at no more than six months in age. Upon its discovery, the calf was well preserved with its eyes and trunk in tact and some fur still remained on its body. The calf's remains were sent to Jikei...

2008-04-03 11:08:04

Humans may have struck the final blow that killed the woolly-mammoth, but climate change seems to have played a major part in setting up the end-game, according to a new study. Though mammoth populations declined severely around 12,000 years ago, they didn't completely disappear until around 3,600 years ago. Scientists have long debated what finally drove the furry beasts over the edge. Researchers led by David Nogues-Bravo of the National Museum of Natural Sciences in Spain used...

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2008-04-01 00:25:00

Climate change and human development played key roles in the eventual extinction of ancient woolly mammoths, according to a Spanish study released in the journal PLoS Biology on Tuesday.The cold-adapted mammals had survived previous warming periods, but the species was ultimately weakened following a climate increase during the Holocene epoch that made them susceptible to human expansion."The collapse of the climatic niche of the mammoth caused a significant drop in their population...

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2008-03-27 01:05:00

Recent findings show evidence that humans lived in Europe up to 1.2 million years ago, about 400,000 years more than was previously estimated. The jawbone discovered at the archaeological site of Atapuerca, now part of modern-day Spain, represents that of the oldest known human inhabitants of Europe. Along with the jawbone, they found teeth and basic tools in the cave near the city of Burgos. The bone's small size indicates that it could have belonged to a female. The caves of Sierre de...

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2008-03-10 14:40:00

Since the reporting of the so-called "hobbit" fossil from the island of Flores in Indonesia, debate has raged as to whether these remains are of modern humans (Homo sapiens), reduced, for some reason, in stature, or whether they represent a new species, Homo floresiensis. Reporting in this week's PLoS ONE in a study funded by the National Geographic Society Mission Programs, Lee Berger and colleagues from the University of the Witwatersrand, Rutgers University and Duke University, describe...

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2008-03-05 14:32:08

A recent study is bringing new perspective to the debate over whether miniature bone fossils found in the Liang Bua Cave belonged to a new human species or not. In the study, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, researchers hypothesized that the bones found on Flores, Indonesia belonged to myxoedematous endemic cretins who were born with a type of dwarfism. "Our research suggests that these fossils are not a new species but rather the remains of human hunter-gatherers...

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2008-01-17 09:05:00

Pound for pound, Australia's extinct marsupial lion (Thylacoleo carnifex) would have made mince meat of today's African lion (Panthera leo) had the two big hyper-carnivores ever squared off in a fight to the death, according to an Australian scientist. New research published in the Journal of Zoology suggests that Thylacoleo killed prey rapidly, using its "bolt-cutter" type teeth to scissor through hide and flesh to produce major trauma and blood loss. By contrast, African lions and similar...

2007-12-27 03:00:14

By Forth, Gregory Abstract Originally a figure of folklore, the European wildman gained prominence as a literary and artistic figure in the late Middle Ages, and in this form has commonly been interpreted as exercising a definite influence on later European representations of non-western peoples, non-human primates, and pre-sapiens hominids. Comparing the European image with wildman images encountered among indigenous peoples outside of Europe, this essay comprises a critical review of such...

2007-10-02 18:55:45

WASHINGTON (AP) - The ancient saber-toothed cat had some pretty scary dentures, but when it came down to actually biting, well, it was no lion. In fact, a study of the cat's jaw indicated it has only about one-third the biting power of a modern lion, according to a study in Tuesday's edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Researchers led by Colin R. McHenry at the University of Newcastle in Australia used computer modeling to calculate the bite force of the cat, Smilodon...

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2007-09-20 15:50:00

WASHINGTON -- Scientists, wringing their hands over the identity of the famed "hobbit" fossil, have found a new clue in the wrist. Since the discovery of the bones in Indonesia in 2003, researchers have wrangled over whether the find was an ancient human ancestor or simply a modern human suffering from a genetic disorder. Now, a study of the bones in the creature's left wrist lends weight to the human ancestor theory, according to a report in Friday's issue of the journal Science. The wrist...


Latest Pleistocene extinctions Reference Libraries

Australopithecus garhi
2013-11-29 11:38:51

Australopithecus garhi is a gracile australopithecine species whose fossils were discovered in 1996 by a research team led by Ethiopian paleontologist Berhane Asfaw ad Tim White, an American paleontologist. The remains are believed to be a human ancestor species and most likely the direct ancestor to the human genus Homo. Tim White was the scientist to find the first of the key A. garhi fossils in 1996 within the Bouri Formation found in the Middle Awash of Ethiopia’s Afar Depression....

Homo floresiensis
2013-09-16 13:06:40

Homo floresiensis Homo floresiensis, or Flores Man, nicknamed “hobbit” and “Flow”, is an extinct species in the genus Homo. The remains of an individual that would have stood about 3 feet in height were uncovered in 2003 on the island of Flores in Indonesia. Incomplete skeletons of nine individuals have been recovered, including one complete cranium. These remains have been the focus of intense research to establish whether they represent a species distinctive from modern humans....

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Stag-Moose, Cervalces scotti
2012-05-11 12:12:45

The stag-moose (Cervalces scotti) is also known as the stag moose and was actually a deer that resembled a moose. It resided in North America during the Pleistocene era. Its range included New Jersey and Iowa, reach north from Arkansas to Southern Canada. It inhabited wetlands in these areas. This animal had long legs, a head resembling an elk, and huge, complex antlers. The stag-moose became extinct during the mass extinction of large mammals that occurred in the last Ice Age on North...

Shrub-ox, Euceratherium collinum
2012-05-10 05:18:10

The shrub-ox (Euceratherium collinum) is a close relative of the modern musk-ox, and is an extinct member of the family Bovidae. It inhabited North America during the late Pleistocene, appearing before the first bovids entered North America from Eurasia. These muskoxen became extinct approximately 11,500 years ago. The shrub-ox was very large, approximately in between the sizes of a musk-ox and an American Bison. Research done on pellets left by these oxen shows that they browsed for food...

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Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.