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Latest Pliocene Stories

Arctic Winters Were Ice-Free Three To Five Million Years Ago
2013-07-30 06:29:43

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online During the Pliocene Epoch, the Earth was substantially warmer than it is today, despite similar concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. A new study, led by the University of Colorado Boulder, suggests year-round ice-free conditions across the surface of the Arctic Ocean could explain the difference. The study was published in a recent issue of Palaeogeography, Paleoclimatology, Palaeoecology. A new record was marked by...

Ancient Antarctic Ice Melt 66 Feet
2013-07-22 08:50:47

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A large team of international researchers has looked millions of years into the Antarctic past and found evidence that massive sections of the continent's eastern ice sheet once melted to raise sea levels by around 66 feet. "Scientists previously considered the East Antarctic ice sheet to be more stable than the much smaller ice sheets in West Antarctica and Greenland, even though very few studies of East Antarctic ice...

2013-06-13 12:37:03

Tooth enamel reveals diet, habitats of extinct marsupials in southeastern Queensland The teeth of a kangaroo and other extinct marsupials reveal that southeastern Queensland 2.5-5-million-years ago was a mosaic of tropical forests, wetlands and grasslands and much less arid than previously thought. The chemical analysis of tooth enamel that suggests this diverse prehistoric habitat is published June 12 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Shaena Montanari from the American Museum of...

Climate Predictions Could Take Some Clues From The Pliocene Epoch
2013-04-04 06:51:19

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Temperature patterns during Earth´s last prolonged global “hot spell” some 5.3 million to 2.6 million years ago differed markedly from those of modern times, suggesting current climate models may need to be adjusted to improve future predictions, according to a study published this week in the journal Nature. The Earth was warmer during that time - known as the Pliocene Epoch - than it is today, and had higher...

Fossils of Gaint Camel Ancestor Discovered In Northern Canada
2013-03-05 15:59:17

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers have discovered the fossilized remains of a giant prehistoric species of camel in the far northern regions of Canada, suggesting that the modern versions of these hoofed creatures are descended from ancestors which lived within the Arctic Circle. A team led by paleontologist Dr. Natalia Rybczynski of the Canadian Museum of Nature found 30 fossil fragments of a leg bone on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, during the summers...

Questions About Human Evolution Raised In New Geological Study
2013-02-01 10:35:18

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Long before anyone pondered whether the chicken or the egg came first, there was another mystery that plagues us still to this day. Well, at least, until earlier this month. There has been some light shone on the question, “What came first: the bipedal human ancestor or the grasslands which spread across the African continent, reclaiming territory from the shrinking forests?" An ambitious analysis of the past 12 million years...

Eltanin meteor
2012-09-20 04:27:37

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Around 2.5 million years ago, a huge meteor collided with the Earth and fell into the southern Pacific Ocean. A new study, published in the Journal of Quaternary Science, suggests that not only could this have caused a massive tsunami, but it may also have plunged the world into the Ice Ages. A research team from Australia says that because the Eltanin meteor — which was up to two kilometers across — crashed into deep...

Mammal Diversity Aided In Survival Over Deep Time
2012-04-24 12:24:49

Lawrence LeBlond for RedOrbit.com In a first of its kind study, researchers from Vanderbilt University found that mammals´ best defense to adapting to climate change was diversity, and families with higher taxonomic diversity were better able to survive ongoing environmental changes. Larisa R. G. DeSantis, Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Vanderbilt, led researchers in studying how North American mammals adapted to climate change over a 56-million-year...

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2011-04-11 06:25:10

By Kim DeRose, UCLA By studying fossilized mollusks from some 3.5 million years ago, UCLA geoscientists and colleagues have been able to construct an ancient climate record that holds clues about the long-term effects of Earth's current levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, a key contributor to global climate change. Two novel geochemical techniques used to determine the temperature at which the mollusk shells were formed suggest that summertime Arctic temperatures during the early Pliocene...

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2011-04-08 09:42:28

University of Miami scientists using the geologic record of corals to understand how reef ecosystems might respond to climate changeClimate change is already widely recognized to be negatively affecting coral reef ecosystems around the world, yet the long-term effects are difficult to predict. University of Miami (UM) scientists are using the geologic record of Caribbean corals to understand how reef ecosystems might respond to climate change expected for this century. The findings are...


Latest Pliocene Reference Libraries

Australopithecus africanus
2013-11-29 10:55:07

Australopithecus africanus was an early hominid, an australopithecine that lived between roughly 3.03 and 2.04 million years ago in the later Pliocene and early Pleistocene. Au. africanus was of slender build and was thought to have been a direct ancestor of modern humans. Fossil remains signify that Au. africanus was considerably more like modern humans that Au. afarensis, with a more human-like cranium permitting a larger brain and more humanoid facial features. This hominid has only been...

Homotherium
2012-04-30 12:22:54

Homotherium, and extinct genus of machairodontine saber-toothed cats, was native to South America, North America, Europe, Africa, and Asia during the Pliocene era to the Pleistocene era. Homotherium can also be called the scimitar-toothed cat. This cat lived for approximately five million years, most likely dying out around ten thousand years ago. In Africa, Homotherium became extinct around 1.5 million years ago, lasting somewhat longer in Eurasia becoming extinct about 30,000 years ago....

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Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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