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Latest Pliocene Stories

Arctic Winters Were Ice-Free Three To Five Million Years Ago
2013-07-30 06:29:43

During the Pliocene Epoch, the Earth was substantially warmer than it is today, despite similar concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. A new study, led by the University of Colorado Boulder, suggests year-round ice-free conditions across the surface of the Arctic Ocean could explain the difference.

Ancient Antarctic Ice Melt 66 Feet
2013-07-22 08:50:47

A large team of international researchers has looked millions of years into the Antarctic past and found evidence that massive sections of the continent's eastern ice sheet once melted to raise sea levels by around 66 feet.

2013-06-13 12:37:03

The teeth of a kangaroo and other extinct marsupials reveal that southeastern Queensland 2.5-5-million-years ago was a mosaic of tropical forests, wetlands and grasslands and much less arid than previously thought.

Climate Predictions Could Take Some Clues From The Pliocene Epoch
2013-04-04 06:51:19

Temperature patterns during Earth’s last prolonged global “hot spell” some 5.3 million to 2.6 million years ago differed markedly from those of modern times, suggesting current climate models may need to be adjusted to improve future predictions.

Fossils of Gaint Camel Ancestor Discovered In Northern Canada
2013-03-05 15:59:17

Researchers have discovered the fossilized remains of a giant prehistoric species of camel in the far northern regions of Canada, suggesting that the modern versions of the hoofed creatures are descended from ancestors which lived within the Arctic Circle.

Questions About Human Evolution Raised In New Geological Study
2013-02-01 10:35:18

An ambitious analysis of the past 12 million years’ of vegetation change in northeastern Africa is proving to be a bit of a game change in the understanding of the world as it was when our ancestors first decided to walk on two feet.

Eltanin meteor
2012-09-20 04:27:37

Around 2.5 million years ago, a huge meteor collided with the Earth and fell into the southern Pacific Ocean. A new study suggests that not only could this have caused a massive tsunami, but it may also have plunged the world into the Ice Ages.

Mammal Diversity Aided In Survival Over Deep Time
2012-04-24 12:24:49

In a first of its kind study, researchers from Vanderbilt University found that mammals’ best defense to adapting to climate change was diversity, and families with higher taxonomic diversity were better able to survive ongoing environmental changes.

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2011-04-11 06:25:10

By studying fossilized mollusks, UCLA geoscientists and colleagues have been able to construct an ancient climate record that holds clues about the long-term effects of Earth's current levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, a key contributor to global climate change.

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2011-04-08 09:42:28

University of Miami scientists are using the geologic record of corals to understand how reef ecosystems might respond to climate change.


Latest Pliocene Reference Libraries

Australopithecus africanus
2013-11-29 10:55:07

Australopithecus africanus was an early hominid, an australopithecine that lived between roughly 3.03 and 2.04 million years ago in the later Pliocene and early Pleistocene. Au. africanus was of slender build and was thought to have been a direct ancestor of modern humans. Fossil remains signify that Au. africanus was considerably more like modern humans that Au. afarensis, with a more human-like cranium permitting a larger brain and more humanoid facial features. This hominid has only been...

Homotherium
2012-04-30 12:22:54

Homotherium, and extinct genus of machairodontine saber-toothed cats, was native to South America, North America, Europe, Africa, and Asia during the Pliocene era to the Pleistocene era. Homotherium can also be called the scimitar-toothed cat. This cat lived for approximately five million years, most likely dying out around ten thousand years ago. In Africa, Homotherium became extinct around 1.5 million years ago, lasting somewhat longer in Eurasia becoming extinct about 30,000 years ago....

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Word of the Day
megalophonous
  • Having a loud voice; vociferous; clamorous.
  • Of grand or imposing sound.
The word 'megalophonous' comes from Greek roots meaning 'big' and 'sound'.