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Latest PLoS Medicine Stories

2013-05-01 12:39:19

The first article in a landmark series to help health care workers and providers, donors, and decision makers understand the importance of including mental health care in global health programs is being published in this week's PLOS Medicine. Giving a global perspective on integrating mental health into health services around the world, the series focuses on mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders. Although these disorders account for an increasing burden of disease,...

2013-05-01 12:38:03

Individuals who have experienced a major bleed from their stomach or esophagus (known as an upper gastrointestinal bleed) may be more likely to die from other causes, particularly malignant tumors and cardiovascular disease, than those without an upper gastrointestinal bleed, according to a study by UK researchers published in this week's PLOS Medicine. These findings are important as they suggest that an upper gastrointestinal bleed may be either a cause or an indicator of a decline in a...

2013-05-01 12:36:38

Cinacalcet, a drug commonly given to patients with end stage kidney disease to help keep phosphorus and parathyroid blood levels within a target range and has few patient level clinical benefits and several adverse effects, suggesting that it should no longer be routinely prescribed, according to a study by international researchers published in this week's PLOS Medicine. These findings are important as cinacalcet has become the largest single drug cost for patients on dialysis in the US,...

2013-04-24 14:37:10

A prospective study by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) observed an association between risk of second primary cancer and history of non-melanoma skin cancer in white men and women. The researchers found that people with a history of non-melanoma skin cancer had a modestly increased risk of getting cancer in the future, specifically breast and lung cancer in women and melanoma in both men and women. Non-melanoma skin cancer, which includes basal cell and squamous cell...

2013-04-24 14:33:16

The alcohol industry, including the major supermarkets ignored, misrepresented and undermined international evidence on effective alcohol control policies in an attempt to influence public health policy in Scotland to its advantage, according to UK experts writing in this week's PLOS Medicine. The experts, led by Jim McCambridge from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, analyzed the alcohol industry's input into the Scottish Government's 2008 Consultation on "Changing...

2013-04-24 14:32:02

White people who have types of skin cancer other than melanoma (non-melanoma skin cancer) may be at increased risk of having other forms of cancer in the future, according to a study by US researchers published in this week's PLOS Medicine. The analysis, led by Dr. Jiali Han, an Associate Professor from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School in the US, found that men and women with a history of non-melanoma skin cancers–the most common form of cancer in the United...

2013-04-24 14:30:30

Long term exposure to air pollution may be linked to heart attacks and strokes by speeding up atherosclerosis, or "hardening of the arteries", according to a study by U.S. researchers published in this week's PLOS Medicine. The researchers, led by Sara Adar, John Searle Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, and Joel Kaufman, Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences and Medicine, University of Washington, found that higher...

2013-04-17 14:30:20

A partnership involving the public and private sector successfully addressed the mental health needs of people in the post-conflict regions of northern Uganda and could be used as a model in other post-conflict settings, according to a Health In Action article by Ugandan and US researchers published in this week's PLOS Medicine as part of an ongoing series on Global Mental Health Practice. The authors, led by Etheldreda Nakimuli-Mpungu from the University of Makerere in Uganda, explain how...

2013-04-17 14:27:14

Contrary to the positive findings of a previous pilot study, administration of a sodium bicarbonate-based infusion to induce urinary alkalinization during and after surgery does not reduce the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and may even cause harm in patients undergoing open heart surgery. These are the conclusions of a study by Anja Haase-Fielitz of the Otto-von-Guericke-University in Magdeburg, Germany, Rinaldo Bellomo of the Austin Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, and...

2013-04-17 14:24:12

Two common conditions in pregnancy may be risk factors for future diabetes according to a Canadian study of over one million women published in this week's PLOS Medicine. The researchers, led by Denice Feig from the University of Toronto, Canada, found that pre-eclampsia (a condition in which affected pregnant women have high blood pressure, fluid retention, and protein in their urine), and gestational hypertension (high blood pressure associated with pregnancy) could double the chance of...


Latest PLoS Medicine Reference Libraries

PLoS Medicine
2012-05-17 15:12:48

PLoS Medicine is a peer-reviewed medical journal established in October 2004. It is the second journal of the Public Library of Sciences, which publishes open-access material. All material in PLoS Medicine is published under the Creative Commons license. To fund the journal, the publication’s business model requires that authors pay publication costs. PLoS Medicine provides an innovative and influential venue for research and comment on the major challenges to human health worldwide. It...

PLoS Biology
2012-05-02 19:40:12

PLoS Biology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering all aspects of biology. It was established in 2003, with the first issue published in October of that year. It was the first journal of the Public Library of Science. As of May 2012, the current editor-in-chief is Jonathan Eisen (University of California, Davis). All content in PLoS Biology is published under the Creative Commons “by-attribution” license. The journal is funded by authors who are charged set fees to publish...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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