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Latest Polysaccharide encapsulated bacteria Stories

2014-06-04 14:47:03

PLOS A 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) is effective in reducing the number of new cases of likely-bacterial community-acquired pneumonia in infants in Latin America, according to a study published in this week's PLOS Medicine. Xavier Sáez-Llorens and colleagues from Department of Infectious Diseases, Panama found that the 10-valent PCV reduced the number of new cases of likely-bacterial community-acquired pneumonia in infants by 22% (95% CI: 7.7, 34.2) compared to those...

2014-02-24 08:05:42

IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute) This discovery clears the path to developing more efficient vaccines against meningitis and pneumonia, responsible for the death of millions of children every year Researchers have discovered the presence of a novel subtype of innate lymphoid cells in human spleen essential for the production of antibodies. This discovery, published in the prestigious journal Nature Immunology, clears the path to the identification of novel strategies...

2013-04-24 12:02:58

In a study that included nearly 3,000 adults from Denmark, a diagnosis of meningococcal, pneumococcal, or Haemophilus influenzae meningitis in childhood was associated with lower educational achievement and economic self-sufficiency in adult life, according to a study in the April 24 issue of JAMA. Bacterial meningitis may lead to brain damage due to several factors, and survivors of childhood bacterial meningitis are at particular risk of hearing loss, seizure disorders, motor deficits,...

Bacterial Transfer Of Resistance Genes Targeted By Scientists
2012-10-24 14:58:18

The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae — which can cause pneumonia, meningitis, bacteremia and sepsis — likes to share its antibiotic-defeating weaponry with its neighbors. Individual cells can pass resistance genes to one another through a process called horizontal gene transfer, or by "transformation," the uptake of DNA from the environment. Now researchers report that they can interrupt the cascade of cellular events that allows S. pneumoniae to swap or suck up DNA. The new...

2011-11-11 18:24:01

Vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae type b, or Hib, once the most common cause of bacterial meningitis in children, has dramatically reduced the incidence of Hib disease in young children over the past 20 years, according to a study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online (http://www.oxfordjournals.com/our_journals/cid/prpaper1.pdf). However, other strains of the bacteria continue to cause substantial disease among the nation's youngest and oldest age groups....

2010-12-08 14:11:45

Second-hand smoke increases risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children Children exposed to second-hand smoke are more likely to get invasive meningococcal disease than children who are not exposed, reports a study from Chien-Chang Lee at the Harvard School of Public Health (Boston, USA) and colleagues published in this week's PLoS Medicine. The authors also found a possible association of second-hand smoke exposure with invasive pneumococcal disease and Haemophilus influenzae type b....

2010-09-08 13:50:41

Infants who received heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination (PCV-7) at 2, 4, and 11 months were more likely than unvaccinated controls to have nasopharyngeal (in the nasal passages and upper part of the throat behind the nose) acquisition of pneumococcal serotype 19A, a leading cause of respiratory pneumococcal disease, according to a study in the September 8 issue of JAMA. "A rapid increase in the presence of pneumococcal serotype 19A strains that are often multiresistant to...

2010-06-18 02:04:45

It's a tragedy of war that innocent bystanders often get caught in the crossfire. But now scientists at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oxford have shown how a battle for survival at a microscopic level could leave humans as the unlikely victims. In work funded by the US Public Health Service and the Wellcome Trust, the researchers have found a possible explanation for why some bacteria turn nasty, even at great risk to their own survival. The body is home to a wide range...

2010-02-23 09:10:30

The pneumococcal vaccine for infants and children introduced in 2000 caused a precipitous drop in infections until 2005, when serious illnesses began to rise again, especially infections caused by a strain of the pneumococcal bacteria called 19A, said researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital in a report in the current issue of the journal Pediatrics. "Of the serotypes (or variants) of Streptococcus pneumoniae (the bacteria that cause pneumococcal disease) now...

2010-01-22 12:37:30

Current research suggests that the flu may predispose to secondary bacterial infections, which account for a significant proportion of mortality during flu pandemics. The related report by Lee et al, "A mouse model of lethal synergism between influenza virus and Haemophilus influenzae," appears in the February 2010 issue of The American Journal of Pathology. Influenza affects between three and five million people annually, causing up to 500,000 deaths worldwide. While most people will recover...


Latest Polysaccharide encapsulated bacteria Reference Libraries

0_9fb0173be70876d98667eddc1e274866
2011-04-28 14:27:08

Streptococcus pneumoniae, or pneumococcus, is Gram-positive, alpha-hemolytic, bile-soluble aerotolerant, anaerobic member of the genus Streptococcus. It was recognized as a major cause of pneumonia in the late 19th century and is thus the subject of many humoral immunity studies. It causes many other types of pneumococcal infections other than pneumonia including acute sinusitis, otitis media, meningitis, bacteremia, sepsis, septic arthritis, peritonitis, cellulites, and brain abscess. It...

72_63ad42c17b548b76aff6af345a402a04
2011-04-15 15:26:30

Haemophilus influenzae is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium first described in 1892 by Richard Pfeiffer during an influenza pandemic. It is generally aerobic but can grow as a facultative anaerobe. H. influenzae was mistakenly considered to be the cause of influenza until 1933 when the flu virology became apparent. It was the first free-living organism to have its entire genome sequenced. The project was completed and published in 1995. Two major categories were defined: the...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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