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Latest Pollen Stories

2011-01-26 13:29:40

When it comes to pollen formation, seed plants go for overproduction Plants producing flower pollen must not leave anything to chance. The model plant thale cress (Arabidopsis), for instance, uses three signaling pathways in concert with partially overlapping functions. The yield becomes the greatest when all three processes are active; however, two are sufficient to form an acceptable quantity of flower pollen. In a new study, Peter Huijser and his colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for...

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2011-01-22 09:05:33

Pollinators interact with their landscapes to affect the genetic structure of 3 Penstemon species in the Great Basin Do mountain tops act as sky islands for species that live at high elevations? Are plant populations on these mountain tops isolated from one another because the valleys between them act as barriers, or can pollinators act as bridges allowing genes to flow among distant populations? Dr. Andrea Kramer and colleagues from the Chicago Botanic Garden and the University of Illinois...

2011-01-13 08:00:00

SAN ANTONIO, Jan. 13, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- While the rest of the nation battles frigid cold and snow storms, South Texans are dealing with a massive blizzard of pollen. Record-breaking Mountain Cedar pollen counts - the worst since the 90s - are causing even the least symptomatic to suffer. Mountain Cedar, the most prolific pollinating tree in the world, is a drought-tolerant evergreen shrub or small tree, most prevalent in South Central Texas. The pollen can cause a severe allergic...

2010-12-23 18:11:20

Tomato plants use similar biochemical mechanisms to reject pollen from their own flowers as well as pollen from foreign but related plant species, thus guarding against both inbreeding and cross-species hybridization, report plant scientists at the University of California, Davis. The researchers identified a tomato pollen gene that encodes a protein that is very similar to a protein thought to function in preventing self-pollination in petunias. The tomato gene also was shown to play a role...

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2010-12-21 06:00:00

Animals and plants introduced from foreign habitats may not seem harmful and can coexist with native species for decades, according to a European study published Monday. Species that are taken away from their natural predators and placed elsewhere can disrupt native species in their new habitats, and scientists say the problem is already costing Europe $16 billion per year. The study, published in the US Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, which is likely to hold true for other...

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2010-12-14 10:56:27

From southern Africa's pineapple lily to Western Australia's swamp bottlebrush, flowering plants are everywhere.  Also called angiosperms, they make up 90 percent of all land-based, plant life. New research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences provides new insights into their genetic origin, an evolutionary innovation that quickly gave rise to many diverse flowering plants more than 130 million years ago. Moreover, a flower with genetic programming...

2010-11-24 11:32:23

Two proteins involved in powdery mildew infection in plants also play an important role in fertilisation Mildew infections not only cause unsightly vegetable patches, they can also result in extensive crop failure. Interestingly, the processes involved in infections with this garden pest are similar to those involved in fertilisation. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne and the University of Zurich have identified two proteins in the model plant...

2010-11-16 19:15:44

First study to show that elephant-shrews consume the nectar and pollinate the Pagoda lily Long-nosed Cape rock elephant-shrews are fond of sticky treats, according to Dr. Petra Wester from the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa. Her investigations show for the first time that the elephant-shrew, Elephantulus edwardii, licks the nectar of the flowers and pollinates the Pagoda lily. Her results are published in Springer's journal, Naturwissenschaften "“ The Science of Nature. Dr....

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2010-11-05 10:23:16

A research team led by Teh-hui Kao, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State University, in collaboration with a team lead by Professor Seiji Takayama at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology in Japan, has discovered a large suite of genes in the petunia plant that acts to prevent it from breeding with itself or with its close relatives, and to promote breeding with unrelated individuals. In much the same way that human inbreeding sometimes results in genetic...

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2010-10-20 13:10:00

A new study published on Wednesday found that a child's risk of allergies could be linked to the season that coincides with the first three months of pregnancy. Researchers cast an eye over the health records of 5,920 children born between 2001 and 2006 in the southern Finnish province of South Karelia, 961 of whom were given skin tests for allergies by the age of four. Ten percent of those who were born in October and November tested positive, twice the proportion of those born in June and...


Latest Pollen Reference Libraries

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2005-06-08 20:47:33

Iris is a genus of flowering plants with showy flowers ranging in color from gold, copper-red or yellow to white, blue, blue-violet, lavender, tan, maroon and purple. Pink and apricot colored irises have also been bred in some species. The name "Iris" can be applied to the genus or to any of the species within it. It is also applied to various subdivisions within the genus. Description There are many species of iris widely distributed throughout the northern temperate zone. Their...

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Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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