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Discovery Of The Most Famous Wheat Gene Clears Way To Breed

Discovery Of The 'Most Famous Wheat Gene' Clears Way To Breed Better, Non-GMO Wheat

By Eric Sorensen, Washington State University Washington State University researchers have found “the most famous wheat gene,” a reproductive traffic cop of sorts that can be used to transfer valuable genes from other plants to wheat....

Latest Polyploid Stories

2014-07-15 09:59:46

University of Oxford Early maize farmers selected for genes that improved the harvesting of sunlight, a new detailed study of how plants use 'doubles' of their genomes reveals. The findings could help current efforts to improve existing crop varieties. Oxford University researchers captured a 'genetic snapshot' of maize as it existed 10 million years ago when the plant made a double of its genome – a 'whole genome duplication' event. They then traced how maize evolved to use these...

Geneticists Map Genome Of An Important Global Crop: The Peanut
2014-04-03 07:29:48

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Peanuts are seemingly everywhere in the US. From cooking oils to candy bars, peanuts are a part of our lives, and a big business. And now, for the first time, a multinational group of crop geneticists has sequenced the peanut genome. The researchers are from the International Peanut Genome Initiative (IPGI), led by Scott Jackson, who serves as chair of the IPGI. Jackson is also the director of the University of Georgia Center for...

2014-01-24 08:21:37

Wheat Consortium to receive EUR 1 million from Bayer CropScience to complete physical maps. Sequencing wheat genome will accelerate improved wheat variety development. Target traits are yield potential and resistance against drought, diseases, and pests. BETHESDA, Md., Jan. 24, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- The International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) announced today that it will receive approximately EUR1 million over the next six months from Bayer CropScience (BCS) to...

Brown University
2014-01-06 08:12:29

Brown University Mating and meiosis – the specialized cell division that reduces the number of chromosomes in a cell – are related, but in most yeasts they are regulated separately. Not so in Candida lusitaniae, where the two programs work in unison, according to a new study in Nature. Comparison with other species suggests that this fusion may support C. lusitaniae’s “haploid lifestyle” of maintaining only one set of chromosomes in each cell. From a biological point of view,...

2013-11-26 14:25:32

Plants can reproduce in a multitude of different ways, unlike humans and animals. Scientists at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna have been working on developing new varieties of chamomile that can be cultivated as a medicinal plant. The researchers have been trying to identify varieties that will bloom longer and make its cultivation easier. Their methods and results have recently been published in the scientific press. Chamomile is a medicinal plant used mainly in the...

Kiwi Genome Reveals A Few Surprises
2013-10-27 05:36:19

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Scientists working to sequence the genome of the kiwifruit have revealed that the berry has recently undergone a pair of whole-genome duplication events, according to new research published earlier this month in the journal Nature Communications. Zhangjun Fei, an associate professor at the Boyce Thompson Institute at Cornell University, and his colleagues also discovered that there were many similarities between the kiwi’s more...

Cotton Genome Sequenced
2012-12-20 08:13:13

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online In research that could help the development of next-generation biofuels, an international team of scientists has successfully sequenced the genome of the most basic form of cotton plant. The US Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), along with representatives of 30 other institutions from across the globe, has completed a high-quality draft assembly of the Gossypium raimondii genome, a forerunner of the modern...

Plant Chromosome Number Variation From Mediterranean Coasts To Tatra Mountains And Beyond
2012-11-27 15:37:25

Pensoft Publishers Chromosome number is the most basic feature concerning the genome of a species, and it is known for about one third of higher plant species. In particular, for plants of Italy, Slovakia, and Poland, online chromosome number databases have been developed: 'Chrobase.it — Chromosome numbers for the Italian flora', 'Karyological database of ferns and flowering plants of Slovakia' and 'Chromosome number database — PLANTS', respectively. The three datasets account...

Extra Set Of Chromosomes Commonly Carried By Western Aspen Trees
2012-11-01 07:01:47

Public Library of Science Over 60 percent of aspen in parts of Utah, Colorado are triploid, new study shows A large proportion of aspen in the western U.S. sport an extra set of chromosomes in their cells, a phenomenon termed triploidy, according to new research published Oct. 31 in the open access journal PLoS ONE by Karen Mock from Utah State University and colleagues at several other institutions. In some areas of southern Utah and Colorado, over 60% of aspen trees are triploid....


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.