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Latest Pollinators Stories

Researchers Discover Molecular Causes For Sex Determination In Honey Bees
2013-12-31 06:56:40

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online New research appearing in the December issue of the journal Cell Biology puts together the final pieces in a puzzle 200 years in the making – determining the molecular evolution in the genes that separate male honey bees from female ones. Lead author Martin Beye, a professor with the Institute of Evolutionary Genetics at the University of Düsseldorf, and his colleagues studied 14 natural sequence variants of the complementary...

2013-12-12 16:25:44

CARPINTERIA, Calif., Dec. 12, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- For almost 30 years, California-based and family-owned and operated Pacific Resources International (PRI) is the pioneer and exclusive importer of high quality, premium, raw Manuka honey and unique products sourced directly from New Zealand. David Noll, founder and CEO of PRI, lived and worked in New Zealand for over 15 years before deciding to move back to the US and bring with him New Zealand's Manuka honey and products such as...

2013-12-11 13:12:46

We know more about wildlife this week, thanks to research by two Canadian teens. Teens from Ottawa and rural British Columbia published their research in this week’s issue of a scientific journal, The Canadian Field-Naturalist. Their research on wasps and leaf disease reveal that a Canadian wasp is an efficient killer of an agricultural pest, and a little-known fungus is hurting Highbush Cranberries. Both research articles were subject to the same peer-review process and met the same...

Researchers Propose Guidelines To Assess How Effective Species Are At Pollinating Crops
2013-12-10 07:00:11

North Carolina State University From tomatoes to pumpkins, most fruit and vegetable crops rely on pollination by bees and other insect species – and the future of many of those species is uncertain. Now researchers from North Carolina State University are proposing a set of guidelines for assessing the performance of pollinator species in order to determine which species are most important and should be prioritized for protection. “Widespread concerns over the fate of honey bees and...

Peaceful Bumblebee Invades South America
2013-12-09 10:12:21

ETH Zurich Bumblebees look cute. They have a thick fur, fly somewhat clumsily and are less aggressive than honeybees or wasps. They are very much appreciated by farmers as keen pollen collectors. Particularly in the context of the crisis-stricken honeybee populations, the buff-tailed bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, is being bred on an industrial scale for the pollination of fruit and vegetable crops both inside and outside greenhouses. It was hoped that these insects would take over these...

Fossil Evidence Indicates Fig Wasps Were Here Long Before Fig Trees
2013-12-06 07:57:54

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers are puzzled by a 115-million-year-old fossilized wasp from northeast Brazil. The puzzle rests in the wasp's ovipositor, the organ through which it lays its eggs. The fossilized wasp's ovipositor looks a lot like those of present-day wasps that lay their eggs in figs. The researchers say that the problem is that figs arose around 65 million years after this wasp was alive. The wasp belongs to the Hymenoptera superfamily...

Fossils Clarify Origins Of Wasps And Their Kin
2013-12-04 19:00:47

Pensoft Publishers Wasps, bees, ants and relatives comprise the megadiverse insect order Hymenoptera, the third most speciose animal group on Earth, far surpassing the number of known vertebrate species. All the four most diverse orders of animals (beetles, butterflies, wasps, and true flies) belong to the group of insects with complete metamorphosis, i.e. having a dormant pupa, jointly known as Holometabola. Other holometabolans are lacewings, alderflies, dobsonflies, snakeflies,...

Smaller Islands Have Shorter Food Chains
2013-11-22 09:07:08

University of Helsinki That smaller islands will typically sustain fewer species than large ones is a widespread pattern in nature. Now a team of researchers shows that smaller area will mean not only fewer species, but also shorter food chains. This implies that plant and animal communities on small islands may work differently from those on large ones. Top predators the first to go Working across a set of 20 islands off the Finnish coast, a group of Finnish scientists found that a...

2013-11-21 14:18:01

The flight season timing of a wide variety of butterflies is responsive to temperature and could be altered by climate change, according to a UBC study that leverages more than a century’s worth of museum and weather records. Researchers from UBC, the Université de Sherbrooke and the University of Ottawa combed through Canadian museum collections of more than 200 species of butterflies and matched them with weather station data going back 130 years. They found butterflies possess a...

Hardworking Sisters Allow Insect Colonies To Thrive
2013-11-21 14:09:25

University of Edinburgh They are among the animal kingdom's most industrious workers … now a study reveals why colonies of ants and bees depend on females for their success. Altruistic workers in social insect colonies – such as ants, bees and wasps – are more likely to be female, because their maternal instincts make them better at caring for the queen's offspring. The findings come from a study of who does what in these highly organized insect societies. In these species, it...


Latest Pollinators Reference Libraries

Melissophobia
2013-12-24 11:13:46

Melissophobia or the fear of bees, from Greek melissa, meaning honey bee and phobos, meaning fear, and sometimes misspelled as melissaphobia and known also as apiphobia, is one of the most common fears among people and is kind of a specific phobia. The majority of the population have been stung by a bee or had friends or family members stung. A child may fall victim to a bee sting while playing outside. The sting can be rather painful and in some individuals results in swelling which might...

Brandt’s Bat, Myitus brandtii
2013-10-11 08:07:41

The Brandt’s bat has a large population in northwest of England but is endangered in Austria. The Brandt’s Bat has shaggy brown fur with a pale grey belly. This bat is not a large bat and weighs less than half an ounce and measures up to two inches long. Its wingspan is more than triple its body length at 7.5 to 9.5 inches. Brandt’s bat eats only insects (insectivorous) and is not blind. However, echolocation is used for “night-vision,” so that while hunting at night it does...

Lesser Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae
2013-08-19 15:45:14

The lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat or more commonly as Sanborn’s long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in a different areas depending upon the season. Its summer range includes southern portions of Arizona, California, and New Mexico and a yearly range in southern and eastern portions of Mexico and coasts of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.  This species prefers a habitat within scrublands,...

Greater Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris nivalis
2013-08-19 15:40:45

The greater long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris nivalis), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in Mexico, Guatemala, and the United States. It prefers a habitat within temperate forests or desert scrublands. The greater long-nosed bat migrates seasonally to different areas of is range, most likely due to weather patterns and food abundance. In Mexico, the greater long-nosed bat roosts in male and female colonies, but during midsummer, after...

Southern Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris curasoae
2013-08-19 15:20:27

The southern long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae) is a species of leaf-nosed bat that is native to South America. It holds a range that includes Venezuela, Colombia, and the islands of Curaçao, Aruba, and Bonaire. It prefers a habitat within arid or semiarid climates along coastlines or in scrublands and thorn forests. The Curacao population was once thought to be a subspecies but is now classified as a population along with other populations of the species. The southern long-nosed bat...

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