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Latest Polycomb-group proteins Stories

2013-02-08 10:56:08

A single embryonic stem cell can develop into more than 200 specialized cell types that make up our body. This maturation process is called differentiation and is tightly regulated through strict control of gene activity. If the regulation is lost, specialized cells cannot develop correctly during development. In adulthood, the specialized cells may forget their identity and develop into cancer cells. Research from BRIC, University of Copenhagen, has identified a crucial role of the molecule...

2012-09-17 16:58:52

The first detailed and complete picture of a protein complex that is tied to human birth defects as well as the progression of many forms of cancer has been obtained by an international team of researchers led by scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)´s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). Knowing the architecture of this protein,  PRC2, for Polycomb Repressive Complex 2, should be a boon to its future use in the development of new and improved...

2012-04-30 19:56:02

Stowers scientists use fruit flies to reveal unknown function of a transcriptional regulator of development and cancer Historically, fly and human Polycomb proteins were considered textbook exemplars of transcriptional repressors, or proteins that silence the process by which DNA gives rise to new proteins. Now, work by a team of researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research challenges that dogma. In a cover story in the May 2012 issue of the journal Molecular and Cellular...

2012-04-02 20:37:33

The target, PRC2, is a lysine methyltransferase-containing protein complex with components that can be readily targeted with small molecule inhibitors Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory have identified a candidate drug target for treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a white blood cell cancer that proliferates out of control in the bone marrow. The team, led by Assistant Professor Chris Vakoc, M.D., Ph.D., shows that blocking a protein called PRC2 halts this uncontrolled...

2012-03-14 12:48:44

CPRIT grant helps Rice, BCM crack problem of predicting gene targets for PcG proteins Cancer is usually attributed to faulty genes, but growing evidence from the field of cancer epigenetics indicates a key role for the gene “silencing” proteins that stably turn genes off inside the cell nucleus. A new study from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) promises to speed research in the field by rapidly identifying the genes that epigenetic proteins can target for...

2012-01-12 21:04:55

Newly identified genetic alterations in T-ALL provides new potential treatment strategies for devastating childhood leukemia A new study published in the journal Nature Medicine by NYU Cancer Institute researchers, shows how the cancer causing gene Notch, in combination with a mutated Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) protein complex, work together to cause T- cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). T-ALL is an aggressive blood cancer, predominately diagnosed in children. It...

2010-06-11 13:47:53

The mechanism by which 'polycomb' proteins critical for embyronic stem cell function and fate are targeted to DNA has been identified by UCL scientists. The discovery, which has implications for the fields of stem cell and tissue engineering, is detailed in research published today in the journal Molecular Cell. A key feature of stem cells is the suppression of genes that when later switched on lead to the differentiation of the cells into specific mature cell types, such as neurons or immune...

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2010-05-03 09:10:04

During embryonic development, proteins called Polycomb group complexes turn genes off when and where their activity must not be present, preventing specialized tissues and organs from forming in the wrong places. They also play an important role in processes like stem cell differentiation and cancer. In a study published online Sunday May 2 in Nature, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, identified a new Polycomb group complex, and were...

2010-04-22 16:57:33

New on-off switches: SUMO protein silences developmental genes, SNP2 snips SUMO to allow gene expression HOUSTON "“ Deleting a gene in mouse embryos caused cardiac defects and early death, leading researchers to identify a mechanism that turns developmental genes off and on as an embryo matures, a team led by a scientist at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center reported today in Molecular Cell. "Our study focused on regulation of two genes that are critical to the healthy...

2009-12-25 21:50:53

Like a child awaiting the arrival of Christmas, embryonic stem cells exist in a state of permanent anticipation. They must balance the ability to quickly become more specialized cell types with the cellular chaos that could occur should they act too early (stop shaking those presents, kids!). Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have now identified a critical component, called Jarid2, of this delicate balancing act "” one that both recruits other regulatory proteins...


Word of the Day
bodacious
  • Remarkable; prodigious.
  • Audacious; gutsy.
  • Completely; extremely.
  • Audaciously; boldly.
  • Impressively great in size; enormous; extraordinary.
This word is probably from the dialectal 'boldacious,' a blend of 'bold' and 'audacious.'
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