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Latest Pollinators Stories

Butterflies And Bats Aid In Research About Infectious Diseases
2012-06-11 12:08:09

[ Watch the Video ] Human activity, habitat disruption may affect migration patterns and spread of infectious diseases There's a most unusual gym in ecologist Sonia Altizer's lab at the University of Georgia in Athens. The athletes are monarch butterflies, and their workouts are carefully monitored to determine how parasites impact their flight performance. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Altizer and her team study how animal behavior, including long distance...

2012-06-10 23:02:30

Bee products such as Royal Jelly, Propolis Bee Pollen and Manuka Honey have been used therapeutically since ancient times and are frequently recommended by Chinese and alternative medicine practitioners. As Westerners swing toward natural therapies and lifestyles, Australian bee product specialist Natural Life is finding a new niche market for bee health products. Sydney, Australia (PRWEB) June 09, 2012 As the worldwide trend towards natural therapies continues, Australian bee product...

Male Virgin Moths Think They're Hot When They're Not
2012-06-07 09:12:58

Female sex odor makes cool males take flight too soon Talk about throwing yourself into a relationship too soon. A University of Utah study found that when a virgin male moth gets a whiff of female sex attractant, he's quicker to start shivering to warm up his flight muscles, and then takes off prematurely when he's still too cool for powerful flight. So his headlong rush to reach the female first may cost him the race. The study illustrates the tradeoff between being quick to start...

2012-06-06 10:21:22

New York and Washington, DC Events Highlight Research Methodology on Amphibian Declines Implemented to Study Honey Bees NEW YORK, June 6, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- EcoHealth Alliance, a nonprofit organization that focuses on local conservation and global health issues, announced this week at New York City and Washington, DC events the expansion of its programs to include the study of honey bee health. Leveraging the organization's independent scientific expertise, EcoHealth...

hummingbirds1_h
2012-06-03 07:39:12

The glacier lily as it's called, is a tall, willowy plant that graces mountain meadows throughout western North America. It flowers early in spring, when the first bumblebees and hummingbirds appear. Or did. The lily, a plant that grows best on subalpine slopes, is fast becoming a hothouse flower. In Earth's warming temperatures, its first blooms appear some 17 days earlier than they did in the 1970s, scientists David Inouye and Amy McKinney of the University of Maryland and colleagues...

140453684
2012-06-02 11:47:09

During the fall, hundreds of millions of monarch butterflies living in eastern North America fly up to 1,500 miles to the volcanic forests of Mexico to spend the winter, while monarchs west of the Rocky Mountains fly to the California coast. The phenomenon is both spectacular and mysterious: How do the insects learn these particular routes and why do they stick to them? A prevailing theory contends that eastern and western monarchs are genetically distinct, and that genetic...

Journey Of Little Brown Bats Tracked By Chemical 'Fingerprinting'
2012-05-31 03:41:52

Little brown bats are tiny creatures that fly through the night hunting insects that humans consider pests, zooming past trees in a wave of sleek brown fur. The 3.4 inch long bats, when not hunting insects in warmer months, hibernate in abandoned mines and caves during the winter. As peaceful as this image seems, a disease known as white-nose syndrome jeopardizes the little brown bat´s very survival.  A groundbreaking method of tracking the little brown bat by using stable...

Hawkmoths Can Actually See Humidity
2012-05-30 11:26:55

Brett Smith for RedOrbit.com Instead of using visual cues or floral scents, some moths detect increases in humidity around flowers to see if it is worth further inspection, new research led by a University of Arizona entomologist has found. According to the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Martin von Arx of the University of Arizona has discovered a previously unknown sensory channel that is used in plant-animal interactions. "As creatures who...

What Makes Flowers More Attractive To Bees?
2012-05-29 05:44:38

As gardeners get busy filling tubs and borders with colorful bedding plants, scientists at the Universities of Cambridge and Bristol have discovered more about what makes flowers attractive to bees rather than humans. Published today in the British Ecological Society's journal Functional Ecology, their research reveals that Velcro-like cells on plant petals play a crucial role in helping bees grip flowers — especially when the wind gets up. The study focuses on special cells found on...

The Bees Are Back In Town
2012-05-28 11:56:27

Have you heard the latest buzz? A species of bumblebee once thought to be extinct is now being reintroduced to the UK countryside. According to a report from the BBC, the short-haired bumblebee, or Bombus subterraneus to those in the know, once thrived in the UK just south of England before vanishing in 1988. Recently, a healthy colony of the bumblebee was found in Sweden, allowing conservationists to seed a new colony in their original homestead. Now, about 50 queen short-haired...


Latest Pollinators Reference Libraries

Melissophobia
2013-12-24 11:13:46

Melissophobia or the fear of bees, from Greek melissa, meaning honey bee and phobos, meaning fear, and sometimes misspelled as melissaphobia and known also as apiphobia, is one of the most common fears among people and is kind of a specific phobia. The majority of the population have been stung by a bee or had friends or family members stung. A child may fall victim to a bee sting while playing outside. The sting can be rather painful and in some individuals results in swelling which might...

Brandt’s Bat, Myitus brandtii
2013-10-11 08:07:41

The Brandt’s bat has a large population in northwest of England but is endangered in Austria. The Brandt’s Bat has shaggy brown fur with a pale grey belly. This bat is not a large bat and weighs less than half an ounce and measures up to two inches long. Its wingspan is more than triple its body length at 7.5 to 9.5 inches. Brandt’s bat eats only insects (insectivorous) and is not blind. However, echolocation is used for “night-vision,” so that while hunting at night it does...

Lesser Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae
2013-08-19 15:45:14

The lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat or more commonly as Sanborn’s long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in a different areas depending upon the season. Its summer range includes southern portions of Arizona, California, and New Mexico and a yearly range in southern and eastern portions of Mexico and coasts of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.  This species prefers a habitat within scrublands,...

Greater Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris nivalis
2013-08-19 15:40:45

The greater long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris nivalis), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in Mexico, Guatemala, and the United States. It prefers a habitat within temperate forests or desert scrublands. The greater long-nosed bat migrates seasonally to different areas of is range, most likely due to weather patterns and food abundance. In Mexico, the greater long-nosed bat roosts in male and female colonies, but during midsummer, after...

Southern Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris curasoae
2013-08-19 15:20:27

The southern long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae) is a species of leaf-nosed bat that is native to South America. It holds a range that includes Venezuela, Colombia, and the islands of Curaçao, Aruba, and Bonaire. It prefers a habitat within arid or semiarid climates along coastlines or in scrublands and thorn forests. The Curacao population was once thought to be a subspecies but is now classified as a population along with other populations of the species. The southern long-nosed bat...

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