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Latest Population ecology Stories

2008-10-08 06:00:34

By Lyndsay Moss Health Correspondent PATIENTS undergoing surgery in Scotland will be able to see the death rate for the surgeon treating them after new figures were published yesterday. The statistics run from 2004 to 2007 , but experts said the "crude" data came with a "health warning" as it did not consider the types of operations being carried out or the severity of patients' illness. ISD (Information Services Division) Scotland, which publishes health statistics on a range of...

2008-08-11 18:00:58

POTTSTOWN, Pa., Aug. 11 /PRNewswire/ -- Diane's Discount Pet Supplies and Adoption Center announced today the opening of the Affordable Spay Neuter Clinic, located in the lower level of the retailer's Route 100 business in Pottstown, PA. The Clinic's mission is to help decrease the overwhelming pet overpopulation problem by providing affordable sterilizations for pets and feral cats in the region. "We are trying to take away cost as the reason for not having one's pet sterilized," says...

2008-07-10 06:00:16

By Candace Jarrett, Florence Morning News, S.C. Jul. 10--The Census Bureau's newly released figures show the population rate in the Pee Dee has remained stagnant since 2000 with few increases or decreases in cities and towns. "City population has not changed in the last 50 years or so in South Carolina," said Michael Macfarlane of SC State Data Center Office of Research and Statistics. Statistics for the Pee Dee show those cities or towns that have had a decline in population are the...

2008-07-06 21:00:10

Wildlife biologists say they are trying to learn why bats in the Northeast United States are dying of what's being called white-nose syndrome. Connecticut State Department of Environmental Protection biologists Jenny Dickson, Geoff Krukar and Christina Kocer say an unknown force has been driving bats to leave their caves earlier than normal in winter, The Hartford (Conn.) Courant reported Sunday. The animals then begin to starve as cold temperatures keep away their main food supply:...

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2007-05-02 13:24:20

BELTSVILLE, Md. -- The answer to what happened to America's vanishing honeybees is simple, a caller told entomologist May Berenbaum: Bee rapture. They were called away to heaven. No, wait, it's Earth's magnetic field, another caller told the University of Illinois professor. And when Berenbaum went on the Internet, she found a parody news site that quoted her as blaming rapper Kevin Federline and his concerts for the disappearance of the bees. Berenbaum loved it. The sudden disappearance of...

2005-09-20 15:54:04

WASHINGTON, DC (Sept. 20, 2005) "“ A summit of leading scientists have agreed to an action plan intended to save hundreds of frogs, salamanders and other amphibians facing extinction from familiar threats such as pollution and habitat destruction, as well as a little-known fungus wiping out their populations. The Amphibian Conservation Summit held Sept. 17-19 concluded with proposals for a series of actions, including emergency responses to save species under the greatest threat. More...

2005-09-20 09:17:20

WASHINGTON -- International conservation groups proposed a $404 million effort Monday to preserve frogs and other amphibians whose sensitive, porous skins often make them the first indicator of when nature goes awry. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature, Conservation International and other groups said they plan a series of emergency actions and long-term research that includes describing at least 1,000 new species, preventing future habitat loss and reducing trade in...

2005-07-08 19:00:00

In their article in the July 2005 issue of The American Naturalist, Yssa D. DeWoody, Zhilan Feng, and Robert K. Swihart (Purdue University) model species' occupancy within a patchy dynamic landscape. They derive deterministic persistence thresholds which depend jointly upon the spatial and temporal structure of the landscape, reinforcing the importance of spatio-temporal connectivity. This model has the potential to predict various consequences of different land-use strategies and thus serve...

2004-11-29 06:00:07

The West Midlands population is expected to increase by more than six per cent over the next 25 years, according to latest Government statistics. The region's numbers are expected to swell by 6.6 per cent to 5.7 million by 2028, according to the Office for National Statistics. The predicted increase follows a national pattern, with the North- east the only region expected to see its population decline. The South will continue to show the greatest population growth, with London expected...

2004-11-26 18:00:11

THE South of England will have to make room for another four million people over the next 25 years, it emerged yesterday. Government planners predict a population boom, fuelled by high levels of immigration, with the overwhelming majority settling in London, the rest of the South East, East Anglia and the South West. London's population will increase 15.4 per cent by 2028, the estimates say, even though 150,000 people a year are leaving the capital for the suburbs and the countryside in...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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