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Latest Pollinators Stories

bee biodiversity
2014-05-12 09:14:56

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Farmers rely on bees to pollinate their crops and increase yields, and a new study from entomologists at North Carolina State University has found the biodiversity of bees in a local ecosystem can have a significant impact on crop yield. In the report, which was published in the journal PLOS ONE, the researchers showed that blueberry plants produce more seed and grow larger berries if they receive a more diverse range of bee species....

2014-05-08 23:02:05

Rising spring temperatures prompt many bee species to begin their search for the flowering plants they depend on for food — and which they propagate through pollination. But what would happen if this vital, mutually beneficial relationship goes out of synch due to climate change? Newark, NJ (PRWEB) May 08, 2014 The timing has been beautifully choreographed by nature. Rising spring temperatures prompt many bee species to begin their search for the flowering plants they depend on for food...

2014-05-06 23:16:42

A bold blend of honey that reminds us of the strength and character of our American pioneers. Bethesda, MD (PRWEB) May 06, 2014 Bethesda-based Bee America introduced three new honey blends earlier this year. These blends are based on original honey that sustained Americans as they explored and settled in the United States. Pioneer Honey is the second honey blend in this series. Pioneer Honey is characterized by its robust taste and sweetness. This honey is reminiscent of the tended straw...

2014-05-05 08:23:01

Celebrate the Annual Return of the Rufous Hummingbird and Help Them Survive the Harsh Spring SANTA BARBARA, Calif., May 5, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Rufous Hummingbird populations have dropped 60% since 1967. Unusual weather this year has encouraged some hummingbirds to migrate earlier than past years and they're arriving exhausted and hungry. What can be done right now to help them? Pollinator Queen, Noelle Meade-Izzi shares 5 tips on her website explaining how to attract and support...

Thirsty Butterflies And Bees Like Crocodile Tears
2014-05-01 03:54:03

Ecological Society of America The butterfly (Dryas iulia) and the bee (Centris sp.) were most likely seeking scarce minerals and an extra boost of protein. On a beautiful December day in 2013, they found the precious nutrients in the tears of a spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus), relaxing on the banks of the Río Puerto Viejo in northeastern Costa Rica. A boat carrying students, photographers, and aquatic ecologist Carlos de la Rosa was passing slowing and quietly by, and caught the...

Study Shows Bumblebees Join Other Bees Already Safely Feeding On Flowers
2014-04-30 03:16:03

Queen Mary, University of London Bumblebees can distinguish between safe and dangerous environments, and are attracted to land on flowers popular with other bees when exposed to perilous situations, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London. The study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, shows that past experience of predation causes bumblebees to join other bees already safely feeding on flowers. Co-author and PhD student Erika Dawson...

Butterfly Emergence Patterns Influenced By Urbanization, Higher Temperatures
2014-04-28 03:12:46

North Carolina State University An international team of researchers has found that a subset of common butterfly species are emerging later than usual in urban areas located in warmer regions, raising questions about how the insects respond to significant increases in temperature. “We know that butterflies emerge earlier in North Carolina than they do in New England, because it’s warmer,” says Tyson Wepprich, a Ph.D. student at NC State and co-author of a paper describing the...

2014-04-25 16:24:49

North American Bayer Bee Care Center Seeks to Educate Youth about Bee Health through its First Coloring Contest RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C., April 25, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- In celebration of the opening of Bayer's North American Bee Care Center, the company is launching Color Me Bee-autifully, a coloring contest and learning activity for children 12 years and under. The coloring contest will allow youth to learn about the many beneficial aspects of honey bees in pollinating fruits...

2014-04-14 23:08:16

Danville Science Center celebrates its annual Butterfly Hello and Thyme on April 19 with an herb fair, hands-on activities and butterfly releases. Danville, Virginia (PRWEB) April 14, 2014 Danville Science Center celebrates its annual Butterfly Hello and Thyme on Saturday, April 19. Early birds can dig into gardening at the Herb Fair from 9 am – Noon. Experts on site will cultivate guests’ knowledge to strengthen the green thumb of novice gardeners and experienced horticulturalists...

fruit fly Drosophila hydei
2014-04-11 06:24:03

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online If you’ve ever wondered why it can be so gosh-darned hard to swat a buzzing fly, you’re not alone – researchers from the University of Washington used an array of high-speed video cameras in an attempt to solve the mystery. Thanks to equipment capable of operating at 7,500 frames per second, postdoctoral researcher Florian Muijres and his colleagues captured the wing and body motion of the insects after they were presented...


Latest Pollinators Reference Libraries

Melissophobia
2013-12-24 11:13:46

Melissophobia or the fear of bees, from Greek melissa, meaning honey bee and phobos, meaning fear, and sometimes misspelled as melissaphobia and known also as apiphobia, is one of the most common fears among people and is kind of a specific phobia. The majority of the population have been stung by a bee or had friends or family members stung. A child may fall victim to a bee sting while playing outside. The sting can be rather painful and in some individuals results in swelling which might...

Brandt’s Bat, Myitus brandtii
2013-10-11 08:07:41

The Brandt’s bat has a large population in northwest of England but is endangered in Austria. The Brandt’s Bat has shaggy brown fur with a pale grey belly. This bat is not a large bat and weighs less than half an ounce and measures up to two inches long. Its wingspan is more than triple its body length at 7.5 to 9.5 inches. Brandt’s bat eats only insects (insectivorous) and is not blind. However, echolocation is used for “night-vision,” so that while hunting at night it does...

Lesser Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae
2013-08-19 15:45:14

The lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat or more commonly as Sanborn’s long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in a different areas depending upon the season. Its summer range includes southern portions of Arizona, California, and New Mexico and a yearly range in southern and eastern portions of Mexico and coasts of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.  This species prefers a habitat within scrublands,...

Greater Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris nivalis
2013-08-19 15:40:45

The greater long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris nivalis), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in Mexico, Guatemala, and the United States. It prefers a habitat within temperate forests or desert scrublands. The greater long-nosed bat migrates seasonally to different areas of is range, most likely due to weather patterns and food abundance. In Mexico, the greater long-nosed bat roosts in male and female colonies, but during midsummer, after...

Southern Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris curasoae
2013-08-19 15:20:27

The southern long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae) is a species of leaf-nosed bat that is native to South America. It holds a range that includes Venezuela, Colombia, and the islands of Curaçao, Aruba, and Bonaire. It prefers a habitat within arid or semiarid climates along coastlines or in scrublands and thorn forests. The Curacao population was once thought to be a subspecies but is now classified as a population along with other populations of the species. The southern long-nosed bat...

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Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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