Quantcast

Latest Pleistocene extinctions Stories

Mammoth Tooth Unearthed In California
2012-09-14 04:25:01

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online How did your Monday at work go?  Mine was pretty much the same as every Monday. Not so for Brandon Valasik in San Francisco, however. Valasik works at the Transbay Transit Center construction site as a crane operator. On Monday, he found a tooth. A woolly mammoth tooth, approximately 10 inches long, broken in two and missing a chunk, to be exact. The woolly mammoth roamed the grassy valley that is now San Francisco Bay...

Woolly Mammoth Remains May Contain Living Cells
2012-09-12 07:24:22

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An international team of scientists, led by North-Eastern Federal University of Russia, have discovered frozen woolly mammoth fragments that could contain living cells deep in Siberia, bringing closer the possibility of cloning the extinct animals. This sounds like a twisted mammalian version of Jurassic Park, but it isn't fiction. According to the Associated Press, the team discovered mammoth hair, soft tissues and bone marrow at...

Human Skull Discovery Forces Rethink On Modern Man's Migration
2012-08-22 13:37:38

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A human skull that was recently found in Southeast Asia provides new details in the story of modern man´s migration out of Africa, through Asia, and beyond to the Pacific. While anthropologists have long theorized that humans emerged from Africa and into East and Southeast Asia around 60,000 years ago, there has been a significant lack of fossil evidence to support these claims. The earliest skull fossil evidence in the region had...

50 Years After The Leakeys, Dawn Of Humanity Illuminated In Special Journal Edition
2012-08-21 10:16:51

Wits' scientists are part of the most comprehensive research to come out of Olduvai in East Africa since the early 1980s The first systematic, multidisciplinary results to come out of research conducted on the edge of the Serengeti at the rich palaeoanthropological site in the Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania since that produced by Louis and Mary Leakey's team, have recently been published in a special issue of the prestigious Journal of Human Evolution. Professor Marion Bamford, deputy...

What Did Early Hominins Eat?
2012-08-09 08:16:46

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An international team of scientists has reconstructed the dietary preferences of 3 groups of hominins found in South Africa. The paper, “Evidence for diet but not landscape use in South African early hominins," is a joint effort between the Ecole Normale Supérieure, the Université de Toulouse Paul Sabatier, and the University of the Witwatersrand and has been selected for Advanced Online Publication in...

shutterstock_13978870
2012-08-08 21:14:25

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As the human and primate fossil records become more complete, researchers are beginning to see the amount of complexity involved in man´s evolution. That evolutionary tree became even more complex with the discovery of new fossils that suggest there were two additional Homo species living alongside our direct ancestors, Homo erectus, around two million years ago. According to a report published in the journal Nature...

Climate Change Linked To Woolly Mammoth Decline
2012-06-14 08:29:59

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com New evidence points to a dual conspiracy of climate change factors and hunting activities by early man that to drove the woolly mammoth to extinction between 4,000 and 10,000 years ago. The gradual decline of the sub-Arctic giant was likely caused in part by global warming induced changes in habitat, according to a new report published by an American-led research team in Nature Communications this week. These changes included a decline in the mammoths' food...

2012-06-12 14:17:21

Although humans and woolly mammoths co-existed for millennia, the shaggy giants disappeared from the globe between 4,000 and 10,000 years ago, and scientists couldn't explain until recently exactly how the Flinstonian behemoths went extinct. In a paper published June 12 in the journal Nature Communications, UCLA researchers and colleagues reveal that not long after the last ice age, the last woolly mammoths succumbed to a lethal combination of climate warming, encroaching humans and...

Ecosystem Changes Drove Extinction In Pleistocene Australia
2012-06-07 06:50:19

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com Scientists may have finally established the explanation for the disappearance of the giant koala and other Australian megafauna. Between 50,000 and 45,000 years ago, around 60 species of mammals, predominantly foraging herbivores called browsers, went extinct. These animals included 19 species that weighed over 100 kilograms, like the rhinoceros-sized giant wombat and half-ton marsupial Palorchestes azael. Slightly smaller animals like the flightless bird...


Latest Pleistocene extinctions Reference Libraries

Australopithecus garhi
2013-11-29 11:38:51

Australopithecus garhi is a gracile australopithecine species whose fossils were discovered in 1996 by a research team led by Ethiopian paleontologist Berhane Asfaw ad Tim White, an American paleontologist. The remains are believed to be a human ancestor species and most likely the direct ancestor to the human genus Homo. Tim White was the scientist to find the first of the key A. garhi fossils in 1996 within the Bouri Formation found in the Middle Awash of Ethiopia’s Afar Depression....

Homo floresiensis
2013-09-16 13:06:40

Homo floresiensis Homo floresiensis, or Flores Man, nicknamed “hobbit” and “Flow”, is an extinct species in the genus Homo. The remains of an individual that would have stood about 3 feet in height were uncovered in 2003 on the island of Flores in Indonesia. Incomplete skeletons of nine individuals have been recovered, including one complete cranium. These remains have been the focus of intense research to establish whether they represent a species distinctive from modern humans....

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Stag-Moose, Cervalces scotti
2012-05-11 12:12:45

The stag-moose (Cervalces scotti) is also known as the stag moose and was actually a deer that resembled a moose. It resided in North America during the Pleistocene era. Its range included New Jersey and Iowa, reach north from Arkansas to Southern Canada. It inhabited wetlands in these areas. This animal had long legs, a head resembling an elk, and huge, complex antlers. The stag-moose became extinct during the mass extinction of large mammals that occurred in the last Ice Age on North...

Shrub-ox, Euceratherium collinum
2012-05-10 05:18:10

The shrub-ox (Euceratherium collinum) is a close relative of the modern musk-ox, and is an extinct member of the family Bovidae. It inhabited North America during the late Pleistocene, appearing before the first bovids entered North America from Eurasia. These muskoxen became extinct approximately 11,500 years ago. The shrub-ox was very large, approximately in between the sizes of a musk-ox and an American Bison. Research done on pellets left by these oxen shows that they browsed for food...

More Articles (23 articles) »
Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
Related