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Latest PLoS Biology Stories

2012-08-21 22:34:36

An inexpensive antifungal drug, thiabendazole, slows tumor growth and shows promise as a chemotherapy for cancer. Scientists in the College of Natural Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin made this discovery by exploiting the evolutionary relatedness of yeast, frogs, mice and humans. Thiabendazole is an FDA-approved, generic drug taken orally that has been in clinical use for 40 years as an antifungal. It is not currently used for cancer therapy. Hye Ji Cha, Edward Marcotte,...

Vigilance Needed Against Evolution Of More-Virulent  Malaria Shown By Vaccine Research
2012-08-01 07:57:06

Malaria parasites evolving in vaccinated laboratory mice become more virulent, according to research at Penn State University. The mice were injected with a critical component of several candidate human malaria vaccines that now are being evaluated in clinical trials. "Our research shows immunization with this particular type of malaria vaccine can create ecological conditions that favor the evolution of parasites that cause more severe disease in unvaccinated mice," said Andrew Read, Alumni...

2012-07-18 10:29:08

Stress can promote breast cancer cell colonization of bone, Vanderbilt Center for Bone Biology investigators have discovered. The studies, reported July 17 in PLoS Biology, demonstrate in mice that activation of the sympathetic nervous system — the "fight-or-flight" response to stress — primes the bone environment for breast cancer cell metastasis. The researchers were able to prevent breast cancer cell lesions in bone using propranolol, a cardiovascular medicine that inhibits...

2012-06-20 11:13:47

Amyloid fibers in the brain are a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, for which there are no effective treatments. These fibers result from aggregation of a specific protein in each disease–in Parkinson's, for example, the aggregated protein is called alpha-synuclein. Although amyloid fibers are implicated in numerous pathologies, they can also play beneficial, protective roles. In yeast, for example, they are associated with increased survival...

2012-06-20 10:15:08

A group of Spanish researchers has discovered a new function of the neurotransmitter dopamine in controlling sleep regulation. Dopamine acts in the pineal gland, which is central to dictating the 'circadian rhythm' in humans–the series of biological processes that enables brain activity to adapt to the time of the day (that is, light and dark cycles). The researchers, from the CIBERNED (Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades...

2012-06-20 10:13:28

Twenty years ago, world leaders met at the UN Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro and agreed that rising income inequality, environmental destruction, and unchecked human population growth called for a radical shift in how nations approach economic development. And now world leaders meet in Rio de Janeiro again, at the UN Conference on Sustainable Development, or Rio+20, on 20-22 June 2012, to re-examine their commitments to sustainable development. Coinciding with Rio+20, the open-access...

2012-05-16 10:53:12

New research shows how bacteria evolve to increase ecosystem functioning by recycling each others waste. The study provides some of the first evidence for how interactions between species shape evolution when there is a diverse community. Predicting how species and ecosystems will respond to new environments is an important task for biology. However, most studies of evolutionary adaptation have considered single species in isolation, despite the fact that all species live in diverse...

Is The Possibly Of New Life Forms Really So Alien?
2012-05-09 07:44:18

The idea of discovering a new form of life has not only excited astronomers and astrobiologists for decades, but also the wider public. The notion that we are the only example of a successful life form in the galaxy has, for many, seemed like an unlikely statistic, as we discover more and more habitable planetary bodies and hear yet more evidence of life's ability to survive in extreme conditions. A new essay, published May 8 in the online, open-access journal PLoS Biology, examines what...

2012-05-02 09:58:03

Touch sensitivity is hereditary and linked to genetic mechanisms that support hearing Vision and hearing are so crucial to our daily lives that any impairments usually become obvious to an affected person. Although a number of known genetic mutations can lead to hereditary defects in these senses, little is known about our sense of touch, where defects might be so subtle that they go unnoticed. In the 1 May issue of the online, open-access journal PLoS Biology, Gary Lewin's laboratory...

2012-05-02 09:54:58

Findings from Johns Hopkins scientists hint at why certain brain cancers are so deadly Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered that a protein that transports sodium, potassium and chloride may hold clues to how glioblastoma, the most common and deadliest type of brain cancer, moves and invades nearby healthy brain tissue. The findings, reported in the journal PLoS Biology, also suggest that a cheap FDA-approved drug already on the market could slow movement of glioblastoma cells, and...


Latest PLoS Biology Reference Libraries

PLoS Medicine
2012-05-17 15:12:48

PLoS Medicine is a peer-reviewed medical journal established in October 2004. It is the second journal of the Public Library of Sciences, which publishes open-access material. All material in PLoS Medicine is published under the Creative Commons license. To fund the journal, the publication’s business model requires that authors pay publication costs. PLoS Medicine provides an innovative and influential venue for research and comment on the major challenges to human health worldwide. It...

PLoS Biology
2012-05-02 19:40:12

PLoS Biology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering all aspects of biology. It was established in 2003, with the first issue published in October of that year. It was the first journal of the Public Library of Science. As of May 2012, the current editor-in-chief is Jonathan Eisen (University of California, Davis). All content in PLoS Biology is published under the Creative Commons “by-attribution” license. The journal is funded by authors who are charged set fees to publish...

PLoS ONE
2012-04-30 14:56:25

PLoS ONE is an open-access peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS). It was established in 2006 as a beta version. In August 2008 it moved from a weekly publication schedule to a daily one, publishing articles as soon as they became ready. In October 2008, it came out of “beta.” In September 2009, PLoS ONE made full online usage of every published article publicly available. The founding managing editor was Chris Surridge. He was succeeded by...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'karpos', fruit.
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