Quantcast

Latest Population ecology Stories

2012-05-31 01:22:21

Humans spend greater than 90 percent of their time indoors, but we're never alone there. Bacteria and viruses, scientists estimate, make up half of the world's biomass–some 10 nonillion (1 followed by 31 zeros) microorganisms–and we most often meet them within enclosed spaces. So, that's where the modern microbe hunter often looks first. A new report issued by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) offers guidance to make the hunting more effective. A...

2012-05-09 21:22:44

Researchers have found that bird species with multiple plumage color forms within in the same population, evolve into new species faster than those with only one color form, confirming a 60 year-old evolution theory. The global study used information from birdwatchers and geneticists accumulated over decades and was conducted by University of Melbourne scientists Dr Devi Stuart-Fox and Dr Andrew Hugall (now based at the Melbourne Museum) and is published in the journal Nature. The link...

Biologists Turn Back The Clock To Understand Evolution Of Sex Differences
2012-05-03 12:44:23

Battles of sexes shown to spur adaptive sex differences Sex differences account for some of the most of the spectacular traits in nature: the wild colors of male guppies, the plumage of peacocks, tusks on walruses and antlers on moose. Sexual conflict — the battle between males and females over mating — is thought to be a particularly potent force in driving the evolution traits that differ in males and females. However, the genetic processes responsible for producing such...

2012-04-12 23:01:13

Two Bucknell professors have received a U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service grant to find out whether certain genetic characteristics, behavior and environmental factors contribute to the severity of the white-nose syndrome, which has killed up to 6.7 million bats in eastern North America. LEWISBURG, Pa. (PRWEB) April 12, 2012 Two Bucknell University biologists are leading an investigation into how and why some bats survive — and others die — when exposed to the tell-tale fungus...

2012-04-11 23:01:07

With 6.7 million bats already dead, scientists believe the fast-spreading disease called White-nose Syndrome could lead to the extinction of some species. Lewisburg, PA (PRWEB) April 10, 2012 More than six million bats are dead, and millions more are expected to fall victim to a disease known as White-nose Syndrome, or WNS. First identified in the northeastern United States, WNS has wiped out an estimated 95% of Pennsylvania´s bat population and is quickly spreading across the country....

Bat-killing Fungus Traveled From Europe
2012-04-11 12:44:31

A new report released Monday says a European fungus is responsible for the deaths of millions of bats in the United States and Canada. It has long been a suspicion that an invasive species was responsible for carrying the deadly fungus. This research confirms the carrier was not native to North America. European bats have not been as vulnerable to “white nose syndrome,” the name of the fungal disease responsible for the deaths of American and Canadian bats alike. According to...

Bat Death Toll From White-nose Syndrome Keeps Climbing
2012-01-18 13:08:42

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said on Tuesday that the death toll for bats in North America that have suffered from White-nose Syndrome has exceeded 5.5 million. Biologists and partners of the service estimated that at least 5.7 million to 6.7 million bats have died from white-nose syndrome (WNS). The syndrome was first documented in New York in 2006, and the disease quickly spread into 16 states and four Canadian provinces. Bats with WNS have symptoms like flying around outside...


Word of the Day
lambent
  • Licking.
  • Hence Running along or over a surface, as if in the act of licking; flowing over or along; lapping or bathing; softly bright; gleaming.
This word comes the Latin 'lambere,' to lick.
Related