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Latest Pollinators Stories

Expect To See Fewer Monarch Butterflies This Spring
2013-03-14 18:12:32

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Every year, hoards of Monarch butterflies begin their epic journey from Mexico through the hills of Texas to all points north, sometimes as far as Canada. Unfortunately, there will be fewer butterflies to take this journey during the coming months. It´s a trend that has been ongoing for about seven years or more and, according to Omar Vidal with the Mexican branch of the World Wildlife Fund, high temperatures and expanding...

Social Bees Use Chemical Signals To Mark Dangerous Flowers
2013-03-14 13:32:43

FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology Scientists already knew that some social bee species warn their conspecifics when detecting the presence of a predator near their hive, which in turn causes an attack response to the possible predator. Researchers at the University of Tours (France) in collaboration with the Experimental Station of Arid Zones of Almeria (Spain) have now demonstrated that they also use chemical signals to mark those flowers where they have previously...

Butterfly Evolution Can Also Be Driven By Spiders
2013-03-13 05:09:24

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Butterflies are vibrant and colorful insects, with colorations designed to deflect predators. A new study from the University of Florida reveals that some of these predator driven defenses may be caused by enemies one-tenth the size of the butterfly. Since Darwin sailed on the Beagle over 150 years ago, scientists have theorized that the main influence on the evolution of coloration in butterflies came from large predators such as...

Bats Undisturbed By Forest Fires
2013-03-08 09:07:56

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Forest fires are responsible for laying waste to entire ecosystems. As the flames rush through, animals attempt to make their escape, seeking shelter in less incendiary locales. Charred remains of trees and ground cover are completely unsuitable for sustaining the life of the animals that once called the area home. However, a new study led by bat ecologist Winifred Frick of the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) reports the...

2013-02-26 10:42:38

New research delivers a sting in the tail for queen wasps. Scientists have sequenced the active parts of the genome — or transcriptome — of primitively eusocial wasps to identify the part of the genome that makes you a queen or a worker. Their work, published in BioMed Central's open access journal Genome Biology, shows that workers have a more active transcriptome than queens. This suggests that in these simple societies, workers may be the 'jack-of-all-trades' in the colony -...

The Mysteries Of Hummingbird Flight
2013-02-26 05:40:07

[ Watch the Video: Hummingbird Hovering ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The wings of the hummingbird move so fast — about 80 beats per second — these amazing creatures can actually fly right, left, up, down, backwards and even upside down. Until now, scientists believed the bird's remarkable flight generated a single trail of vortices in its wake that helps the bird hover. A research team, led by the University of California, Riverside, conducted...

Electric Flowers Help Bees Pick Up Pollen
2013-02-22 11:25:13

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Previous research has shown that bees build up an electrical charge as they buzz through the air, but a new study from the University of Bristol in the U.K. has shown that the bees are able to use this charge to interact with nectar-bearing flowers. According to a summary of the study recently published in the journal Science, the British scientists showed that flowers actually modify their own electrical fields to attract the flying...

Fruit Flies Force Their Young To Get Liquored-up For Their Own Good
2013-02-22 10:59:06

Emory University When fruit flies sense parasitic wasps in their environment, they lay their eggs in an alcohol-soaked environment, essentially forcing their larvae to consume booze as a drug to combat the deadly wasps. The discovery by biologists at Emory University is being published in the journal Science on Friday, February 22. “The adult flies actually anticipate an infection risk to their children, and then they medicate them by depositing them in alcohol,” says...

Monarch Butterflies Won't Migrate North Unless They Can Chill Out First In Mexico
2013-02-22 10:09:45

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Millions of monarch butterflies from across the eastern U.S. begin a southward migration each fall to escape the frigid temperatures of the northern boundary of their range. They travel up to 2,000 miles to reach an overwintering site in a very specific grove of fir trees in central Mexico. A new study from the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMass) suggests the butterflies require the exposure to coldness in the...

New Moth Perfumes Generated Through Genetic Mutations
2013-02-20 11:05:21

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study led by scientists at Sweden´s Lund University has revealed that a single mutation in a moth gene can produce an entirely new scent. The research team believes the results could contribute to the tailored production of pheromones that could be used for pest control. The scent of a female moth can be picked up by the male from several hundred feet away.  The males are guided by sexual pheromones —...


Latest Pollinators Reference Libraries

Melissophobia
2013-12-24 11:13:46

Melissophobia or the fear of bees, from Greek melissa, meaning honey bee and phobos, meaning fear, and sometimes misspelled as melissaphobia and known also as apiphobia, is one of the most common fears among people and is kind of a specific phobia. The majority of the population have been stung by a bee or had friends or family members stung. A child may fall victim to a bee sting while playing outside. The sting can be rather painful and in some individuals results in swelling which might...

Brandt’s Bat, Myitus brandtii
2013-10-11 08:07:41

The Brandt’s bat has a large population in northwest of England but is endangered in Austria. The Brandt’s Bat has shaggy brown fur with a pale grey belly. This bat is not a large bat and weighs less than half an ounce and measures up to two inches long. Its wingspan is more than triple its body length at 7.5 to 9.5 inches. Brandt’s bat eats only insects (insectivorous) and is not blind. However, echolocation is used for “night-vision,” so that while hunting at night it does...

Lesser Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae
2013-08-19 15:45:14

The lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat or more commonly as Sanborn’s long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in a different areas depending upon the season. Its summer range includes southern portions of Arizona, California, and New Mexico and a yearly range in southern and eastern portions of Mexico and coasts of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.  This species prefers a habitat within scrublands,...

Greater Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris nivalis
2013-08-19 15:40:45

The greater long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris nivalis), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in Mexico, Guatemala, and the United States. It prefers a habitat within temperate forests or desert scrublands. The greater long-nosed bat migrates seasonally to different areas of is range, most likely due to weather patterns and food abundance. In Mexico, the greater long-nosed bat roosts in male and female colonies, but during midsummer, after...

Southern Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris curasoae
2013-08-19 15:20:27

The southern long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae) is a species of leaf-nosed bat that is native to South America. It holds a range that includes Venezuela, Colombia, and the islands of Curaçao, Aruba, and Bonaire. It prefers a habitat within arid or semiarid climates along coastlines or in scrublands and thorn forests. The Curacao population was once thought to be a subspecies but is now classified as a population along with other populations of the species. The southern long-nosed bat...

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Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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