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Latest Polymorphism Stories

Image 1 - Misleading Morphology
2011-10-27 04:35:18

3 European parasitoid wasp 'species' are seasonal forms of just 1 Three widely differing forms of European Scambus parasitoid wasps that had previously been regarded as distinct species are shown to be seasonal morphs of a single species. The collaboration involved National Museums Scotland (Mark Shaw), a private individual (Malcolm Jennings) and Imperial College London + Natural History Museum (Donald Quicke). It was published in the open access Journal of Hymenoptera Research. The...

Image 1 - Plant Genomes May Help Next Generation Respond To Climate Change
2011-10-07 03:49:35

In the face of climate change, animals have an advantage over plants: They can move. But a new study led by Brown University researchers shows that plants may have some tricks of their own. In a paper published in Science, the research team identifies the genetic signature in the common European plant Arabidopsis thaliana that governs the plant´s fitness – its ability to survive and reproduce – in different climates. The researchers further find that climate in large...

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2011-08-15 07:09:20

The mystery of how a butterfly has changed its wing patterns to mimic neighboring species and avoid being eaten by birds has been solved by a team of European scientists. The study was published August 14, 2011 in the journal Nature. The greatest evolutionary thinkers, including Wallace, Bates and Darwin, have all wondered how butterflies that taste bad to birds have evolved the same patterns of warning coloration. Now for the first time, researchers led by the CNRS (Mus©um National...

2011-06-09 15:19:55

For tens of thousands of years, the genomes of malaria parasites and humans have been at war with one another. Now, University of Pennsylvania geneticists, in collaboration with an international team of scientists, have developed a new picture of one way that the human genome has fought back. The international team was led by Sarah Tishkoff, a Penn Integrates Knowledge professor with appointments in the genetics department in Penn's Perelman School of Medicine and the biology department of...

2011-06-03 08:09:45

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Killing about a million people a year, malaria is one of the deadliest diseases in the world. Ninety percent of its victims live in Africa. The genomes of malaria parasites and humans have been battling one another for tens of thousands of years. Geneticists at the University of Pennsylvania have discovered new evidence of one way the human genome has attacked back. Since different populations show different reactions to the parasites that cause malaria, the...

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2010-08-03 09:39:51

It's a question that has puzzled scientists for years: why, in some species of spiders, are the females so much larger than their male counterparts? Now, investigators from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) believe they have found the answer. According to their findings, which are published in Wednesday's edition of the open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology, the cause is likely tied to bridging, a technique of transportation used by some spiders to cross large gaps. When...

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2010-06-15 10:55:57

Three genes that have barely been studied to date have now provided fresh knowledge about patients with suicidal backgrounds. This is the result of a study by a team of Spanish researchers at Mount Sinai Hospital and Columbia University in the City of New York (United States), which found that several mutations are involved. This finding could help to develop future genetic tests to identify predisposition to suicide, without ignoring the importance of social and cultural factors. "There is...

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2010-05-09 08:31:03

Disease risk in later life differs for women and men -- scientists at the Power of Programming Conference presented evidence to demonstrate this may start in the womb Pregnancy places competing demands on a mother's physiology: Her body wants to produce a strong healthy baby but not at the expense of her own health. Some of the genes that she passes on to her child therefore try to protect her own body from excessive demands from her child. These so-called "imprinted genes" inherited from the...

2010-04-05 14:34:16

Biologists long have known that both the appearance of organisms and their inner workings are shaped by evolution. But do the same genetic mechanisms underlie changes in form and function? A new study by scientists at the University of Michigan and Taiwan's National Health Research Institutes suggests not. The research is scheduled for online publication in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences during the week of April 5. In the study, U-M evolutionary biologist Jianzhi "George"...

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2010-03-11 14:47:10

In most animal species, males and females show obvious differences in body size. But how can this be, given that both sexes share the same genes governing their growth? University of Arizona entomologists studied this conundrum in moths and found clues that had been overlooked by previous efforts to explain this mystery of nature. Take a look around in the animal world and you will find that, in most organisms, individuals of one sex are larger than the other of the species. Even though...


Latest Polymorphism Reference Libraries

Grove Snail, Cepaea nemoralis
2013-10-14 10:20:27

The Grove Snail (Cepaea nemoralis) is a species of air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk. It is one of the most common species of land snail within Europe and has been introduced to North America. C. nemoralis is the type species regarding the genus Cepaea. It is used as a model organism in citizen science projects. This snail species is among the largest due to its polymorphism and bright colors. The color of the shell is very variable, reddish, yellow,...

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Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.