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Latest Polychaete Stories

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2010-03-25 10:28:25

In the '80s, Spanish researchers found the first fossils of Cloudina in Spain, a small fossil of tubular appearance and one of the first animals that developed an external skeleton between 550 and 543 million years ago. Now paleontologists from the University of Extremadura have discovered a new species, Cloudina carinata, the fossil of which has preserved its tridimensional shape. "Cloudina carinata is characterized by its elaborate ornamentation and complexity of the shells and tube that...

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2010-01-28 09:42:17

A study of animals visible to the naked eye and living in and on the seabed "“ the 'macrobenthos' "“ of the Straits of Magellan and Drake Passage will help scientists understand the biodiversity, biogeography and ecology of the Magellanic region. "The biodiversity data are from my very first oceanographic cruise with the Chilean Navy in the Magellanic region in 1997, as an early undergraduate," said Dr Sven Thatje of the University of Southampton's School of Ocean and Earth...

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2009-11-11 08:30:00

It sounds like a classic horror story"”eyeless, mouthless worms lurk in the dark, settling onto dead animals and sending out green "roots" to devour their bones. In fact, such worms do exist in the deep sea. They were first discovered in 2002 by researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), who were using a robot submarine to explore Monterey Canyon. But that wasn't the end of the story. After "planting" several dead whales on the seafloor, a team of biologists...

2009-11-10 18:03:46

The females of the recently discovered Osedax marine worms feast on submerged bones via a complex relationship with symbiotic bacteria, and they are turning out to be far more diverse and widespread than scientists expected. Californian researchers investigating the genetic history of Osedax worms have found that up to twelve further distinct evolutionary lineages exist beyond the five species already described. The new findings about these beautiful sea creatures with unusual sexual and...

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2009-09-10 06:02:38

The large group of segmented worms known as annelids, which includes earthworms, leeches and bristle worms, evolved millions of years ago and can be found in every corner of the world. Although annelids are one of the most abundant animal groups on the planet, scientists have struggled to understand how the different species of this biologically diverse group relate to each other in terms of their evolutionary history. Now a team of scientists from Yale University and Dartmouth College has...

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2008-01-09 15:35:35

New Haven, Conn. -- Discovery of an exceptional fossil specimen in southeastern Morocco that preserves evidence of the animal's soft tissues has solved a paleontological puzzle about the origins of an extinct group of bizarre slug-like animals with rows of mineralized armor plates on their backs, according to a paper in Nature. While evolution has produced great diversity in the body designs of animals, over the course of history several highly distinct groups, such as trilobites and...


Latest Polychaete Reference Libraries

Trumpet Worm, Lagis koreni
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The trumpet worm (Lagis koreni) is a species of polychaete worm that is classified within the Annelida phylum. It can be found in the waters around Europe including the North Sea, the Arctic Ocean, the Mediterranean Sea, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Adriatic Sea. This species is typically found submersed in sand in the neritic zone. The trumpet worm can reach an average length of about one inch and is typically light pink in color, with visible red veins and two pairs of red gills. This...

Pompeii Worm, Alvinella pompejana
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Pompeii worm (Alvinella pompejana) is a species of polychaete worm, or bristle worm that is only found in the Pacific Ocean. It resides at hydrothermal vents, making it an extremophile, and was first discovered French marine biologists of the coat of the Galapagos Islands in the 1980s. It was described by Lucien Laubier and Daniel Desbruyeres as a deep-sea polychaete that could withstand extreme amounts of heat. The Pompeii worm can reach an average length of up to five inches and is...

Honeycomb Worm, Sabellaria alveolata
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The honeycomb worm (Sabellaria alveolata) is a species of worm that is classified within the Annelida phylum. Its range includes the Mediterranean Sea and the waters of Morocco north to the Atlantic Ocean, extending to the British Isles in the northeast. This species is known as a reef-forming polychaete, because its builds reefs. These reefs are shaped like a honeycomb, the feature from which worm derives its common name. The reefs are formed when the worms create tube-like structures within...

Christmas Tree Worm, Spirobranchus giganteus
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Christmas Tree Worm (Spirobranchus giganteus) is a species of small, tube-building polychaete worm in the Serpulidae family. It is widely distributed throughout the world’s tropical oceans, occurring abundantly from the Caribbean to the Indo-Pacific. The worm’s common and scientific nomenclature refers to the two chromatically hued spiral structures, most prominently seen by divers. These multicolored spiral structures are actually part of the worm’s highly derived respiratory...

Bobbit Worm, Eunice aphroditois
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Bobbit Worm (Eunice aphroditois) is a species of aquatic polychaete worm found on the ocean floor at depths of 33 to 130 feet. It is only found in the Indo-Pacific oceanic region. This predatory organism buries its long body in gravel, mud or corals in the ocean bed, where it waits patiently for prey food to touch one of its five antennae. When touched, the worm, armed with razor sharp teeth shoots out at its attacker with such speed that it sometimes slices the prey in half. Little is...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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