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Latest Plumage Stories

Detailing The Evolution Of Plumage Patterns In Male, Female Birds
2013-12-19 14:06:31

Gerard LeBlond for redorbit.com - Your Universe Online Waterfowl such as ducks, geese and swans belong to the order Anseriformes. Game birds such as pheasants, partridges, hens and turkeys are known as the order Galliformes. The birds belonging to both of these orders are recognized not only for their meat, but also for the elegant display of their plumage. Some members within the orders show differences between male and female, known as sexual dimorphism. Such as with the mallard, the...

2013-02-13 14:43:36

Nest diet has big impact on attractiveness of hihi birds Published today by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and University of Cambridge, the study reveals that male hihi birds develop more colorful and attractive breeding feathers if they receive a nest diet rich in carotenoids — natural pigments found mainly in fruit and vegetables. Scientists looked at the effects of newborn nutrition on male plumage in the rare New Zealand hihi (Notiomystis concta) over the course of a...

Elaborate Plumage Due To Testosterone?
2011-10-21 04:24:28

In female barred buttonquails high testosterone levels correlate with elaborate plumage and good body condition In many bird species males have a more elaborate plumage than females. This elaborate plumage is often used to signal body condition, to intimidate rivals or to attract potential mates. In many cases plumage coloration also depends on the hormone testosterone. Christina Muck and Wolfgang Goymann from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen have now investigated...

2011-06-23 15:24:24

Research reveals plumages exhibit less than a third of possible colors birds can see Contrary to our human perception of bird coloration as extraordinarily diverse, a new study reports that bird plumages exhibit only a small fraction (less than a third) of the possible colors birds can observe. Early lineages of living birds probably produced an even smaller range of colors, but the evolution of innovative pigments and structural (or optical) colors has allowed many birds to create more...

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2011-02-08 11:07:58

Up until now it was unknown whether males of the great bustard (Otis tarda), an emblematic bird in Spain and endangered at a global level, transmit information on their weight, size, and age through their plumage. For the first time a study shows that the 'beards' and the design of the neck are "reliable" indicators of the weight and age of their bearers, and are used to both avoid fights with competitors and to attract females. "The heaviest males (best physical condition) make it known to...

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2010-10-25 10:50:00

Flamingos apply natural make-up to their feathers to stand out and attract mates, according to a new study by Juan Amat, from the Estaci³n Biol³gica de Doňana in Seville, Spain, and colleagues. Their research is the first to demonstrate that birds transfer the color pigments (carotenoids) from the secretions of their uropygial gland for cosmetic reasons. The uropygial or preen gland is found in the majority of birds and is situated near the base of the tail....

2010-09-20 10:37:24

Patterned feathers, previously thought to be used only for camouflage in birds, can play an important role in attracting a mate and fending off rivals, a University of Melbourne study reveals. Ms Thanh-Lan Gluckman, co-author of the paper and Masters of Philosophy student from the Department of Zoology at the University of Melbourne, said this finding brought a new perspective to research in animal communication and evolution. "The implication of this study is that feathers don't need to be...

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2010-03-11 07:38:43

A puzzle that has baffled scientists for centuries "“ why some birds appear to be male on one side of the body and female on the other "“ has been solved by researchers. The research, which involved studying rare naturally occurring chickens with white (male) plumage on one side and brown (female) plumage on the other, sheds new light on the sexual development of birds. It was previously thought that sex chromosomes in birds control whether a testis or ovary forms, with sexual...

2009-08-05 09:55:04

Faculty of 1000, the leading scientific evaluation service, has highlighted research providing evidence for the evolution of a new species.Birds use plumage colour to recognize and select potential mates. A mutation of a single DNA base can lead to a striking colour change, as demonstrated by two closely related flycatcher populations in the Solomon Islands. According to a report in the American Naturalist -- selected and reviewed by Faculty of 1000 member Rebecca Kilner (University of...

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2009-08-03 12:30:00

Recent studies have shown that birds sporting brightly colored plumage are more susceptible to being infected with feather-eating bacterium, according to a BBC Earth report. The bacterial infection can harm the birds' health and cause their feathers to become dull. The discovery comes from a study that found 99% of all Eastern bluebirds observed in the state of Virginia to be afflicted with feather-degrading bacteria. Although this kind of bacteria was first found 10 years ago, the latest...


Latest Plumage Reference Libraries

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2005-06-14 09:01:00

The Common Eider (Somateria mollissima) is a large sea duck which is distributed over the northern coasts of Europe, North America and eastern Siberia. It breeds in Arctic and some northern temperate regions, but winters somewhat further south in temperate zones, where it can form large flocks on suitable coastal waters. The nest is built close to the sea and is lined with eiderdown which is plucked from the female's breast. This soft and warm lining was (and in some areas, still is)...

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Word of the Day
pungle
  • To take pains; labor assiduously with little progress.
This word comes from the Spanish 'pongale,' put it.
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