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Latest Polar ice packs Stories

9f5160dca6a4f4c8861764d4beb0ff811
2010-06-03 08:40:00

Less ice covers the Arctic today than at any time in recent geologic history. That's the conclusion of an international group of researchers, who have compiled the first comprehensive history of Arctic ice. For decades, scientists have strived to collect sediment cores from the difficult-to-access Arctic Ocean floor, to discover what the Arctic was like in the past. Their most recent goal: to bring a long-term perspective to the ice loss we see today. Now, in an upcoming issue of Quarternary...

a34f7ba3b83304c8d5ebaa6bbe98b5ac1
2010-04-28 13:40:00

Melting sea ice has been shown to be a major cause of warming in the Arctic, according to a University of Melbourne, Australia study. Findings published in Nature today reveal the rapid melting of sea ice has dramatically increased the levels of warming in the region in the last two decades. Lead author Dr James Screen of the School of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne says the increased Arctic warming was due to a positive feedback between sea ice melting and atmospheric...

32e496e1bfcafbfbe56956ef7bf653891
2010-04-28 13:36:49

Scientists have discovered that changes in the amount of ice floating in the polar oceans are causing sea levels to rise. The research, published this week in Geophysical Research Letters, is the first assessment of how quickly floating ice is being lost today. According to Archimedes' principle, any floating object displaces its own weight of fluid. For example, an ice cube in a glass of water does not cause the glass to overflow as it melts. But because sea water is warmer and more salty...

9916b83da1d19fc08e498c29b3937c2b1
2010-04-12 13:29:41

Rate of ice-cap melt has been accelerating since 1985 Close to 50 years of data show the Devon Island ice cap, one of the largest ice masses in the Canadian High Arctic, is thinning and shrinking. A paper published in the March edition of Arctic, the journal of the University of Calgary's Arctic Institute of North America, reports that between 1961 and 1985, the ice cap grew in some years and shrank in others, resulting in an overall loss of mass. But that changed 1985 when scientists began...

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2010-04-08 06:48:59

The U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center reports that the extent of sea ice over the Arctic Ocean grew until the last day of March, which is the latest the annual melting season has begun in 31 years of satellite records. The center said in a statement on Wednesday that cold weather and winds from the north over the Bering Sea and Barents Sea meant the area of ocean covered by ice expanded through last month.  That is two days later than in 1999, the previous latest start to a melting...

1bde702a4b1c7d41202c1673287ddeb21
2010-02-19 07:38:04

In 2007, the Arctic lost a massive amount of thick, multiyear sea ice, contributing to that year's record-low extent of Arctic sea ice. A new NASA-led study has found that the record loss that year was due in part to the absence of "ice arches," naturally-forming, curved ice structures that span the openings between two land points. These arches block sea ice from being pushed by winds or currents through narrow passages and out of the Arctic basin. Beginning each fall, sea ice spreads across...

2010-02-17 09:44:57

The original proposal to build a satellite that would measure ice-thickness change came from Prof. Duncan Wingham in 1998. His role as Lead Investigator for CryoSat has been to maintain the scientific integrity of ESA's ice mission "“ from the drawing board through to a real satellite mission. Duncan Wingham, a British national, is Professor of Climate Physics at University College London (UCL) where he is Head of the Department of Earth Sciences. He was the first Director of the Centre...

1efa7c8b84ff027dc9119bbb665b601b1
2010-02-10 13:11:42

A new University of California, Davis, study by a top ecological forecaster says it is harder than experts thought to predict when sudden shifts in Earth's natural systems will occur -- a worrisome finding for scientists trying to identify the tipping points that could push climate change into an irreparable global disaster. "Many scientists are looking for the warning signs that herald sudden changes in natural systems, in hopes of forestalling those changes, or improving our preparations...

707c3e7ea4e9e38b51e26adf5841a94a1
2009-12-29 11:10:00

There is increased evidence that the Arctic could face seasonally ice-free conditions and much warmer temperatures in the future. Scientists documented evidence that the Arctic Ocean and Nordic Seas were too warm to support summer sea ice during the mid-Pliocene warm period (3.3 to 3 million years ago). This period is characterized by warm temperatures similar to those projected for the end of this century, and is used as an analog to understand future conditions. The U.S. Geological Survey...

b64240573b10fdad4019f91d847156331
2009-12-15 10:30:00

The northern coastline of Alaska midway between Point Barrow and Prudhoe Bay is eroding by up to one-third the length of a football field annually because of a "triple whammy" of declining sea ice, warming seawater and increased wave activity, according to new study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder. The conditions have led to the steady retreat of 30 to 45 feet a year of the 12-foot-high bluffs -- frozen blocks of silt and peat containing 50 to 80 percent ice -- which are toppled...


Latest Polar ice packs Reference Libraries

Arctic Ocean
2013-04-18 22:31:23

The Arctic Ocean which is located in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Arctic north polar region, is the shallowest and smallest of the world’s five major oceanic divisions. The International Hydrographic Organization recognizes it as an ocean, although, some oceanographers consider it as the Arctic Mediterranean Sea or simply, the Arctic Sea, classifying it a Mediterranean sea or an estuary of the Atlantic Ocean. Alternatively, the Arctic Ocean can be considered as the northernmost...

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