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Latest Pleistocene extinctions Stories

Saber-tooth Cats In The Late Pleistocene May Not Have Starved
2012-12-27 06:30:23

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study, led by Vanderbilt University, reveals that American lions and saber-toothed cats that roamed the North American continent in the last Pleistocene were living well off the fat of the land. The results of this study, published in PLOS ONE, were gathered from microscopic wear patterns on the teeth of these great cats recovered from the La Brea Tar Pits in southern California. The study, contrary to prior analysis, did not...

Researchers Uncover Dire Wolf Fossils Near Las Vegas
2012-12-18 12:02:59

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers announced that they have discovered fossil remains from a dire wolf, revealing the first confirmation that the extinct predator once stalked the Silver State. UNLV geologist Josh Bonde found the wolf´s metapodial (foot bone) last year while surveying the Upper Las Vegas Wash, located just northwest of Las Vegas. They were later able to confirm that the bone is between 10,000...

Homo Floresiensis Facial Reconstruction Revealed
2012-12-12 06:09:02

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the major features of the Australian Archaeological Association's (AAA) Conference at the University of Wollongong this week was the unveiling of the face of Homo floresiensis — popularly known as the "Hobbit." Hosted by UOW´s Centre for Archaeological Science, which was created in 2010 to develop, integrate and apply modern scientific methods to the questions of human evolution, the conference consists of over 400...

Spear Tips Were Used A Half Million Years Ago
2012-11-16 06:26:11

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A team of anthropologists, led by the University of Toronto, has found evidence that human ancestors used stone tipped weapons for hunting 500,000 years ago. This is 200,000 years earlier than previously thought, according to the new study published in Science. "This changes the way we think about early human adaptations and capacities before the origin of our own species," says Jayne Wilkins, a PhD candidate in the Department of...

Woolly Mammoth Discovered Near Paris, France
2012-11-07 15:02:24

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Sully didn't exactly have a French accent in the Ice Age movies, but the creators may want to rethink that with the latest archaeology find. Archaeologists have unearthed the remains of a woolly mammoth northeast of Paris, according to the French National Institute for Preventative Archaeological Research (INRAP). The remains found at Changis-sur-Marne included a femur, a complete pelvis, jawbones and four connected...

Ancient Predators Shared Their Food Supply
2012-11-07 13:53:07

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Your mother probably told you that it´s considered good manners to share your food, but according to new research; for large predators living 9 million years ago, sharing a food supply was a daily way of life. To better understand how these ancient predators divided up the available prey, a team of researchers led by US researchers and the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales in Madrid used radioactive dating technology and a...

Russian Boy Finds 30,000-Year-Old Well-Preserved Mammoth Fossil
2012-10-05 09:09:50

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It´s not everyday that a young boy makes the discovery of a lifetime. But for Yevgeny Salinder, an 11-year-old boy from Russia, the discovery of a 30,000 year-old fossil was the first find of this kind in the region in more than a hundred years. After unearthing the remains of a nearly intact woolly mammoth, Salinder raced home to alert his parents, who then called authorities. Scientists who rushed to the scene, were shocked...

Mammoth Tooth Unearthed In California
2012-09-14 04:25:01

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online How did your Monday at work go?  Mine was pretty much the same as every Monday. Not so for Brandon Valasik in San Francisco, however. Valasik works at the Transbay Transit Center construction site as a crane operator. On Monday, he found a tooth. A woolly mammoth tooth, approximately 10 inches long, broken in two and missing a chunk, to be exact. The woolly mammoth roamed the grassy valley that is now San Francisco Bay...

Woolly Mammoth Remains May Contain Living Cells
2012-09-12 07:24:22

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An international team of scientists, led by North-Eastern Federal University of Russia, have discovered frozen woolly mammoth fragments that could contain living cells deep in Siberia, bringing closer the possibility of cloning the extinct animals. This sounds like a twisted mammalian version of Jurassic Park, but it isn't fiction. According to the Associated Press, the team discovered mammoth hair, soft tissues and bone marrow at...


Latest Pleistocene extinctions Reference Libraries

Australopithecus garhi
2013-11-29 11:38:51

Australopithecus garhi is a gracile australopithecine species whose fossils were discovered in 1996 by a research team led by Ethiopian paleontologist Berhane Asfaw ad Tim White, an American paleontologist. The remains are believed to be a human ancestor species and most likely the direct ancestor to the human genus Homo. Tim White was the scientist to find the first of the key A. garhi fossils in 1996 within the Bouri Formation found in the Middle Awash of Ethiopia’s Afar Depression....

Homo floresiensis
2013-09-16 13:06:40

Homo floresiensis Homo floresiensis, or Flores Man, nicknamed “hobbit” and “Flow”, is an extinct species in the genus Homo. The remains of an individual that would have stood about 3 feet in height were uncovered in 2003 on the island of Flores in Indonesia. Incomplete skeletons of nine individuals have been recovered, including one complete cranium. These remains have been the focus of intense research to establish whether they represent a species distinctive from modern humans....

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Stag-Moose, Cervalces scotti
2012-05-11 12:12:45

The stag-moose (Cervalces scotti) is also known as the stag moose and was actually a deer that resembled a moose. It resided in North America during the Pleistocene era. Its range included New Jersey and Iowa, reach north from Arkansas to Southern Canada. It inhabited wetlands in these areas. This animal had long legs, a head resembling an elk, and huge, complex antlers. The stag-moose became extinct during the mass extinction of large mammals that occurred in the last Ice Age on North...

Shrub-ox, Euceratherium collinum
2012-05-10 05:18:10

The shrub-ox (Euceratherium collinum) is a close relative of the modern musk-ox, and is an extinct member of the family Bovidae. It inhabited North America during the late Pleistocene, appearing before the first bovids entered North America from Eurasia. These muskoxen became extinct approximately 11,500 years ago. The shrub-ox was very large, approximately in between the sizes of a musk-ox and an American Bison. Research done on pellets left by these oxen shows that they browsed for food...

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Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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