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Latest PLoS ONE Stories

2013-12-12 12:14:07

Pretreatment with near-infrared laser also could improve response to additional intradermal vaccines Pretreating the site of intradermal vaccination – vaccine delivered into the skin rather than to muscles beneath the skin – with a particular wavelength of laser light may substantially improve vaccine effectiveness without the adverse effects of chemical additives currently used to boost vaccine efficacy. In the open-access journal PLOS ONE, investigators from Vaccine and Immunotherapy...

2013-12-12 10:51:45

Poverty may have direct implications for important, early steps in the development of the brain, saddling children of low-income families with slower rates of growth in two key brain structures, according to researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. By age 4, children in families living with incomes under 200 percent of the federal poverty line have less gray matter — brain tissue critical for processing of information and execution of actions — than kids growing up in...

2013-12-12 10:49:59

Genetic signature identifies patients with more aggressive triple-negative cancers A new test has the potential to help physicians identify patients with the most lethal forms of triple-negative breast cancer, a disease which requires aggressive and innovative treatment. The test, described in the Dec. 11 issue of PLOS ONE, was able to distinguish between patients with a good or poor prognosis, even within groups of patients already stratified by existing tests such as MammaPrint and...

2013-12-12 10:27:54

The degree to which students' exam scores differ owes more to their genes than to their teachers, schools or family environments, according to new research from King's College London published today in PLOS ONE. The study, which took place in the UK, looked at students' scores for their GCSE's (General Certificate of Secondary Education), a UK-wide examination at the end of compulsory education at 16 years old. The authors explain that the findings do not imply that educational...

2013-12-10 10:33:23

Blood clots play an unexpected role in protecting the body from the deadly effects of bacteria by absorbing bacterial toxins, researchers at the University of California, Davis, have found. The research was published Dec. 2 in the journal PLoS ONE. "It's a significant addition to the short list of defenses that animals use to protect themselves against toxin-induced sepsis," said Peter Armstrong, professor of molecular and cellular biology at UC Davis and senior author on the paper....

2013-12-05 13:47:07

Novel simultaneous RNA-Seq analysis tracks host/pathogen interactions Investigators at the Institute for Genome Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have developed a new technique that can track the activity of a disease-causing microbe and the host cell response to that pathogen simultaneously. Using the new method to examine Chlamydia trachomatis infection, the study team observed how the response of the infected cell contributes to one of the hallmark outcomes of...

2013-12-05 10:31:04

The retinoblastoma (Rb) protein plays a critical role in suppressing the multi-step process of cell migration through the bloodstream, lymphovascular invasion and the metastasis of an aggressive type of breast cancer to the lung, researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) Cancer Institute, the Cincinnati Cancer Center (CCC) and the UC Brain Tumor Center have found. The findings of Rb's role at multiple points in the disease process point to a potential new therapeutic target in...

2013-12-04 10:50:59

PLOS ONE publishes "Assessing Dangerous Climate Change: Required Reductions of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People, Future Generations and Nature" from James Hansen and colleagues, and announces call for papers on responses to climate change: Research article assesses climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data, and uses Earth's measured energy imbalance and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission...

2013-12-03 13:48:07

Human papillomavirus, or HPV, which can cause cervical cancer in women, is also known to cause anal cancer in both women and men. Now, a study led by researchers at the UCLA School of Nursing has found that older HIV-positive men who have sex with men are at higher risk of becoming infected with the HPVs that most often cause anal cancer. The researchers also report that smoking increases the risk of infection with specific types of HPV among both HIV-infected and uninfected older men by...

2013-12-02 21:11:52

Physicians have long been taught that a physical examination is not complete without an assessment of whether a patient appears to be acutely or chronically ill. But new research from St. Michael’s Hospital says how sick a patient appears to be may have limited value in diagnosing their actual state of health. “Doctors sometimes assume that they can tell at a glance whether a patient is in poor health, but it’s important for physicians to realize that these impressions may be...


Latest PLoS ONE Reference Libraries

PLoS Medicine
2012-05-17 15:12:48

PLoS Medicine is a peer-reviewed medical journal established in October 2004. It is the second journal of the Public Library of Sciences, which publishes open-access material. All material in PLoS Medicine is published under the Creative Commons license. To fund the journal, the publication’s business model requires that authors pay publication costs. PLoS Medicine provides an innovative and influential venue for research and comment on the major challenges to human health worldwide. It...

PLoS Biology
2012-05-02 19:40:12

PLoS Biology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering all aspects of biology. It was established in 2003, with the first issue published in October of that year. It was the first journal of the Public Library of Science. As of May 2012, the current editor-in-chief is Jonathan Eisen (University of California, Davis). All content in PLoS Biology is published under the Creative Commons “by-attribution” license. The journal is funded by authors who are charged set fees to publish...

PLoS ONE
2012-04-30 14:56:25

PLoS ONE is an open-access peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS). It was established in 2006 as a beta version. In August 2008 it moved from a weekly publication schedule to a daily one, publishing articles as soon as they became ready. In October 2008, it came out of “beta.” In September 2009, PLoS ONE made full online usage of every published article publicly available. The founding managing editor was Chris Surridge. He was succeeded by...

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