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Latest Population genetics Stories

2010-09-23 12:48:23

New research has found that a genetic variant which reduces the chance of contracting diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy is more prevalent in populations with long histories of urban living. The research, published in the journal Evolution, shows that in areas with a long history of urban settlements, today's inhabitants are more likely to possess the genetic variant which provides resistance to infection. In ancient cities, poor sanitation and high population densities would have...

2010-09-23 09:18:21

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Doctors cannot explain why one woman will develop ovarian cancer and another does not.  However, researchers have just identified four chromosome locations with genetic changes that are likely to alter a woman's risk of developing ovarian cancer. Spanning three continents and over 24,000 women, these findings have come from a large genome-wide associated study (GWAS) that has helped move researchers a major step closer to individualized risk assessment for ovarian...

2010-09-20 18:49:19

International study locates key genetic variations A consortium of cancer researchers has identified four chromosome locations with genetic changes that are likely to alter a woman's risk of developing ovarian cancer. The findings appear in Nature Genetics in an article authored by a Mayo Clinic researcher. Researchers say that while more needs to be learned about the function of the specific chromosomal regions involved in susceptibility, the discoveries move them a major step closer to...

2010-09-01 20:42:36

HapMap 3 points the way forward for human genetics studies New findings show the value of genetic studies across human populations and the value of the latest DNA sequencing technologies to interrogate genetic variation. The results, from the latest phase of the international HapMap Project, are reported in Nature. The researchers' extensive study of genetic variation in multiple populations will form a framework for future genetic studies of variation and disease: their findings highlight...

2010-07-21 15:18:14

How species form and what keeps them distinct from each other, even though they can interbreed, is a key question in evolution. Researchers from Taiwan, led by Dr. Jun-Yi Leu, an Assistant Research Fellow from the Institute of Molecular Biology at Academia Sinica, have recently identified genes in three closely-related yeast species that cause sterility, increasing our understanding of how species can remain distinct. The findings will be published next week in the online, open access journal...

2010-07-13 14:41:02

Genetic variant detected by genome-wide association found to increase expression of oncogene A genetic variant implicated in several cancers by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has been found to drive increased expression of a known oncogene in the prostate. The study, published July 13th in Genome Research, showcases a new protocol for studying the activity of cancer-risk variants suggested by GWAS studies. The results also underscore the dramatic consequences of small genetic changes...

2010-07-02 16:17:35

Fewer males than females are surviving the negative effects of inbreeding in a reintroduced population of a rare New Zealand bird, reports new research published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Studying a population of the endangered New Zealand Hihi, researchers from the Zoological Society of London found that male survival rate was 24 per cent lower than their female siblings during early development, and as chicks. The researchers analysed 98 clutches on Tiritiri Matangi Island, a...

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2010-07-02 05:40:00

Boston University researchers have discovered a genetic sequence that predicts with more accuracy than ever before whether a person will live to the age of 100 -- even if they have other genes associated with disease. The scientists studied over 1,055 centenarians to develop a system of genetic analysis that predicts with 77-percent accuracy whether a person has a strong chance of "exceptional longevity".  The predictions involve identifying the presence of 150 genetic variants known as...

2010-06-24 15:58:30

New study at University of Leicester aims to pave way for treatments New research at the University of Leicester will use the latest genetic techniques to examine DNA from over 20,000 patients with heart disease. The study will help to identify new genes and molecules responsible for Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). This, in turn may help to develop new diagnostic and treatment strategies. The project is being undertaken by postgraduate researcher Paraskevi Christofidou, of the Department of...

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2010-06-16 14:43:09

Inbred male sperm have been found to fertilize fewer eggs when in competition with non-inbred males according to a new study by the University of East Anglia. Research into the breeding habits of the red flour beetle, published June 15 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, shows that the reduced fitness of inbred beetles, known as 'inbreeding depression', reveals itself in competitive scenarios. Inbreeding is a potentially important problem in declining species across the world, and...


Latest Population genetics Reference Libraries

House Mouse, Mus musculus
2012-05-01 11:42:07

Even in the wild, this rodent is associated with humans by destroying crops and stored food. The house mouse is also known as the fancy mouse, a common pet. It is also a widely used laboratory animal, important for testing in genetics, biology, and medicine. There are three recognized subspecies of the house mouse. These mice thrive in a number of locations including fields, houses, and commercial structures. An adult male house mouse can have a body length of up to 3.9 in, and tail length...

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Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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