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Latest Pleuronectiformes Stories

2010-08-18 15:21:00

WASHINGTON, Aug. 18 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Lee Crockett, director of federal fisheries policy for The Pew Environment Group, issued this statement today in response to the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council's decision to increase the quota for summer flounder by 7.35 million pounds to 29.48 million pounds for 2011. This reflects an 86.9 percent increase from a low of 15.77 million pounds in 2008. A National Marine Fisheries Service assessment indicated that the rebuilding plan is...

2008-08-06 15:00:27

By Kirk Moore, Asbury Park Press, N.J. Aug. 6--A scientific reappraisal of the East Coast summer flounder stock shows the flatfish population is much closer to a full recovery than previously thought, a finding that could allow the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council to move today toward allowing a modest increase in fishermen's catches for 2009. "This is the first time in years that overfishing is not occurring," said scientist James Weinberg of the federal fisheries science...

2008-07-11 09:00:18

By WILLIAM MULLEN By William Mullen Chicago Tribune CHICAGO Some dusty fossil fish spotted by a sharp-eyed University of Chicago doctoral student as he rummaged through forgotten corners of museum collections in Europe have solved a question that has long vexed scientists. The puzzling question was: How did flatfish, a bizarre, highly specialized group of bottom-feeding fish - sole, plaice, turbot, flounder and halibut among them - end up with both of their eyes on one side of their...

2008-07-10 09:00:00

By William Mullen, Chicago Tribune Jul. 10--Some dusty fish fossils spotted by a sharp-eyed University of Chicago doctoral student as he rummaged through forgotten corners of museum collections in Europe have answered a question that has long vexed scientists. The puzzling question was: How did flatfish, a bizarre, highly specialized group of bottom-feeding fish that are some of nature's most delicious creatures--sole, plaice, turbot, flounder and halibut among them--end up with both of...


Latest Pleuronectiformes Reference Libraries

39_affbb4563df9360e2619a62f67bea93e
2007-02-25 21:09:35

The crested flounder, Lophonectes gallus, is a Lefteye flounder of the genus Lophonectes, found around south eastern Australia, and New Zealand, in shallow enclosed waters such as estuaries, harbors, mudflats, and sandflats, in waters less than 787.4 ft (240 m) in depth. Their length is from 3.94 to 7.87 in (10 to 20 cm). The crested flounder is a Lefteye flounder meaning it has both eyes on the left side of the head and lies on its right side. It has the typical flattened oval shape of...

39_c8c2b883d9e7e70d1e072ed2f512ba89
2007-02-25 21:07:19

The Witch, Arnoglossus scapha, is a Lefteye flounder of the genus Arnoglossus, found around China and New Zealand, in waters less than 0.25 mi (400 m) in depth. Their length is from 7.87 to 15.75 in (20 to 40 cm). The Witch is a Lefteye flounder meaning it has both eyes on the left side of the head and lies on its right side. It has the typical flattened oval shape of the flounder with the dorsal and anal fins forming a fringe around most of the body. The lateral line forms a strong arch...

Lined Sole, Achirus lineatus
2009-02-16 20:26:55

The Lined Sole (Achirus lineatus) is a species of saltwater fish that is found in the Western Atlantic, and northern Gulf of Mexico south to northern Argentina. It occurs mainly in brackish or hyper-saline lagoons, or on sandy-muddy bottoms of estuaries as well as the littoral zone. It is sometimes confused with the Hogchoker (Trinectes maculatus). The lined sole is defined by its ocular-side pectoral fin with 2 - 8 rays, and the blind-side pectoral fin with a single ray or none at all. It...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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