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Latest Population ecology Stories

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2007-05-02 13:24:20

BELTSVILLE, Md. -- The answer to what happened to America's vanishing honeybees is simple, a caller told entomologist May Berenbaum: Bee rapture. They were called away to heaven. No, wait, it's Earth's magnetic field, another caller told the University of Illinois professor. And when Berenbaum went on the Internet, she found a parody news site that quoted her as blaming rapper Kevin Federline and his concerts for the disappearance of the bees. Berenbaum loved it. The sudden disappearance of...

2005-09-20 15:54:04

WASHINGTON, DC (Sept. 20, 2005) "“ A summit of leading scientists have agreed to an action plan intended to save hundreds of frogs, salamanders and other amphibians facing extinction from familiar threats such as pollution and habitat destruction, as well as a little-known fungus wiping out their populations. The Amphibian Conservation Summit held Sept. 17-19 concluded with proposals for a series of actions, including emergency responses to save species under the greatest threat. More...

2005-09-20 09:17:20

WASHINGTON -- International conservation groups proposed a $404 million effort Monday to preserve frogs and other amphibians whose sensitive, porous skins often make them the first indicator of when nature goes awry. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature, Conservation International and other groups said they plan a series of emergency actions and long-term research that includes describing at least 1,000 new species, preventing future habitat loss and reducing trade in...

2005-07-08 19:00:00

In their article in the July 2005 issue of The American Naturalist, Yssa D. DeWoody, Zhilan Feng, and Robert K. Swihart (Purdue University) model species' occupancy within a patchy dynamic landscape. They derive deterministic persistence thresholds which depend jointly upon the spatial and temporal structure of the landscape, reinforcing the importance of spatio-temporal connectivity. This model has the potential to predict various consequences of different land-use strategies and thus serve...

2004-11-29 06:00:07

The West Midlands population is expected to increase by more than six per cent over the next 25 years, according to latest Government statistics. The region's numbers are expected to swell by 6.6 per cent to 5.7 million by 2028, according to the Office for National Statistics. The predicted increase follows a national pattern, with the North- east the only region expected to see its population decline. The South will continue to show the greatest population growth, with London expected...

2004-11-26 18:00:11

THE South of England will have to make room for another four million people over the next 25 years, it emerged yesterday. Government planners predict a population boom, fuelled by high levels of immigration, with the overwhelming majority settling in London, the rest of the South East, East Anglia and the South West. London's population will increase 15.4 per cent by 2028, the estimates say, even though 150,000 people a year are leaving the capital for the suburbs and the countryside in...