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Latest Polymorphism Stories

2014-01-03 15:49:03

Scientists have discovered a mutation with a built-in dilemma for dairy cattle breeders. The deleted gene sequence has a positive effect on milk yield but causes embryonic death in dairy cattle. Scientists have found a genomic deletion that affects fertility and milk yield in dairy cattle at the same time. The discovery can help explain a dilemma in dairy cattle breeding: the negative correlation between fertility and milk production. For the past many years milk yield in Scandinavian...

Researchers Discover Molecular Causes For Sex Determination In Honey Bees
2013-12-31 06:56:40

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online New research appearing in the December issue of the journal Cell Biology puts together the final pieces in a puzzle 200 years in the making – determining the molecular evolution in the genes that separate male honey bees from female ones. Lead author Martin Beye, a professor with the Institute of Evolutionary Genetics at the University of Düsseldorf, and his colleagues studied 14 natural sequence variants of the complementary...

Detailing The Evolution Of Plumage Patterns In Male, Female Birds
2013-12-19 14:06:31

Gerard LeBlond for redorbit.com - Your Universe Online Waterfowl such as ducks, geese and swans belong to the order Anseriformes. Game birds such as pheasants, partridges, hens and turkeys are known as the order Galliformes. The birds belonging to both of these orders are recognized not only for their meat, but also for the elegant display of their plumage. Some members within the orders show differences between male and female, known as sexual dimorphism. Such as with the mallard, the...

Bitter Taste Gene May Have Been Beneficial To Human Evolution
2013-11-12 13:31:37

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It can be puzzling sometimes when someone else finds the taste of your favorite food to be disgusting, but research has shown we all perceive the taste of various compounds differently. A new study from researchers at the University of Pennsylvania has found a genetic mutation making certain people more sensitive to the taste of a bitter compound could have been beneficial for certain human populations in Africa, resulting in the...

Research Shows Cuckoos Impersonate Hawks By Matching Their 'Outfits'
2013-10-16 11:54:30

University of Cambridge New research shows that cuckoos have striped or "barred" feathers that resemble local birds of prey, such as sparrowhawks, that may be used to frighten birds into briefly fleeing their nest in order to lay their parasitic eggs. By using the latest digital image analysis techniques, and accounting for "bird vision" - by converting images to the spectral sensitivity of birds - researchers have been able to show for the first time that the barred patterns on a...

Researchers Discover 'Dark Side' Gene
2013-10-10 13:56:17

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online According to a new study published in Psychological Science, some people are genetically predisposed to have a darker perspective. Researchers found that a previously known gene variant can cause some people to perceive negative emotional events more vividly than others. “This is the first study to find that this genetic variation can significantly affect how people see and experience the world,” Professor Rebecca Todd of the...

2013-09-26 11:52:00

A new study finds AGT 'CC' genotype is more common in elite power athletes, but not in endurance sports, reports Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research A specific gene variant is more frequent among elite athletes in power sports, reports a study in the October issue of The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, official research journal of the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of...

2013-07-11 14:26:16

Human migrations—from the prehistoric epoch to the present day—have extended cultures across the globe. With these travelers have come unwanted stowaways: mosquito-borne parasites belonging to the Plasmodium species— a group responsible for malaria worldwide. Ananias Escalante, a researcher at Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute, as part of a team of collaborators from 10 countries, has been tracking the...

2013-07-09 16:40:48

By studying rapidly evolving bacteria as they diversify and compete under varying environmental conditions, researchers have shown that temporal niches are important to maintaining biodiversity in natural systems. The research is believed to be the first experimental demonstration of temporal niche dynamics promoting biodiversity over evolutionary time scales. The temporal niches – changes in environmental conditions that occur during specific periods of time...

2013-06-12 13:19:59

Parasites comprise a large proportion of the diversity of species in every ecosystem. Despite this, they are rarely included in analyses or models of food webs. If parasites play different roles from other predators and prey, however, their inclusion could fundamentally alter our understanding of how food webs are organized. In a paper published 11 June in the open access journal PLOS Biology, Santa Fe Institute Professor Jennifer Dunne and her team test this assertion and show that including...


Latest Polymorphism Reference Libraries

Grove Snail, Cepaea nemoralis
2013-10-14 10:20:27

The Grove Snail (Cepaea nemoralis) is a species of air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk. It is one of the most common species of land snail within Europe and has been introduced to North America. C. nemoralis is the type species regarding the genus Cepaea. It is used as a model organism in citizen science projects. This snail species is among the largest due to its polymorphism and bright colors. The color of the shell is very variable, reddish, yellow,...

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Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.