Quantcast

Latest Pollinators Stories

Radio Frequency ID Tags Attached To Honey Bees Reveal Hive Dynamics
2014-07-25 03:12:10

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Scientists attached radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags to hundreds of individual honey bees and tracked them for several weeks. The effort yielded two discoveries: Some foraging bees are much busier than others; and if those busy bees disappear, others will take their place. The findings are reported in the journal Animal Behaviour. [ Watch The Video: Hive Intelligence: How Honey Bees Adjust To Catastrophic Loss ] Tagging the...

Greater mouse-eared bat
2014-07-24 05:09:35

Rayshell Clapper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The manner in which bats use echolocation has long been of interest to scientists, but new research shows that bats use more than echolocation to get around. In fact, the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) recently announced a new discovery about the greater mouse-eared bat and how it navigates. The greater mouse-eared bat uses “polarization patterns in the sky to navigate…The bats use the way the Sun's light is...

honey bee diet
2014-07-21 04:55:19

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online In a new study designed to determine whether or not poor nutrition plays a role in colony collapse disorder, researchers from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign have discovered that there are significant differences in the genetic activity in honey bees based on the type of food the insects consume. The research, which was published online in the journal Scientific Reports, specifically focused on an energy storage...

Bees Tongue Size Matters For A Good Relationship With Flowers
2014-07-17 03:12:23

Ecological Society of America For bees and the flowers they pollinate, a compatible tongue length is essential to a successful relationship. Some bees and plants are very closely matched, with bee tongue sized to the flower depth. Other bee species are generalists, flitting among flower species to drink nectar and collect pollen from a diverse variety of plants. Data on tongue lengths can help ecologists understand and predict the behavior, resilience and invasiveness of bee populations....

Pesticide Use Is Impairing Bees' Abilities To Forage For Pollen
2014-07-10 07:26:46

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Bees with long-term exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides exhibit a decreased ability to forage for pollen, according to a new study led by the University of Guelph. The study, which involved fitting bees with tiny radio frequency transmitters, was published in a recent issue of Functional Ecology. The researchers — Nigel Raine, a professor in Guelph’s School of Environmental Sciences, and Richard Gill of Imperial College London...

Studying Bees From The Inside Out
2014-07-08 03:18:52

National Science Foundation Researchers work to save bees by studying the diversity of microbes that live in their guts and the impacts on these microbes of exposure to antibiotics It is 1,825 miles from New Haven, Conn., to Austin, Tex., which typically means 30 hours of driving and three nights in motels, not an easy trip for anyone. But for researchers moving from Yale University to a new lab at the University of Texas last August, it proved especially challenging. They made the...

Bees 'Shouts' Warn Intruders That A Food Source Will Be Defended
2014-07-08 08:15:09

[ Watch the Video: Stingless Bees Fight Over Food Source ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online If you were foraging for food in a highly competitive environment and you found a very lucrative source, how would you communicate this prize to your teammates without giving it away to your competitors? This is the situation bees find themselves in quite often. Scientists believe that many animals, faced with eavesdroppers, have developed "whispers" to prevent revealing...

2014-07-03 10:08:00

PLOS New species of spider wasp may use chemical signals from dead ants to protect nest A new species of spider wasp, the 'Bone-house Wasp,' may use chemical cues from dead ants as a nest protection strategy, according to a recent study published July 2, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Michael Staab from University of Freiburg, Germany, and his colleagues from China and Germany. Wasps use a wide variety of nest protection strategies, including digging holes or occupying...

Bumblebee Queens Travel Far And Away Before Starting New Homes
2014-07-01 13:15:09

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study published in the journal Molecular Ecology found that queen bumblebees fly long distances to establish new colonies. The study was based on observations of five different species, including four common and one rare species, in nearly 7.7 square miles of farmland in southern England. The researchers found that queens nesting near one another were barely related or completely unrelated for all five species. The study team...

Monarch Butterflies Rely In Part On Magnetic Compass For Navigation
2014-06-25 07:52:07

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Mass migrations have puzzled scientists for decades, and perhaps none more so than the North American monarch butterfly. Each fall, millions of the beautiful orange and black winged insects begin their journey from the eastern US and Canada. They travel over 2,000 miles to winter in specific groves of fir trees in the Michoacan Mountains in central Mexico, where they crowd together so densely that the air is filled with butterflies,...


Latest Pollinators Reference Libraries

Melissophobia
2013-12-24 11:13:46

Melissophobia or the fear of bees, from Greek melissa, meaning honey bee and phobos, meaning fear, and sometimes misspelled as melissaphobia and known also as apiphobia, is one of the most common fears among people and is kind of a specific phobia. The majority of the population have been stung by a bee or had friends or family members stung. A child may fall victim to a bee sting while playing outside. The sting can be rather painful and in some individuals results in swelling which might...

Brandt’s Bat, Myitus brandtii
2013-10-11 08:07:41

The Brandt’s bat has a large population in northwest of England but is endangered in Austria. The Brandt’s Bat has shaggy brown fur with a pale grey belly. This bat is not a large bat and weighs less than half an ounce and measures up to two inches long. Its wingspan is more than triple its body length at 7.5 to 9.5 inches. Brandt’s bat eats only insects (insectivorous) and is not blind. However, echolocation is used for “night-vision,” so that while hunting at night it does...

Lesser Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae
2013-08-19 15:45:14

The lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat or more commonly as Sanborn’s long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in a different areas depending upon the season. Its summer range includes southern portions of Arizona, California, and New Mexico and a yearly range in southern and eastern portions of Mexico and coasts of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.  This species prefers a habitat within scrublands,...

Greater Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris nivalis
2013-08-19 15:40:45

The greater long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris nivalis), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in Mexico, Guatemala, and the United States. It prefers a habitat within temperate forests or desert scrublands. The greater long-nosed bat migrates seasonally to different areas of is range, most likely due to weather patterns and food abundance. In Mexico, the greater long-nosed bat roosts in male and female colonies, but during midsummer, after...

Southern Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris curasoae
2013-08-19 15:20:27

The southern long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae) is a species of leaf-nosed bat that is native to South America. It holds a range that includes Venezuela, Colombia, and the islands of Curaçao, Aruba, and Bonaire. It prefers a habitat within arid or semiarid climates along coastlines or in scrublands and thorn forests. The Curacao population was once thought to be a subspecies but is now classified as a population along with other populations of the species. The southern long-nosed bat...

More Articles (49 articles) »
Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.