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Latest Population ecology Stories

United States Amphibian Populations Rapidly Declining
2013-05-25 05:57:30

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The number of frogs, toads and salamanders in the US could be falling at an even more severe and widespread rate than previously believed, and even amphibian populations thought to be stable are actually on the decline, according to new research for the US Geological Survey (USGS). The study, which was published earlier this week in the journal PLOS ONE, is believed to be the first-ever estimate of how quickly amphibians across...

2013-04-19 20:20:48

SANTA BARBARA, Calif., April 19, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As another Earth Day rolls around, a California organization reminds us that population growth is still the fundamental environmental problem. "The consequences of that growth are all around us--loss of open space, air and water pollution, traffic congestion, and never-ending sprawl," said Jo Wideman, executive director of Californians for Population Stabilization (CAPS). "Habitat loss due to population growth is the greatest...

2012-10-04 06:22:28

HARRISBURG, Pa., Oct. 4, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Following significant public comment, Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director Carl G. Roe today announced that the agency will not be moving forward to draft regulatory changes to place three species of bats on the Commonwealth's endangered species list. While some comments supported listing bats, Roe said more discussion, research and coordination need to be done before the agency takes such action. "The Game Commission has...

Bats Get Help From A Manmade Cave
2012-09-15 05:28:34

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online An artificial cave, designed to help protect bats from a fungal ailment that to date has killed more than six million of the creatures throughout North America, has been constructed by conservationists in the woods of Tennessee, according to various media outlets published Friday. The project, which Randall Dickerson of the Associated Press (AP) reports cost an estimated $300,000 and was built by The Nature Conservancy, is...

Frog Diseases Increasing
2012-07-19 10:38:29

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In addition to the stresses placed on amphibians, or perhaps because of them, they are now more likely to succumb to debilitating infectious diseases. In recent decades, disease seems to have taken a more prominent role in the amphibian mortality rate, according to a new study published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. Along with climate change, habitat destruction, pollution and invasive species, these creatures...

2012-06-28 06:24:13

NEW YORK, June 28, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The following is a Statement by Dr. Peter Daszak, President, EcoHealth Alliance: EcoHealth Alliance, an organization with a long history of ground-breaking work on species declines by our disease discovery experts, welcomes the publication of two new papers on the critical issue of honey bee colony declines, focusing on the role of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor. The mite was introduced in South America in the late 1970s, across Europe...

2012-05-31 01:22:21

Humans spend greater than 90 percent of their time indoors, but we're never alone there. Bacteria and viruses, scientists estimate, make up half of the world's biomass–some 10 nonillion (1 followed by 31 zeros) microorganisms–and we most often meet them within enclosed spaces. So, that's where the modern microbe hunter often looks first. A new report issued by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) offers guidance to make the hunting more effective. A...

2012-05-09 21:22:44

Researchers have found that bird species with multiple plumage color forms within in the same population, evolve into new species faster than those with only one color form, confirming a 60 year-old evolution theory. The global study used information from birdwatchers and geneticists accumulated over decades and was conducted by University of Melbourne scientists Dr Devi Stuart-Fox and Dr Andrew Hugall (now based at the Melbourne Museum) and is published in the journal Nature. The link...

Biologists Turn Back The Clock To Understand Evolution Of Sex Differences
2012-05-03 12:44:23

Battles of sexes shown to spur adaptive sex differences Sex differences account for some of the most of the spectacular traits in nature: the wild colors of male guppies, the plumage of peacocks, tusks on walruses and antlers on moose. Sexual conflict — the battle between males and females over mating — is thought to be a particularly potent force in driving the evolution traits that differ in males and females. However, the genetic processes responsible for producing such...

2012-04-12 23:01:13

Two Bucknell professors have received a U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service grant to find out whether certain genetic characteristics, behavior and environmental factors contribute to the severity of the white-nose syndrome, which has killed up to 6.7 million bats in eastern North America. LEWISBURG, Pa. (PRWEB) April 12, 2012 Two Bucknell University biologists are leading an investigation into how and why some bats survive — and others die — when exposed to the tell-tale fungus...