Quantcast

Latest Pollinators Stories

A Single Gene Controls Wing Mimicry In Butterflies
2014-03-05 14:04:36

University of Chicago A single gene regulates the complex wing patterns, colors and structures required for mimicry in swallowtail butterflies, report scientists from the University of Chicago, March 5 in Nature. Surprisingly, the gene described, doublesex, is already well-known for its critical role in sexual differentiation in insects. "Conventional wisdom says that it should be multiple genes working together to control the whole wing pattern of a butterfly," said Marcus Kronforst,...

2014-03-03 23:25:07

12,000 Exotic Butterflies, 100 species on display from March 1, 2014 - April 6, 2014 Fort Worth, Texas (PRWEB) March 03, 2014 The Fort Worth Botanic Garden, the Botanical Research Institute of Texas (BRIT®), the Fort Worth Garden Club, the Fort Worth Botanical Society, and Cirro Energy are pleased to announce the opening of “Butterflies in the Garden,” the largest exhibit of live, exotic butterflies in north central Texas in the conservatory of the Fort Worth Botanic Garden, 3220...

2014-02-27 16:27:51

Bayer travels to San Antonio for its fourth tour stop to continue promoting bee health across the country at top agriculture universities and events SAN ANTONIO, Feb. 27, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- In an effort to further education and collaboration around pollinator health, Bayer CropScience will continue its second annual Bee Care Tour with a stop in San Antonio, Texas at Commodity Classic from Feb. 27 - March 1. The mobile tour is traveling coast-to-coast to create awareness of the vital role...

Apanteles albanjimenezi
2014-02-25 07:59:21

Pensoft Publishers An inventory of wild-caught caterpillars, its food plants and parasitoids, has been going on for more than 34 years in Area de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG), a protected area of approximately 1200 km2 in northwestern Costa Rica. As a result, more than 10,000 species of moths and butterflies are estimated to live in ACG. Their caterpillars are in turn attacked by many parasitoid wasps, also numbering thousands of species. However, most of those wasps have never been...

2014-02-24 23:04:07

Horne’s Pest Control Company offers tips on dealing with bats as they come back from hibernating all winter. Martinez, GA (PRWEB) February 24, 2014 The weather is getting warmer, which also means that bats are slowly starting to awaken and migrate back to their spring and summer habitat after hibernating all winter long. With the start of the spring season, Horne’s Pest Control recommends that people protect the bats around their home, rather than trying to kill them. Most people know...

Kamehameha butterfly
2014-02-24 09:59:12

[ Watch the Video: Saving the Kamehameha Butterfly ] University of Hawaii at Manoa The Kamehameha butterfly is the state insect of Hawaii and one of two butterflies native to the 50th state. It’s a little smaller than a monarch butterfly. “They’re basically an orange, a kind of deep orange, sometimes almost a rosy, a pinkish hue and they have these white spots on them,” said Will Haines, a University of Hawaii at Manoa researcher from the Department of Plant and Environmental...

2014-02-19 23:25:51

American Heritage Collection Features 18th and 19th Century America Inspired Blends of Honey Bethesda, MD (PRWEB) February 19, 2014 Bethesda-based Bee America introduces three new honey blends based on original honey that sustained Americans as they explored and settled in the United States. The honey in this collection recreates the adventure and spirit of our forefathers and tell a story of the formative era in American history – a period dating from the mid-eighteenth century to the...

2014-02-19 12:22:17

Small Flying Vehicles, Complete with Flapping Wings, may Emerge from Study of Fruit Bats WASHINGTON, Feb. 19, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- By exploring how creatures in nature are able to fly by flapping their wings, Virginia Tech researchers hope to apply that knowledge toward designing small flying vehicles known as "micro air vehicles" with flapping wings. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130627/DC39790LOGO) More than 1,000 species of bats have hand membrane wings,...

Discovery Of Two New Butterfly Species In Eastern USA
2014-02-19 11:31:56

Pensoft Publishers Butterflies are probably best-loved insects. As such, they are relatively well studied, especially in the United States. Eastern parts of the country are explored most thoroughly. First eastern US butterfly species were described by the father of modern taxonomy Carl Linnaeus himself, over 250 years ago. For the last two and a half centuries, naturalists have been cataloguing species diversity of eastern butterflies, and every nook and cranny has been searched. Some...

2014-02-17 23:01:47

Bayer continues its tour to promote bee health across the country at top agriculture universities and Commodity Classic. Davis, CA (PRWEB) February 17, 2014 Bayer CropScience continued its second annual Bee Care Tour, a mobile tour designed to emphasize the important role bees play, last week in Davis, Calif. The Tour included an interactive exhibit with two frames of honey in a mobile hive, stewardship workshops and an expert presentation and panel discussion on issues impacting...


Latest Pollinators Reference Libraries

Melissophobia
2013-12-24 11:13:46

Melissophobia or the fear of bees, from Greek melissa, meaning honey bee and phobos, meaning fear, and sometimes misspelled as melissaphobia and known also as apiphobia, is one of the most common fears among people and is kind of a specific phobia. The majority of the population have been stung by a bee or had friends or family members stung. A child may fall victim to a bee sting while playing outside. The sting can be rather painful and in some individuals results in swelling which might...

Brandt’s Bat, Myitus brandtii
2013-10-11 08:07:41

The Brandt’s bat has a large population in northwest of England but is endangered in Austria. The Brandt’s Bat has shaggy brown fur with a pale grey belly. This bat is not a large bat and weighs less than half an ounce and measures up to two inches long. Its wingspan is more than triple its body length at 7.5 to 9.5 inches. Brandt’s bat eats only insects (insectivorous) and is not blind. However, echolocation is used for “night-vision,” so that while hunting at night it does...

Lesser Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae
2013-08-19 15:45:14

The lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat or more commonly as Sanborn’s long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in a different areas depending upon the season. Its summer range includes southern portions of Arizona, California, and New Mexico and a yearly range in southern and eastern portions of Mexico and coasts of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.  This species prefers a habitat within scrublands,...

Greater Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris nivalis
2013-08-19 15:40:45

The greater long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris nivalis), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in Mexico, Guatemala, and the United States. It prefers a habitat within temperate forests or desert scrublands. The greater long-nosed bat migrates seasonally to different areas of is range, most likely due to weather patterns and food abundance. In Mexico, the greater long-nosed bat roosts in male and female colonies, but during midsummer, after...

Southern Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris curasoae
2013-08-19 15:20:27

The southern long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae) is a species of leaf-nosed bat that is native to South America. It holds a range that includes Venezuela, Colombia, and the islands of Curaçao, Aruba, and Bonaire. It prefers a habitat within arid or semiarid climates along coastlines or in scrublands and thorn forests. The Curacao population was once thought to be a subspecies but is now classified as a population along with other populations of the species. The southern long-nosed bat...

More Articles (49 articles) »
Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
Related