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Latest Pleistocene extinctions Stories

2007-09-10 12:00:00

A 10-year-old Alaska boy who found a woolly mammoth tooth the size of a toaster said he's determined to find more of the ancient beast. J.P. Post was walking home from school in Fairbanks last month when he spotted what he thought was a jagged rock sticking out of the ground along a well-worn path about 100 yards from his home, the Fairbanks (Alaska) Daily-News Miner reported Monday. He dug it up with his hands and ran home yelling, Dad, I found a dinosaur tooth. The find has been confirmed...

2007-08-11 00:17:24

By LOS ANGELES TIMES A 11/2-million-year-old skull and an equally old jaw found in Kenya are helping rewrite the history of early man, eliminating one reputed ancestor from the human lineage and suggesting that another was much more primitive than previously believed, researchers said. The jawbone shows that Homo habilis, previously believed to be a direct ancestor of Homo erectus and thus of humans, lived side by side with H. erectus, making them sister species rather than mother and...

2007-08-09 18:03:03

Text of report by Kenyan KTN TV on 9 August Kenyan archaeologists today launched an unprecedented challenge on Charles Darwin's human evolution theory. An archaeologist Fredrick Manthi claims two fossils found around Lake Turkana indicate that man may not have evolved from an inferior human-like creature as suggested by the theory. Manthi, who has been studying the fossils for the last seven years, claims human species named homo habilis and homo erectus lived in the same location at the...

2007-08-09 15:02:21

By Wendy Leonard Deseret Morning News Early human fossils found and researched by a group containing two Utah scholars may challenge popular notions of how humanity evolved. "For most of geologic time there was more than one type of early man running around, and this documents it pretty well for this interval of 1.4 (million) to 1.9 million years ago," said Frank Brown, dean of the College of Mines and Earth Sciences at the University of Utah. "The real difference is that people used to...

2007-08-09 03:10:00

By Steve Bloomfield Two fossils discovered in northern Kenya directly challenge the established view that there was a linear progression from apes to humans. Scientists have long believed that humans today, Homo sapiens, descended from Homo erectus, which in turn evolved from Homo habilis. But new research, led by the world-renowned palaeontologist Meave Leakey, suggests that Homo habilis and Homo erectus lived side by side in eastern Africa for more than 500,000 years. Dr Leakey's team...

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2007-08-08 18:03:19

By SETH BORENSTEIN WASHINGTON - Surprising research based on two African fossils suggests our family tree is more like a wayward bush with stubby branches, challenging what had been common thinking on how early humans evolved. The discovery by Meave Leakey, a member of a famous family of paleontologists, shows that two species of early human ancestors lived at the same time in Kenya. That pokes holes in the chief theory of man's early evolution - that one of those species evolved from the...

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2007-08-08 13:45:00

WASHINGTON -- Surprising fossils dug up in Africa are creating messy kinks in the iconic straight line of human evolution with its knuckle-dragging ape and briefcase-carrying man. The new research by famed paleontologist Meave Leakey in Kenya shows our family tree is more like a wayward bush with stubby branches, calling into question the evolution of our ancestors. The old theory was that the first and oldest species in our family tree, Homo habilis, evolved into Homo erectus, which then...

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2007-08-01 03:00:00

By Simon Usborne It was 1974 and Dr Donald Johanson and his student, Tom Gray, were heading back to camp after a fruitless morning searching for fossils in the scorched ravines of Ethiopia's Afar Depression. Then something in the dust caught Gray's eye. It was part of an arm, immediately recognisable as hominid, or human-like. As the American paleoanthropologists looked further, they spotted fragments of a skull, thigh, ribs and jaw. Bone sightings in the Awash valley, one of the world's...

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2007-04-17 09:00:00

PARIS - If you were looking for the skeleton of a prehistoric mammoth, Monday was your day to buy. Christie's auction house sold one for $421,200 - a world record. The unidentified buyer was a European who collects contemporary art and 19th century furniture, Christie's spokeswoman Capucine Milliot said. The mammoth sale was one of a dozen world records set during Monday's auction of paleontological curiosities that brought in a total of more than $1.53 million, Christie's said. The...

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2007-03-13 13:50:00

An international research team led by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (Leipzig, Germany) and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France) has found evidence that some of the earliest members of our species had evolved our characteristically long developmental period, and most likely our extended childhood, over 160,000 years ago. These findings are in contrast to studies that suggest that early fossil hominins possessed short growth...


Latest Pleistocene extinctions Reference Libraries

Australopithecus garhi
2013-11-29 11:38:51

Australopithecus garhi is a gracile australopithecine species whose fossils were discovered in 1996 by a research team led by Ethiopian paleontologist Berhane Asfaw ad Tim White, an American paleontologist. The remains are believed to be a human ancestor species and most likely the direct ancestor to the human genus Homo. Tim White was the scientist to find the first of the key A. garhi fossils in 1996 within the Bouri Formation found in the Middle Awash of Ethiopia’s Afar Depression....

Homo floresiensis
2013-09-16 13:06:40

Homo floresiensis Homo floresiensis, or Flores Man, nicknamed “hobbit” and “Flow”, is an extinct species in the genus Homo. The remains of an individual that would have stood about 3 feet in height were uncovered in 2003 on the island of Flores in Indonesia. Incomplete skeletons of nine individuals have been recovered, including one complete cranium. These remains have been the focus of intense research to establish whether they represent a species distinctive from modern humans....

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Stag-Moose, Cervalces scotti
2012-05-11 12:12:45

The stag-moose (Cervalces scotti) is also known as the stag moose and was actually a deer that resembled a moose. It resided in North America during the Pleistocene era. Its range included New Jersey and Iowa, reach north from Arkansas to Southern Canada. It inhabited wetlands in these areas. This animal had long legs, a head resembling an elk, and huge, complex antlers. The stag-moose became extinct during the mass extinction of large mammals that occurred in the last Ice Age on North...

Shrub-ox, Euceratherium collinum
2012-05-10 05:18:10

The shrub-ox (Euceratherium collinum) is a close relative of the modern musk-ox, and is an extinct member of the family Bovidae. It inhabited North America during the late Pleistocene, appearing before the first bovids entered North America from Eurasia. These muskoxen became extinct approximately 11,500 years ago. The shrub-ox was very large, approximately in between the sizes of a musk-ox and an American Bison. Research done on pellets left by these oxen shows that they browsed for food...

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Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.