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Latest Polymorphism Stories

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2010-02-19 08:20:00

New research on lizards supports an old idea about how species can originate. Morphologically distinct types are often found within species, and biologists have speculated that these "morphs" could be the raw material for speciation. What were once different types of individuals within the same population could eventually evolve into separate species. A new study conducted by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, supports this idea. The study documents the disappearance of...

2009-12-02 18:16:33

Looks can be deceiving, but certain bird species have figured out that a voice can tell them most of what they need to know to find the right mate. Andrew DeWoody, a Purdue University associate professor of forestry and natural resources, found that the higher the pitch of a male bird's song, the more genetic diversity that bird has, making him a better mate for breeding. His study was published Wednesday (Dec. 2) in the early online edition of PLoS Biology. "If you have a diverse set of...

2009-11-11 17:25:26

Engineers at the University of Leeds have developed a simple technology which can be used in existing chemical reactors to ensure "right first time" drug crystal formation. Ensuring drug crystals are formed correctly is crucial to their efficacy and the efficiency of pharmaceutical manufacturers' operations. Using self-assembled monolayers, the team has been able to show that crystals form into their desired product form with the correct shape and particle structure, without the usual...

2009-10-27 09:15:32

While many genetic studies have examined alcoholism among adults, identifying genes that are associated with alcohol misuse during youth is equally important, given that genetic and environmental influences on alcoholism vary across development. New findings show an association between a polymorphism of the µ-opioid receptor (OPRM1) gene and alcohol misuse among adolescents. Results will be published in the January 2010 issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental...

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2009-10-03 09:44:55

Diversity of fish in East African lakes points to mechanism for evolution of sex chromosomes Biologists have genetically mapped the sex chromosomes of several species of cichlid fish from Lake Malawi, East Africa, and identified a mechanism by which new sex chromosomes may evolve. In research published in this week's issue of the journal Science, biologists Thomas Kocher, Reade Roberts and Jennifer Ser of the University of Maryland describe the genetic basis for two co-existing systems of...

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2009-08-31 11:50:00

Travelers to the neotropics"”the tropical lands of the Americas"”might be forgiven for thinking that all of the colorful insects flittering over sunny puddles or among dense forest understory are butterflies. In fact, many are not. Some are moths that have reinvented themselves as butterflies, converging on the daytime niche typically dominated by their less hairy relatives. Now, a new revision of the taxonomic relationships among one such group of insects, the subfamily...

2009-08-11 09:23:26

Cicadas - better known for providing the soundtrack of our hot summer are remarkably interesting animals, they are the longest living insects "“ 17 years for some species "“ but spent 99% of this time underground to then emerge for a few weeks, reproduce and finally die. Now a study of north-African and Mediterranean cicadas by scientists in Portugal and the UK uncover yet more interesting data on the group by revealing that these species although differentiated by their mating...

2009-08-04 09:42:54

An area of chromosome 6 that affects cattle carcass weight has been identified using two different Japanese species. Knowledge of this four-gene region, described in the open access journal BMC Genetics, should be useful in breeding beef cattle.Akiko Takasuga, from the Shirakawa Institute of Animal Genetics, led a team of researchers who studied Japanese Black and Japanese Brown cattle, two breeds that have survived separately for thousands of years. According to Takasuga, "The 591-kb...

2009-07-24 14:52:23

Animals of the same species who look different from each other may have evolved that way to deter predators, British scientists said. Distinctly different looking animals within the same species -- known as exuberant polymorphisms -- can reach double figures within a single animal population, biologist Geoff Oxford of the University of York said in a release Thursday. A prime example is the Hawaiian Happy-face Spider, which varies from plain yellow to rare types with red, black or white...

2009-07-23 09:32:15

In the animal kingdom, everything is not as it seems. Individuals of the same species can look very different from each other - what biologists term 'polymorphism.' Sometimes the number of distinct visible forms - 'exuberant polymorphisms' -- in a single animal population can reach double figures. But why?Scientists at the University of York have developed computer models that may help to explain how this level of variation arises and persists. Their research is reported in the latest issue...


Latest Polymorphism Reference Libraries

Grove Snail, Cepaea nemoralis
2013-10-14 10:20:27

The Grove Snail (Cepaea nemoralis) is a species of air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk. It is one of the most common species of land snail within Europe and has been introduced to North America. C. nemoralis is the type species regarding the genus Cepaea. It is used as a model organism in citizen science projects. This snail species is among the largest due to its polymorphism and bright colors. The color of the shell is very variable, reddish, yellow,...

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Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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