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Pleistocene extinctions Reference Libraries

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Australopithecus garhi
2013-11-29 11:38:51

Australopithecus garhi is a gracile australopithecine species whose fossils were discovered in 1996 by a research team led by Ethiopian paleontologist Berhane Asfaw ad Tim White, an American paleontologist. The remains are believed to be a human ancestor species and most likely the direct ancestor to the human genus Homo. Tim White was the scientist to find the first of the key A. garhi...

Homo floresiensis
2013-09-16 13:06:40

Homo floresiensis Homo floresiensis, or Flores Man, nicknamed “hobbit” and “Flow”, is an extinct species in the genus Homo. The remains of an individual that would have stood about 3 feet in height were uncovered in 2003 on the island of Flores in Indonesia. Incomplete skeletons of nine individuals have been recovered, including one complete cranium. These remains have been the focus...

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from...

Stag-Moose Cervalces scotti
2012-05-11 12:12:45

The stag-moose (Cervalces scotti) is also known as the stag moose and was actually a deer that resembled a moose. It resided in North America during the Pleistocene era. Its range included New Jersey and Iowa, reach north from Arkansas to Southern Canada. It inhabited wetlands in these areas. This animal had long legs, a head resembling an elk, and huge, complex antlers. The stag-moose...

Shrub-ox Euceratherium collinum
2012-05-10 05:18:10

The shrub-ox (Euceratherium collinum) is a close relative of the modern musk-ox, and is an extinct member of the family Bovidae. It inhabited North America during the late Pleistocene, appearing before the first bovids entered North America from Eurasia. These muskoxen became extinct approximately 11,500 years ago. The shrub-ox was very large, approximately in between the sizes of a musk-ox...

Harlans Muskox Bootherium bombifrons
2012-05-10 05:13:48

Harlan’s muskox (Bootherium bombifrons) is an extinct type of bovine, also known as the woodland muskox.  It lived in North American during the late Pleistocene era, and was one of the most widely distributed oxen at that time. This bison died out around 11,000 years ago. Many fossils of Harlan’s muskox have been found in New Jersey, Texas, Oklahoma, Alaska, and California, including a...

Steppe Wisent Bison priscus
2012-05-10 05:08:05

The steppe wisent (Bison priscus) or steppe bison was common to North America, Central Asia, Europe, and Beringia during the Quaternary period. It is thought that the steppe bison appeared around the same time as the aurochs , an extinct type of cattle, in Asia. Descendants of the steppe bison are often confused with the aurochs species. During the late Pleistocene era, the steppe wisent became...

Bison antiquus
2012-05-09 11:50:25

Bison antiquus, otherwise known as the antique bison, was the most common large plant-eating mammal in North America for more than ten thousand years. Between 240,000 and 220,000 years ago, during the late Pleistocene era, steppe wisent (Bison priscus) migrated from Siberia and to Alaska, and eventually was replaced in mid North America by Bison latifrons. From this species, the antique bison...

Equus Scotti
2012-05-08 14:12:16

Equus scotti is an extinct species in the genus that contains horses, Equus. This name translates to “Scotti’s Horse” from Latin, and was given to the extinct equine by a paleontologist of vertebrates named William Berryman Scott. Native to North America, it is thought that Equus scotti evolved from a creature that resembled a zebra more than a horse during the early Pleistocene Epoch...

Camelops Camelops hesternus
2012-05-08 08:14:21

Camelops, an extinct genus of camel, was found in North America in places like Arizona and they first appeared there in the late Pliocene era. There are six known species in this genus. Camelops became extinct at the end of the Pleistocene era, around ten thousand years ago. The Camelops extinction was part of a larger die-off of other large animals including mastodons, horses, and camelids....

Word of the Day
lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
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