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Latest Polar ice packs Stories

Arctic Sea Ice Extent Hits Record Low
2011-09-11 04:01:00

  The area covered by Arctic sea ice during the summer reached a new all-time low on Thursday, with the summer sea ice extent falling to 1.64 million square miles (4.24 million square kilometers), scientists from a German university reported on Friday. According to AFP reports on Saturday, the current level is approximately one-half a percent below the previous record low, which dates back to the first satellite observations in 1972. Researchers at the University of Bremen's...

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2011-08-26 06:20:31

  A new report from the European Space Agency (ESA) shows that sea ice in the Arctic Ocean has receded dramatically during this summer, opening up two new shipping lanes - the Canadian Northwest Passage and Russia´s Northern Sea Route. The summer of 2007 recorded the lowest amount of sea ice since satellite observations began in 1979. That season was hit with unusual weather; skies opened over the central Arctic Ocean and wind patterns pushed warm air into the region,...

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2011-08-19 07:20:52

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) said Thursday that it would attempt to attach 35 satellite radio-tags to walruses on the northwestern coast of Alaska as part of an ongoing study into how the mammals are responding to reduced Arctic sea ice conditions during late summer and fall. The fast-melting Arctic sea ice seems to be pushing the walruses out onto land, with many moving near the area where oil leases have been sold, the agency said. "Sea ice is an important component in the life...

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2011-08-16 09:55:00

In three decades of recording Arctic Ocean sea ice, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on Monday reported that in July 2011 the sea ice hit its lowest monthly recorded level. Sea ice in the Arctic covered an average 3 million square miles during July, the lowest measurement for that month since the NOAA started keeping such records in 1979. The July 2011 figure is 81,000 square miles smaller than 2007's July record low and about 22 percent below the average for...

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2011-08-12 05:15:00

The melting of Arctic sea ice may temporarily stabilize, and the ice may even expand, over the coming years, according to new research by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). "As we learn more about climate variability, new and unexpected research results are coming to light," said Sarah Ruth, program director in the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences, which funds NCAR. "What's needed now are longer-term observations to better understand the effect of...

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2011-08-11 12:29:40

According to MIT researchers, the most recent global climate report fails to capture the reality of the changing Arctic seascape. The researchers said the most recent global climate report fails to capture trends in Arctic sea-ice thinning and drift, and in some cases substantially underestimates these trends.  The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report estimates that an ice-free Arctic summer by the year 2100. However, Pierre Rampal, a postdoc in...

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2011-08-05 05:35:00

Danish researchers say the rate of melting in the Arctic sea may be slower than previously thought. A team from the Danish National Research Foundation for Geogenetics at the University of Copenhagen developed a method to measure the variations in the ice several millennia back in time. The scientists based their results on material gathered along the coast of northern Greenland, which experts believe will be the final place summer ice will survive. "Our studies show that there have been...

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2011-08-02 08:46:42

An analysis of prehistoric "Heinrich events" that happened many thousands of years ago, creating mass discharges of icebergs into the North Atlantic Ocean, make it clear that very small amounts of subsurface warming of water can trigger a rapid collapse of ice shelves. The findings, to be published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provide historical evidence that warming of water by 3-4 degrees was enough to trigger these huge, episodic discharges of ice from the...

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2011-07-29 10:30:00

A federal scientist under internal investigation, apparently over a study on polar bear deaths that was cited by Al Gore in "An Inconvenient Truth", went on the offensive Thursday, filing a complaint alleging persecution from within the Interior Department, MSNBC is reporting. Charles Monnett, Anchorage-based scientist with the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE), had earlier been questioned by investigators about the study he co-authored and was then...

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2011-07-29 09:35:00

Bt Jill Sakai, University of Wisconsin-Madison During the last prolonged warm spell on Earth, the oceans were at least four meters "“ and possibly as much as 6.5 meters, or about 20 feet "“ higher than they are now. Where did all that extra water come from? Mainly from melting ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica, and many scientists, including University of Wisconsin-Madison geoscience assistant professor Anders Carlson, have expected that Greenland was the main culprit. But...


Latest Polar ice packs Reference Libraries

Arctic Ocean
2013-04-18 22:31:23

The Arctic Ocean which is located in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Arctic north polar region, is the shallowest and smallest of the world’s five major oceanic divisions. The International Hydrographic Organization recognizes it as an ocean, although, some oceanographers consider it as the Arctic Mediterranean Sea or simply, the Arctic Sea, classifying it a Mediterranean sea or an estuary of the Atlantic Ocean. Alternatively, the Arctic Ocean can be considered as the northernmost...

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Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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